FDA’s New Pilot Program Aims for More Transparency about New Drug Approvals

By: Janet Woodcock, M.D.

When FDA approves a new drug, it has been found safe and effective when used under the conditions described in the label. Although this concept seems simple, the execution can be complex. Many factors are involved in weighing the benefits a drug can provide against the risks associated with its use. To that end, after we approve a new drug, we also want to make sure the scientific community and the public can understand why we approved it. This can help inform future drug development and, in turn, may facilitate the approval of additional safe and effective medicines.

Janet Woodcock, M.D.One way we explain the “why” behind a drug approval is by sharing information from the clinical trials that supported the approval decision. This information is usually discussed in FDA review documents authored by our physicians and other scientists. But often there is no complete description of the important efficacy trials, including the trial protocols, descriptions of any modifications made during the trial itself, and an explanation of all of the results. That’s why we launched the Clinical Data Summary Pilot in January. During the pilot, we will post key portions of the Clinical Study Reports (CSRs) – documents that sponsors create for FDA on each of their clinical studies. These portions would contain complete summaries of the study results, the protocol and protocol amendments, and the statistical plan. FDA plans to release these portions of the CSRs for the pivotal studies that supported the approval. The reports will be redacted by FDA to exclude confidential commercial information, trade secrets, and personal privacy information. FDA will not release patient-level data. Our goal is to share more directly complete summaries of the clinical trial information we have evaluated to determine whether a drug is safe and effective.

Currently FDA posts its review documents on line – material we call drug approval action packages. While the action packages include a significant amount of information pulled in from the sponsor’s application, that information is frequently separated into different sections and does not provide a complete summary of the results of any given study. This makes it difficult for academic researchers, regulators in other agencies, and other stakeholders to gain an in-depth understanding of the studies supporting approval. By providing the CSRs we hope to:

  • Enhance the accuracy of information used in scientific publications;
  • Increase stakeholders’ understanding of the basis for FDA’s approval decisions; and,
  • Inform physicians and other healthcare providers about the detailed results that regulatory decisions were based on.

The pilot will post the CSRs from up to 9 approved new drug applications of participating sponsors. We hope that reviewing the CSRs will help the scientific community better understand the information FDA used to evaluate an application and make an approval decision. At the end of the pilot we plan to seek comment from the public through a Federal Register notice to hear first-hand how the information was accessed and used. We hope to hear from a wide variety of stakeholders!

Our first pilot participant is Janssen Biotech for the approval of Erleada (apalutamide), the first FDA-approved treatment for non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, as well the first to use the clinical trial result, or endpoint, of metastasis-free survival. Today we posted the CSR of the pivotal study with the regular action package. It’s a novel drug and we believe the CSR information, together with the FDA review, label, and other supporting documents, will facilitate a deeper understanding of how we reached our approval decision.

As an added benefit, our pilot program can help with global alignment, as our counterparts at the European Medicines Agency are similarly working to make information about their approvals more accessible and easier to understand.

The Clinical Summary Pilot is one of many efforts underway that require FDA working with industry to advance science. Now that it’s launched, we look forward to collaborating with sponsors who have an active or forthcoming NDA at FDA and who wish to participate in the pilot. For more information, visit the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s new pilot program page on our website.

Janet Woodcock, M.D., is Director of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research