National Medical Evidence Generation Collaborative (EvGen Collaborative)

By: Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H., and Robert M. Califf, M.D.

Readers of FDAVoice may have noticed that we’ve been talking a lot lately about the topic of evidence generation (for example, see here and here). Scientific evidence—how it’s created, how it’s interpreted, how it’s used to protect the health of Americans—is at the heart of all that we do at FDA.

Rachel Sherman

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., MPH, FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

Over the course of your career, you’ve probably experienced the feeling of being visited by an important insight, but you’ve lacked the kind of clear, unequivocal evidence needed to feel confident that what you were proposing would actually work. Well, you aren’t alone. There has long been a chronic shortage of the information needed to inform decisions affecting health and healthcare, regardless of whether those decisions are being made by patients, physicians, regulators, payers, or other stakeholders.

For this reason, we’re especially pleased to share with you some of the efforts underway this past year to build a National Medical Evidence Generation Collaborative, or EvGen for short. We have a new website devoted to this collaborative, where you can watch videos on the EvGen vision and learn more about the many stakeholders involved.

A key EvGen goal is to leverage previously isolated data systems in a way that ensures that available information collected during healthcare-related activities (e.g., medical research, medical product development, clinical care) can be brought to bear for the benefit of all. As outlined in a recent publication, by combining insights, expertise, and technologies from across the spectrum of federal and private health sectors, we can build a new healthcare environment, one in which, for example, clinical research is embedded seamlessly within real-world clinical practice to create a cycle of improvement in care and outcomes, what is known as a continuously learning healthcare system.

Robert Califf

Robert M. Califf, M.D., Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The vision for EvGen put forward by its many supporters is a momentous opportunity to transform how we approach the myriad decisions that affect different parts of the healthcare ecosystem. For instance, patients would benefit from a more comprehensive, patient-centered and evidence-driven approach that engages them as active participants in care and research. At the same time, practitioners and other healthcare professionals would have access to constantly growing sources of scientific evidence that would enable them to more confidently determine which treatments work best for which patients. And payers would have the information needed to identify which treatments truly provide value to those they cover.

Although the activities described on the EvGen website are a major step forward, much remains to be done. Working together, we can help build a healthcare world in which patients, clinicians, and policymakers have access to the high-quality scientific evidence to support the best choices for individual patients and populations.

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H., is FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

Robert M. Califf, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration