Report Spotlights Achievements of FDA-Mexico Produce Safety Partnership

En Español

By: Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D.

The United States and Mexico are major trading partners in fresh produce. Each year, billions of dollars of fruits and vegetables move across the border. These include Mexican tomatoes, avocados, chilies, berries, cucumbers, lemons, and limes that reach U.S. consumers, as well as American apples, pears, grapes, onions, strawberries, potatoes, peaches and other produce that are sent to Mexico.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D.Both our countries benefit when we can help to ensure that these valuable commodities are safe for consumers on both sides of our borders. For that reason, the FDA-Mexico Produce Safety Partnership (PSP) was formed in July 2014, forging a stronger relationship between the FDA and Mexico’s National Agro-Alimentary Health, Safety, and Quality Service (SENASICA) and its Federal Commission for the Protection from Sanitary Risk (COFEPRIS).

We are pleased to share that our partnership is making real progress toward our goal of reducing the risk of foodborne illness associated with our produce trade. A new report, titled U.S. FDA-Mexico Produce Safety Partnership: A Dynamic Partnership in Action, provides some specific examples of this progress.

For example, the partnership recently worked to address the contamination of papayas grown in Mexico. In the fall of 2017, the FDA, SENASICA and COFEPRIS worked together to respond to four outbreaks of salmonellosis tied to Mexican-grown papayas. The Mexican agencies conducted inspections and sampled various farms and packing houses in several Mexican states, and shared their findings with the FDA. We were able to leverage their work and resources, along with the findings of our own outbreak investigation, to place four farms on import alert, thus providing information to the FDA inspectors who detained those products without having to physically examine them. SENASICA likewise implemented a regulatory response. In October 2017, Mexico strengthened its food safety oversight of papayas, which are subject to the Produce Safety Rule under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act if they will be imported or offered for import in the U.S.

Chart - Mexico Exports of Fresh Produce to USAIn another example, in 2015, Listeria monocytogenes was detected in kiwi and apples grown in the U.S. and exported to Mexico. The exchange of information under the PSP, including the sharing of bacterial isolates and testing by both FDA and SENASICA laboratories, helped prevent more contaminated produce from entering Mexico. It also established a protocol for the future exchange of bacterial strains to improve detection and understanding of contamination.

These are just two of several instances in which the partnership has led to coordinated preventive activities in addition to enforcement activities that help to reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses and enable both countries to respond more rapidly to a potential or actual outbreak, better protecting both American and Mexican consumers.

Chart - U.S. Exports of Fresh Produce to MexicoBut the partnership has also provided benefits beyond individual outbreaks. Both countries have also been working collaboratively through working groups on institutionalizing approaches that reinforce preventive practices and rapid response to outbreaks. The groups have focused on information sharing, education and outreach, training, laboratory methods and processes, and how to respond effectively to outbreaks.

Looking to the future, the report outlines our five-year plan to increase engagement and the exchange of knowledge with key public and private partners. Through the partnership, we plan to also work on identifying common approaches for auditors and inspectors to better execute compliance and enforcement activities, and will create a strategy to conduct joint inspections and sampling. This will help both countries maximize their resources for the benefit of consumers on both sides of the border.

This is a long-term partnership. While there are differences in our systems, technologies, and environments, the U.S. and Mexico both want consumers to be confident in the safety of their food. By working together, we can achieve that goal.

Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

FDA Update on Traceback Related to the E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce

By: Scott Gottlieb, M.D., and Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

The FDA continues to investigate the outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections associated with romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region. Any contaminated product from the Yuma growing region has already worked its way through the food supply and is no longer available for consumption. So any immediate risk is gone. However, the FDA is committed to investigating the source of the outbreak and working with industry to help prevent similar events in the future.

Dr. Scott Gottlieb

Scott Gottlieb, M.D., Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

This is a serious and tragic outbreak. And we’re devoting considerable effort to identifying the primary source. We’ve made progress in recent weeks toward this goal. This outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 illnesses is the largest in the United States in more than 10 years. As of today, it has affected 172 persons in 32 states, and it is anticipated the numbers will be updated on Friday. Tragically, 45 percent of these ill people have been hospitalized, and one has died. And 20 of these people have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), one of the most serious complications that can occur with E. coli O157:H7 infection.

These statistics reflect the severity of this particular foodborne illness. The kidney damage that’s associated with HUS can require temporary dialysis and the kidneys may never fully recover. For these reasons, anytime outbreaks caused by this pathogen occur, we need to find the root cause of the contamination and determine what went wrong. We need to relay these findings to industry so that measures can be put in place to prevent it from happening again.

The FDA’s investigators are actively searching for answers as to the source of this outbreak, and what steps can be taken to prevent it from recurring in future growing seasons. In the current outbreak, illness has generally been linked to the consumption of chopped romaine lettuce. The lettuce was generally consumed at restaurants or purchased at markets. In one cluster of illnesses at an Alaska correctional facility, the prison received and served whole head romaine lettuce rather than chopped and bagged romaine.

The FDA and our state partners have been involved in extensive traceback efforts of the romaine lettuce that was likely consumed by those who became ill. Traceback involves working backwards from the point of consumption or purchase of the product through the supply chain. It often includes investigating the multiple steps along the way. These steps can include suppliers, distributors and processors where the lettuce was chopped and bagged, and then back to the farm or farms that could have grown the lettuce that ended up in those bags. It’s a labor-intensive task. It requires collecting and evaluating thousands of records; and trying to accurately reproduce how the contaminated lettuce moved through the food supply chain to grocery stores, restaurants and other locations where it was sold or served to the consumers who became ill.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

Our traceback efforts are designed to find points of convergence from several well identified clusters of illness with a common point of exposure, such as a restaurant or grocery store. This means that as we draw lines for each cluster from one point in the supply chain to another point, we look for places where the lines will intersect and lead back to a common location. This can then help clarify where the contamination may have taken place.

We usually do this for clusters of ill individuals that occurred in different parts of the country; since lettuce in one part of the country may not follow the same pathway as lettuce in another part of the country. When that point of convergence is identified, efforts can then focus on how the contamination occurred at that location.

We’ve conducted traceback activities for many of the illnesses identified in this outbreak. We’ve used this information to create a traceback diagram that we’re releasing today. The diagram does not include tracebacks for all 172 cases. Rather, it focuses on settings where there were several well-documented clusters of cases. As additional traceback information is received, we anticipate the diagram will be updated.

As can be seen in the diagram, in the current outbreak, and based on the information we have to date, there are still no obvious points of convergence along the supply chain. There is only one straight line back to a single farm. And that particular instance involves the whole head lettuce served in the Alaska correctional facility, since it was not processed and was not mixed with lettuce from multiple farms, as seen in other parts of the traceback.

In these other tracebacks in the diagram, there are different suppliers, distributors and/or processors. These pathways lead back to different farms, sometimes many farms, where possibly contaminated lettuce could have been harvested during the timeframe of interest. The only point of commonality in our traceback efforts to date is that all of the farms are located in the Yuma growing region. This region is where a large portion of the romaine lettuce supply in the United States comes from during the winter months.

What does this traceback diagram tell us?

It says that there isn’t a simple or obvious explanation for how this outbreak occurred within the supply chain. If the explanation was as simple as a single farm, or a single processor or distributor, we would have already figured that out. The traceback diagram does show us that the contamination with E. coli O157:H7 was unlikely to have happened near the end of the supply chain (such as at a distributor) because there are no common distributors among the places that received and sold or served contaminated lettuce. The contamination likely happened at, or close to, the Yuma growing area.

Our task now is to investigate what happened. We are actively evaluating a number of theories about how romaine lettuce grown on multiple farms in the same growing region could have become contaminated around the same time. It’s possible that contamination occurred on multiple farms at once, through some sort of environmental contamination (e.g., irrigation water, air/dust, water used for pesticide application, animal encroachment). Another possibility is that it happened just after the lettuce left the farm. We are examining all possibilities and as we investigate we learn more about a potential common source we will communicate this information with growers and consumers. But the source and mode of contamination may remain difficult to identify.

Our efforts are complicated by the fact that romaine lettuce is a perishable commodity with a short shelf life of a couple of weeks. None of the lettuce that likely made people sick was available for testing because of the time between the incubation period of E. coli O157:H7 (the time between exposure to the lettuce and the onset of illness) and the time it takes to seek health care and collect specimens from ill people, test those specimens, report the illnesses to public health officials, fingerprint the pathogen to make sure it is part of the outbreak, and interview the ill people to identify where and when they were exposed.  By that time, the lettuce they ate which could have made them ill is long gone.

Similarly, the lettuce growing and harvesting season in the Yuma growing region was essentially over by the time the outbreak was recognized in April, and harvesting has since ceased. That is why we, and our colleagues at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have said that there’s no longer any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region available for purchase or consumption.

Romaine lettuce production in this area is now idle until later in the year. This makes it difficult to find places where the E. coli O157:H7 organism that caused the outbreak may have been hiding.

We have no evidence that romaine lettuce from other growing regions have been a part of this outbreak.

The FDA is looking at all possibilities for how the contamination may have caused such a large outbreak. This work will continue. In these efforts, we’re collaborating with outside experts who may have insights, ideas, or suggestions. This includes working with farmers, technical experts, the lettuce processing industry, state partners, and others. It also includes on-site assessments. Through such assessments we may be able to find a possible explanation so that steps can be taken to prevent this problem from recurring.

We’re committed to these efforts, and finding the root cause of this outbreak.

Romaine lettuce is one of the most popular types of lettuce in this country. We want American consumers to be confident in the quality and safety of the lettuce they consume. In addition to working to identify the source and mode of contamination, we will also continue working after the outbreak to evaluate what happened and how lessons learned can be used to provide feedback to industry on best practices and areas to work on. These include better tools to more efficiently and swiftly traceback commodities like lettuce through the supply chain, and better ways to standardize record keeping. We also want to explore the use of additional tools on product packaging that could improve traceability. For example, could QR codes be used to provide additional information that could help consumers more easily identify which lettuce should be avoided and which lettuce is ok to eat?

We’re also working with the leafy greens industry and technical experts to explore methods to grow and process lettuce in ways that further reduce the risk of outbreaks. We live in an era of unprecedented innovation and technology, and we want to bring more of that innovation and technology to bear to help solve this problem and ensure consumer confidence in healthy fruits and vegetables.

Food safety is one of the highest priorities at the FDA. This outbreak is a clear illustration of why that’s the case. It shows the terrible consequences when something goes wrong.

This outbreak marks the importance of moving forward with the Food Safety Modernization Act’s Produce Safety Rule. That rule is designed to implement practical measures to prevent contamination of fruits and vegetables at the farm. This rule is being implemented in close collaboration with our state partners and with our federal partners at the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

State partners will do the vast majority of routine inspections under the Produce Safety Rule. They are often the most familiar with their farming communities and growing and harvest practices. These inspections are slated to begin next year. We’re currently in the process of finalizing the guidance and training farmers throughout the country and those who ship produce to the U.S. on the rule’s requirements.

We believe that the measures outlined by the Produce Safety Rule, when fully implemented, will reduce the chance of an outbreak similar to the one we just experienced. That’s our goal, and our commitment, to the American public.

Scott Gottlieb, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

Follow Commissioner Gottlieb on Twitter @SGottliebFDA

Making the Case for Using Whole Genome Sequencing to Fight Foodborne Illness Globally

By: Steven Musser and Eric L. Stevens

FDA is laying the foundation for the use of whole genome sequencing (WGS) to protect consumers from foodborne illness in countries all over the world.

CODEX speaker

FDA’s Steven Musser speaks at the Codex Alimentarius Commission conference in Geneva.

We recently traveled to Geneva to join a meeting of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, an international organization that works to protect consumer health and promote fair practices in food trade. There, we participated in a panel discussion on how best to share WGS globally to fight foodborne illnesses and elicit support from the world’s governments in this effort.

There’s no time to waste. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that as many as 600 million people in the world fall ill every year after eating contaminated food and 420,000 of these people die.

FDA has been a leader in the use of WGS to identify the nature and source of bacteria that contaminate food and cause outbreaks of foodborne disease. By sequencing the chemical building blocks that make up the DNA of these pathogens, WGS reveals their genetic fingerprint, offering clues about their geographic source, antimicrobial resistance, and other key markers that help scientists respond more effectively to food contamination, preventing illnesses.

CODEX meeting Head table

FDA’s Steven Musser (left) and Eric Stevens (second from right) participate in an international panel on the efforts to share whole genome sequencing globally.

In the last few years, WGS has fundamentally changed the way that we detect, identify and monitor microbiological food safety hazards within the United States. This technology is rapid, precise, cost-effective, easy-to-use, and can be applied universally to all foodborne pathogens.

In 2012, FDA started the GenomeTrakr, a now-international network of laboratories sequencing microbial foodborne pathogens and uploading the data to a common public database in real time. The goal of GenomeTrakr is simple: to assemble a large, freely accessible database of genetic sequence information and accompanying metadata (e.g. geographic location and date) from food, environmental and human clinical isolates of bacterial pathogens. This information can be used by scientists on the trail of disease-causing bacteria, unmasking each contaminant’s identity and offering clues to where and how it got into the food supply.

Recently, public health institutions, including FDA, WHO and FAO (the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations), have been working to raise awareness about the importance of WGS and the benefits of sharing both sequence information and metadata.

In Geneva we talked about how this technology is being utilized in some countries to support their foodborne disease surveillance system or outbreak investigation activities. We all understand that food is a global commodity, with complex shipping and distribution networks that can easily result in contaminated food being sold in more than one country. Thus, the most effective use of WGS in foodborne disease surveillance requires coordination and collaboration, and the panel emphasized the global health benefit of every country sharing their data. One approach would be sharing the data through FDA’s GenomeTrakr.

We are certain that the public health benefit of WGS will only become more evident with every foodborne pathogen’s genomic sequence that is shared. Already, GenomeTrakr has collected more than 142,000 sequenced strains, has made them freely available to anyone in the world, and continues to demonstrate how a large database of this kind is being used effectively for food safety within the United States, and throughout the world.

As the food supply becomes increasingly global, the use of WGS in a way that crosses national borders will ultimately help keep us all safe from foodborne illness.

Steven Musser, Ph.D., is the Deputy Director for Scientific Operations in FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN).

Eric L. Stevens, Ph.D., is a Staff Fellow in FDA’s Division of Microbiology at CFSAN.

Marking the Beginning of a New Era in Food Safety

By: Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

The promises embodied in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) add up to this: The foods that we eat and serve our families must be as safe as we can make them.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D.These promises mandate that food be produced, packed and transported with an awareness of potential hazards and a commitment to taking whatever systematic steps are necessary to eliminate or greatly reduce any risks. They envision a world in which families can share foods produced halfway around the world, knowing that they are held to the same rigorous safety standards as those produced in the United States.

The past nine months have seen the finalization of the seven rules that make FSMA’s promises a reality – for both domestic and imported foods. The last of those rules, one that adds protections against intentional adulteration, became final on May 27. Together, and individually, these rules represent a paradigm shift from simply responding to outbreaks of foodborne illness to preventing them from happening in the first place.

There’s a lot of work to be done in the implementation phase. But even as we look forward, it’s important to recognize that getting to this point with rules that are final is a spectacular achievement, and that many deserve the credit.

Members of Congress joined together to pass FSMA in 2010 because of widespread concern over multistate outbreaks, and lawmakers like Sen. Jerry Moran of Kansas and Rep. Rosa DeLauro of Connecticut have been unwavering in their support since then. Consumers, such as activists in STOP Foodborne Illness, who became sick themselves or who lost loved ones to contaminated food, put their sorrow aside and became champions for the greater good. Public policy organizations like the Pew Charitable Trusts have been steadfast partners throughout the rulemaking and budget processes.

The food industry mobilized to help FDA find the most effective, practical ways to implement these regulations. We worked with national associations that include the Grocery Manufacturers Association and groups with a more regional focus, such as the New England Farmers Union. Farmers, manufacturers, distributors, retailers and many others whose livelihood is directly affected by these rules brought their concerns to the table and worked with us to make the rules as feasible as possible.

We found dedicated partners in other government agencies at the federal, state and international levels. Leanne Skelton of the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been part of the FDA team. The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture is playing an important role in helping FDA meet the challenges of implementing the produce safety rule. State agriculture leaders like Chuck Ross in Vermont, Katy Coba in Oregon and Steve Troxler in North Carolina became a bridge between FDA and the food producers in their states. Our regulatory counterparts in other nations, such as SENASICA and COFEPRIS in Mexico, have joined the fight to increase food protections worldwide.

The people of FDA, under the leadership of Michael R. Taylor, worked tirelessly to find the right intersection between science and policy; to develop innovative and practical solutions to complex challenges; and, to engage in open and meaningful discussions with the many communities within the diverse food supply system. I recently succeeded Mike as deputy commissioner, and I want to acknowledge the importance of his dedication to public health and food safety.

The FDA teams who drafted and revised the rules worked in tandem with teams laying the groundwork for eventual implementation. They have traveled the nation, and the world, to meet with food producers and government officials. They have worked 24/7 on these rules since FSMA became law.

The road ahead towards full implementation of FSMA is a long one. There are miles to go, but thanks to the commitment and hard work of all those who are making this journey, we will keep the promises of FSMA.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

FDA-State Partnership Propels FSMA Implementation

By: Michael R. Taylor and Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

Ever since the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was enacted in 2011, we’ve said that successful implementation is not possible without a meaningful partnership between FDA and its counterparts in state government. This is especially critical in the new area of produce safety regulation.

Michael R. Taylor

Michael R. Taylor, FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

After years of rulemaking – of planning, discussing and revising – this partnership is no longer just an aspiration. Instead, it’s evolving into a real union of public health and regulatory colleagues at the state and federal levels who together are taking concrete steps to make the produce safety protections envisioned by FSMA a reality.

An example of this forward movement is a conference we both attended on March 22 in Orlando, Florida, where the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) unveiled its proposed framework for state participation in the implementation of FDA’s new produce safety rule. This rule—for the first time—establishes enforceable federal safety standards for the production and harvesting of produce on farms.

In 2014, FDA entered into a five-year cooperative agreement with NASDA to work with state partners to collaboratively plan implementation of the produce rule. The NASDA framework will help guide and inform states that are working to develop a state produce safety regulatory program that is aligned with the FSMA rule.

The NASDA framework was developed with the active involvement of 24 state departments of agriculture and five national public health organizations. Key areas addressed include education and compliance, information sharing, regulator training, accessing laboratory resources, technical assistance, and infrastructure.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., formerly FDA’s Acting Commissioner, will be succeeding Mr. Taylor as Deputy Commissioner on June 1

All 50 states were represented at the Orlando meeting to review and discuss the proposed framework, which is intended by NASDA to be a living document that can be refined and improved over time as experience is gained with implementation of the produce safety rule. The level of alignment and energy among participants at the conference – which included 46 agriculture departments and 19 public health departments – was inspiring and demonstrates that we are very much on the right path toward a sustained partnership with our state colleagues.

The states have always been clear in conversations with us, and we have been clear in conversations with Congress, that federal funding is necessary for the work ahead. State agriculture and public health personnel are the ones who have built relationships with and knowledge of local farming communities and practices and can often deliver oversight most efficiently. But almost all states will have to build produce safety programs largely or completely from scratch. We want to rely on them, not only to deliver education and technical assistance, but also to provide ongoing compliance support and oversight.

But this requires resources.

The President’s Fiscal Year 2017 budget request includes $11.3 million in new funds for the National Integrated Food Safety System. We have been building this system to fully integrate the more than 3,000 state, local and tribal government agencies involved in food safety in FDA’s work to meet the FSMA mandate. The FY 2017 funding, which Congress is considering, will be used primarily to support state produce safety programs through cooperative agreements and grants.

The FY 2017 funding builds upon resources for states that Congress provided for FSMA implementation in FY 2016. Earlier this month we took an important step toward distributing these funds – $19 million – to support state produce safety programs by soliciting applications for cooperative agreements with state regulatory agencies. These funds will make an important down payment on the capacity states need to be our full FSMA partners in produce safety. The FY 2017 funding request recognizes that more will be needed – both next year and beyond — to realize this goal.

There is a great diversity in where states are right now in planning and developing their produce safety programs. Some may already have developed multi-tiered plans and are ready to begin implementing. Others may just be starting to consider what’s ahead. This program is designed to give states the support they need at whatever stage they’re in.

Our goal is to get the initial funding to a number of states before the end of this fiscal year.

This has been a long road. But we are gaining real momentum toward the ultimate goal of having a food safety system in place in which government agencies at all levels are working in partnership with each other – and collaboratively with farmers – to ensure that we are doing everything we can to prevent or reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Safe and widely available produce is good for consumers, good for public health, and good for growers. That’s why we’re all in this together.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine; Stephen Ostroff, M.D., formerly FDA’s Acting Commissioner, will be succeeding Mr. Taylor as Deputy Commissioner on June 1.

FSMA Implementation: The Road Is Challenging, but the Company Is Extraordinary

By: Michael R. Taylor

As we begin 2016, it’s a good time to reflect on the extraordinary engagement we’ve had on food safety with the food-producing community and its continuing impact as we move forward to implement the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

Michael R. TaylorIn August and September 2013, we took three important trips – to the Pacific Northwest, New England and Europe – to talk about the rules we had proposed earlier that year to implement FSMA.

What we learned on those trips made a huge impression, one that ultimately shaped more than just the rules. It had a profound effect on our understanding of the diverse global community of food producers, and opened our eyes to the food safety imperative that guides them.

More recently, we retraced our steps this November and December, making those journeys again to discuss the five FSMA rules that became final this fall — establishing preventive controls for human and animal food, setting produce safety standards, and strengthening oversight of imported foods.

First, some background. We had been traveling to farms since 2009, well before FSMA was signed into law in 2011, listening to and learning from farmers. The visits in 2013 were particularly important because FSMA had become law by then and we had specific proposals to discuss.

In the Pacific Northwest and New England, we focused on issues as different as the climate and geography of those regions. Growers who created lush farmland in the high desert regions of Idaho, Oregon and Washington using canal-fed irrigation systems were chiefly concerned about the agricultural water standards. In Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire, discussions centered on the impact of FDA’s plans on the local food movement and on farmers’ efforts to innovate and diversify.

There was a common theme, however: Growers have been understandably concerned about where we’re headed with these food safety regulations and how they will affect farms, especially those that have been in families for generations. So in 2013, with specifics on the table, there were some tough conversations about the merits of our proposals – and how they could be improved. In Europe, our discussions were primarily with our foreign regulatory counterparts, but also reflected uneasiness about the FSMA rules, particularly their impact on foreign trade.

The bottom line is that through these trips, our eyes were indeed opened to some realities. It became clear that we’d need to make changes for the regulations to work for the food industry while still protecting public health.

Fast forward to 2015. We saw familiar faces in our return to the Pacific Northwest and New England for public meetings in Portland, Oregon, on December 1, and in Brattleboro, Vermont, on December 14. These are people who were frank about their reservations and then rolled up their sleeves to work with us on finding solutions. And we did find solutions, building flexibility into the rules that give food producers and importers options and alternatives that still meet important safety criteria.

And in Europe, too, the conversation has turned to next steps. In early December we returned to Brussels and again met with our European Union regulatory counterparts. Europe has similar overarching food safety principles as the U.S. and the leaders we met want to leverage their resources and avoid duplication of effort. And we are looking into that now, beginning by comparing the public health protections in the European standards with those built into the FSMA rules.

The reception was enormously positive in all three places. We’re in a good place with the FSMA rules. Five of the seven rules we proposed have now been finalized, and we intend to publish final regulations on sanitary transportation and intentional adulteration in the spring. President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2016 budget request for FSMA implementation was close to fully funded, with FDA set to receive $104.5 million of the $109.5 million requested. This critical funding will enable us to maintain our momentum toward timely, comprehensive implementation.

We at FDA are gratified and grateful for what we’ve seen since we first took to the road in 2009. It’s clear that from the smallest farm to the halls of Congress, from local food centers to operations half-way around the world, there is a deep, shared commitment to produce safe food.

Without any doubt, there’s still a lot of hard work to be done, and we know some food producers are still apprehensive about the impact of our regulations on their livelihood. So, we will hit the road again beginning in January for more state and international meetings. We are committed to continuing the conversation and implementing FSMA in a practical way. Working together, we will create the modern food safety system envisioned by FSMA, one that makes every reasonable effort to prevent food safety problems and protect consumers and their families from foodborne illness.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine