Protecting and Promoting Public Health: Advancing the FDA’s Medical Countermeasures Mission

By Anna Abram

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s wide-ranging public health responsibilities include the vital role we play on the frontlines of national security by facilitating the development and availability of safe and effective medical countermeasures. These are the vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics that are needed to protect our nation from chemical, biological, and radiological and nuclear threats, whether naturally occurring, accidental, or deliberate. As in so many areas of public health, our work here is critical, and we are ever-cognizant of its urgency.

One of the many areas in which the agency is continuing to take steps to facilitate the development of medical countermeasures to protect Americans is with respect to the threat of smallpox. The World Health Assembly declared naturally occurring smallpox eradicated worldwide in 1980, following an unprecedented global immunization campaign. However, small amounts of the variola virus – the virus that causes smallpox – still exist for research purposes in two labs; one of these labs is in the U.S. and the other in Russia. Despite the eradication of naturally occurring smallpox disease, there are longstanding concerns that the variola virus could be used as a weapon. Since routine vaccination was discontinued in the 1970s, many people would be at high risk of getting very ill or dying if exposed to this highly contagious virus.

Medical Countermeasures Against Smallpox

The development of medical countermeasures for smallpox presents complex and unique challenges. It is not possible to conduct clinical trials involving patients with naturally occurring smallpox and exposing humans to the variola virus would be ethically unthinkable. To address this challenge – which also applies to many of the high-priority threat agents for which medical countermeasure are being developed – the FDA in 2002 established the Animal Rule, which allows efficacy data to be obtained solely from studies in animals when studies in humans are not ethical or feasible, provided the results can be reasonably extrapolated to expected human use and plans can be made for follow-up study when appropriate. (The FDA finalized guidance on product development under the Animal Rule in 2015).

Anna Abram

Anna Abram is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Policy, Planning, Legislation, and Analysis

However, the variola virus poses additional issues for drug developers. Unlike other products studied under the Animal Rule, studies of smallpox countermeasures require not just a surrogate host but also a surrogate pathogen. Most pathogens are capable of infecting multiple host species and therefore can be studied in other, nonhuman, species. But the variola virus only infects humans, which means that variola virus animal models are unlikely to convincingly resemble the human disease. To help delineate a path forward, the FDA issued a draft guidance “Smallpox (Variola) Infection: Developing Drugs for Treatment and Prevention” in 2007 and brought these important issues to an FDA public workshop in 2009 and an FDA advisory committee meeting in 2011. The revised draft guidance issued last week incorporates this input, providing developers with additional clarity on the regulatory path for products intended to treat smallpox. It recommends that efficacy be demonstrated based on studies in two animal models infected with related viruses – such as a monkey model using monkeypox and a rabbit model using rabbitpox. This guidance underscores how the FDA is continually working to identify and apply efficient solutions based on the most up-to date science in its regulation of safe and effective medical products.

The ultimate testament to the success of these efforts is the approval on July 13 of TPOXX (teconvirimat), the first drug with an indication for the treatment of smallpox and the 14th medical countermeasure approved under the Animal Rule. In conjunction with this product approval, the sponsor was awarded the first Material Threat Medical Countermeasure Priority Review Voucher, established by the 21st Century Cures Act, to incentivize the development of certain medical countermeasures against some of the most serious threat agents.

The FDA’s Other Recent Work on Medical Countermeasures

Smallpox isn’t the only area of medical countermeasure work ongoing at the FDA. On July 10, we approved an autoinjector which provides a one-time dose of the antidote atropine to block the effects of a nerve agent or certain insecticide poisonings (organophosphorus and/or carbamate).

We also recently issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to the Department of Defense (DoD), permitting the emergency use of a specific freeze-dried plasma product manufactured to treat U.S. military personnel with severe or life-threatening hemorrhage or coagulopathy (a condition that affects the blood’s ability to clot) due to traumatic injuries sustained in the conduct of military operations in situations when plasma is not available or when its use is not practical. The use of plasma in combat settings is severely limited by logistical and operational challenges, such as the need for refrigeration and, in the case of frozen plasma, a long thawing period. In January 2018, the FDA and DoD announced a joint program to prioritize the efficient development of safe and effective medical products intended to save the lives of American military personnel.  We are working closely with our DoD colleagues in these important priority areas, including the goal of having a licensed freeze-dried plasma product as soon as possible.

These are just some of the ways in which the FDA has been hard at work to advance our medical countermeasure mission. But there is more work to do and the agency is committed to doing it. We are constantly reminded that chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats – whether deliberate, naturally occurring or accidental – can, and often do, emerge with little to no warning. Emerging threats are often not deterred by geographical boundaries in our modern times. The recent Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a reminder of the need to remain ever vigilant in our work to advance medical countermeasures as part of protecting and promoting public health.

We are committed to doing all that we can to continue to facilitate the development and availability of medical countermeasures. The FDA’s Medical Countermeasures Initiative (MCMi), established in 2010, is focused on providing clear regulatory pathways for medical countermeasures, advancing regulatory science to support regulatory decision-making, and articulating important regulatory policies and mechanisms to facilitate the timely development and availability of medical countermeasures. These actions are translating into tangible results. Since 2012, the FDA has approved, licensed or cleared more than 120 medical countermeasures (including supplemental changes to already approved applications and modifications to diagnostic devices) for a diverse array of threats including anthrax, smallpox, botulinum toxin, plague, and pandemic influenza.

Under the MCMi, the FDA is taking key actions to address many of the challenges associated with countermeasure development. For example, we still do not have adequate animal models to support the development of medical countermeasures against many potential biothreats nor do we have sufficient biomarkers to assist in supporting the extrapolation of data generated in animal models to humans. Without such tools, it can be difficult to generate the data necessary to support regulatory decision-making.

Given the urgency inherent in our medical countermeasure work, addressing these regulatory science gaps remains a high priority for the agency. To help address these challenges, the FDA has established a broad and robust portfolio of cutting-edge research under the MCMi Regulatory Science Program and is working with our private sector and government partners, including DoD, to help facilitate the translation of discoveries in science and technology into safe and effective medical countermeasures. Congress has also provided vital support and our recent actions in this space underscore how we are fully leveraging the authorities Congress has given us, including measures enacted as part of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act of 2013 and the 21st Century Cures Act.

The FDA remains deeply committed to working closely with its partners to achieve our mission of protecting and promoting the public health, both at home and abroad, by doing our part to facilitate the timely development of safe and effective medical countermeasures to protect our nation.

Anna Abram is the FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Policy, Planning, Legislation and Analysis.

FDA Budget Matters: Investing in Advanced Domestic Manufacturing

By: Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

There’s new technology that can improve drug quality, address shortages of medicines, lower drug costs, and bring pharmaceutical manufacturing back to the United States. At the FDA, we’re focused on propelling these innovations, collectively referred to as advanced manufacturing.

Dr. Scott GottliebAdvanced manufacturing, which includes various technologies, such as continuous manufacturing and 3D printing, holds great promise for improving the American market for drugs and biologicals.

Consider continuous manufacturing. These methods integrate traditional step-wise manufacturing processes into a single system that’s based on modern process monitoring and controls. This enables a steady output of finished drug products even as raw materials are continuously added to the closed system. The closed and continuous nature of these manufacturing systems means that the process is easier to control. These systems also require smaller footprints to operate.

And they’re far more efficient than standard manufacturing processes.

3D printing is another approach to advanced manufacturing. These methods are capable of manufacturing pre-determined 3D geometric structures of solid drug products in various shapes, strengths and distributions of active and inactive ingredients. This approach provides a unique opportunity to produce medicines that are tailored for individual needs of patients.

But harnessing the potential of these innovations requires deliberate private and public investments and new policy development. We need to define how these new technologies will be regulated for their reliability and safety. And provide clear guidance on how they can be adopted by sponsors.

The FDA is taking many steps to help realize the potential of advanced manufacturing. We’ve been issuing guidance on emerging technologies and approving continuous manufacturing for several New Drug Applications. However, to drive an earnest and more efficient conversion to these often-superior platforms, it’s going to take a broader effort on the part of the Agency.

The bottom line is this: Drug makers won’t switch to these systems until we create a clear path toward their adoption, and provide more regulatory certainty that changing over to a new manufacturing system won’t be an obstacle to either new or generic drug approvals. The FDA recognizes that it’ll require additional investment in policies and programs that’ll provide regulatory clarity to enable these new methods to be more quickly and widely adopted. To achieve these goals, the President’s fiscal year 2019 budget dedicates $58 million to accelerate the development of the regulatory and scientific architecture needed to progress this technology.

diagrams of continuous and batch manufacturingMany of the technologies currently used in traditional “batch” drug manufacturing – where the ultimate finished product is made after many stops and starts in a series of steps – are decades old. This shouldn’t come as a complete surprise. Drug development is a risky endeavor. After drug makers have navigated the years of risk involved in discovering and developing a new medicine, the last thing they want to do is inject a whole bunch of uncertainty at the last step toward approval – the adoption of the manufacturing process. So most drug makers have continued to use tried and true methods, even if these conventional processes have shortcomings.

However, this customary calculus is changing.

These continuous manufacturing systems are more ideally suited to new trends in drug development, such as personalized medicine and regenerative medicine products. Drugs that target small patient populations will require much greater manufacturing flexibility. The small scale of continuous manufacturing equipment works well for these endeavors. Close and continuous manufacturing systems can provide cost-effective drug product for early stage clinical development and yet can easily ramp up production for commercialization.

While development trends and market forces have made the commercial impetus for private capital investment in these technologies clear, meaningful adoption will not occur without supporting regulatory science and a collaborative regulatory environment. To drive adoption, the FDA will need to establish clear principles for how these new platforms will be evaluated and approved. We need to invest in the regulatory science to develop policies to support these innovations. That includes, for example, the development of analytical tools for monitoring these continuous systems. While much of this scientific work will be done outside the agency (typically through public and private partnerships) the basic regulatory principles need to be defined by the FDA.

The FDA has recognized and embraced the potential for this technology for years. We established an Emerging Technology Team in 2014 that works collaboratively with companies for both new and currently marketed drugs to support the use of advanced manufacturing.

The FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research is building on that effort. We’re advancing the application of continuous manufacturing and other cutting-edge technologies. These manufacturing approaches may be ideally suited to new biological platforms like cell and gene therapies, as well as vaccines. In some cases, these manufacturing approaches may be the key enabling technology for the safe and effective development of these new biological platforms.

Take gene therapy as one example. Many gene therapies are being developed for very small populations ranging from tens to hundreds of patients. It can be costly and slow to build traditional manufacturing platforms to support such small yields, or to switch from a small, research grade manufacturing platform to one capable of supporting bigger trials, or commercial launch. And when it comes to products like gene therapies, a lot of the uncertainty is in how these products are manufactured. So, switching between different manufacturing platforms can create risk.

Applying continuous manufacturing approaches to these products could allow for the development of a quality manufacturing process that could support the production of enough commercial grade product to conduct an initial clinical trial as small as 10 to 20 patients. This would represent one production “cassette.”  Using continuous manufacturing, the scaling of manufacturing for larger trials wouldn’t require the build out of a completely new manufacturing facility. It would just require the introduction of additional “cassettes” into the closed system. Subsequently, if the clinical trial produced definitive data on safety and efficacy, then marketing could commence with product produced by making use of additional manufacturing cassettes. This could have a transformational effect on the costs and feasibility of applying gene therapy to rare diseases.

These manufacturing technologies are not only suited to emerging technologies, but also help address old challenges, like issues with drug shortages and pharmaceutical quality.

Drug shortages are a serious public health issue. What’s not widely known is that quality issues cause the majority of drug shortages. These quality issues are often related to facility remediation efforts and product manufacturing issues. Drug shortages have consequences for patient access to critical and lifesaving drugs. They also can cause prices to rise, in some cases substantially.

Continuous manufacturing systems may be far less prone to the shortcomings that trigger many drug shortages. This technology also reduces the number of steps in the manufacturing process and centralizes all manufacturing steps in one location. Simplification and centralization, in turn, allows for issues to be identified – and remedied – more quickly. In this way, continuous manufacturing helps address the primary root causes of drug shortages. Advanced manufacturing techniques also allow for more flexible manufacturing capacity, which enables manufacturers to respond to drug shortages faster. With these systems, drug makers can more quickly adjust volumes based on product demand and therefore release product to the market more quickly.

This flexibility – and the capacity to increase production easily – could also be important for vaccines; both for seasonal flu and vaccines to combat new outbreaks.

For example, egg-based vaccine manufacturing requires about six months to meet demand, which requires the World Health Organization and public health agencies to predict the flu strand six months prior to the flu season. In contrast, advanced manufacturing has the potential to expedite the process, shortening the amount of time between when the flu strain is selected and distributed.

This can allow us to produce the vaccine closer to the flu season, when we might have more certainty about the circulating strain. It also allows us to switch the strain more easily in the event of an unforeseen change. Or to produce a new vaccine in the event of a pandemic. These approaches also enable easier scaling of manufacturing if vaccine supplies should run short.

This additional flexibility when it comes to manufacturing can also provide a critical boost for emergency preparedness products, enabling manufacturing that can be more easily scaled to quickly respond to new threats. Consider when access to a vaccine is a key strategic need; for example, a vaccine to guard against a bioterror threat. Instead of stockpiling massive volumes of the vaccine; we would instead be able to mothball a just-in-time continuous manufacturing platform. The system could then scale up production in the event of an infectious threat.

Advanced manufacturing also provides an opportunity for the U.S. to regain a leadership position in pharmaceutical manufacturing and bring more high-quality manufacturing jobs back to this country. Many of the products that would benefit from advanced manufacturing are breakthrough-designated drug products that are usually first approved and marketed in the U.S. But many are still manufactured overseas. The traditional approach to manufacturing drugs requires large facilities and a lot of manual labor. Drug makers have made a calculation that these manufacturing sites can be operated more cheaply in countries with lower labor costs.

Continuous manufacturing changes this calculus.

These advanced platforms are small footprint operations. They require a reduced complement of more highly skilled workers. It’s the sort of manufacturing where America excels.

The U.S. is the current pioneer for advanced manufacturing. Our investments in educating engineers and establishing a research base for the development of domestic facilities will ensure that we maintain our lead in the world. Many U.S. universities have already established advanced manufacturing academic programs that train on these approaches. Some are funded through grants from the FDA that were authorized in 21st Century Cures. These approaches have also been applied with success to other fields, such electronic devices and chemical industries.

Producing more drugs domestically doesn’t just mean more American jobs. It could also reduce import costs for manufacturers and increase security of our supply chain.

Continuous manufacturing technologies could save 30 percent in manufacturing costs. This estimate does not include the savings from potential future technologies. That totals $60 billion per year in savings in the United States. This can help reduce drug costs. PCAST estimates that “Continuous manufacturing may reduce manufacturing costs, which currently consume as much as 27 percent of the revenue for many pharmaceutical companies, by up to 40 to 50 percent.”

One example of promising investment in these technologies is recent efforts by General Electric to “launch prefabricated manufacturing units for producing virus-based gene and cell therapies, novel anti-cancer treatments and vaccines.” Innovations like these could make it more feasible for small, innovative biotech companies to enter the market and compete against larger pharmaceutical companies, especially for gene and cell-based cancers. This could provide a broader array of innovation, and infuse more competition into these promising therapeutic areas.

The agility of continuous manufacturing platforms should ultimately reduce costs of drug manufacturing and could provide savings to our health system. But the efficient adoption of these approaches will require a paradigm change in the regulation of manufacturing. And that will require an investment to write new principles for how the FDA oversees these tasks. This is the opportunity before the FDA, and the heart of the proposal in the President’s budget.

Scott Gottlieb, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Follow Commissioner Gottlieb on Twitter @SGottliebFDA

Additional Resources:

“Continuous Manufacturing” -Common Guiding Principles Can Help Ensure Progress

Establishment of a Public Docket-Submission of Proposed Recommendations for Industry on Developing Continuous Manufacturing of Solid Dosage Drug Products in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

Spotlight on CDER Science: Modernizing the Way Drugs Are Made: A Transition to Continuous Manufacturing

Emerging Technology Program

FDA Budget Matters: A Cross-Cutting Data Enterprise for Real World Evidence

By: Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

Over time, as our experience with new medical products expands, our knowledge about how best to maximize their benefits and minimize any potential risks, sharpens with each data point we gather. Every clinical use of a product produces data that can help better inform us about its safety and efficacy.

Dr. Scott GottliebThe FDA is committed to developing new tools to help us access and use data collected from all sources. This includes ways to expand our methodological repertoire to build on our understanding of medical products throughout their lifecycle, in the post market. We don’t limit our knowledge to pre-market information, traditional de novo post-market studies, and passive reporting. Newer methodologies enable us to collect data from routine medical care and develop valid scientific evidence that’s appropriate for regulatory decision making to help patients and health care providers prevent, diagnose, or treat diseases.

This includes our ability to leverage what’s often referred to as “real world data.” Real world data consists of data relating to patient health status and/or the delivery of health care routinely collected from a variety of sources, including information obtained at the point of care. By using this information, we can gain a deeper understanding of a medical product’s safety and benefits, its additional treatment implications, and its potential limitations. By better leveraging this information, we can also enable more efficient medical product development by integrating greater complements of safety and benefit information gleaned from clinical care. This is especially true when it comes to our important obligation to continue to evaluate products in the post-market setting.

Traditional randomized clinical trials can provide key information on a medical product’s performance to support regulatory marketing decisions and health care decisions made by patients and providers. However, traditional clinical trials have their own limitations. The FDA, along with others, sometimes benefit from more information than these trials can provide about how medical products are used in medical practice.

For example, traditional clinical trials have patient inclusion and exclusion criteria that often narrow the patient population that can participate in a traditional trial. So, patients who’ve undergone another treatment, or who are taking other medications, may not qualify for a certain trial that’s looking for patients who haven’t been treated for that disease or condition, or who are taking certain medications.

When this product comes to market, it’s possible that patients who pursued other treatments or patients taking medications for other conditions will be prescribed this therapy. Because these patients weren’t studied, there’ll be no clinical trial evidence available showing how these other factors may affect the safety or efficacy of this product. Clinical trials provide a picture of a medical product’s potential in a narrow and highly controlled setting. But they do not provide a complete picture as to how a product works outside of that setting. This can limit our broader understanding of how a new product will work in “the real world.”

Real World Evidence diagramThe FDA is uniquely positioned and qualified to lead the effort to expand the use of real world data to address these knowledge gaps. Over the past decade, through the FDA’s Sentinel System and the National Evaluation System for health Technology (NEST), the FDA has begun to harness formerly untapped information to help us answer some of the most pressing questions facing patients and providers about the use of medical products. This use of real world data is referred to as “real world evidence.” This is meant to express the use of real world data to generate practical clinical evidence regarding the potential benefits or risks of a product. In this case, the evidence is derived from analysis of real world data.

We’re working to promote and expand the use of both real world data and real world evidence in medical product development and regulatory science. And not only for FDA uses, but also for others that seek to answer critical questions about health care delivery. To accomplish this goal, the FDA will leverage our knowledge and skills from building and using the Sentinel System and further supporting the development of NEST. Most importantly, we must develop the means to govern the responsible use of these data and to provide timely access to a broad group of public and private entities through the creation of a national resource. All the while, we must maintain strict data security and privacy of personal information.

To these ends, as part of the President’s Fiscal Year 2019 Budget, we’ve put forward a $100M medical data enterprise proposal to build a modern system that would rely on the electronic health records from about 10 million lives. This system would expand the data enterprise that we already maintain by incorporating new information from electronic health records, and other sources that would allow us to more fully evaluate medical products in the post-market setting.

This is the next evolution in the Agency’s development of a comprehensive data enterprise to improve medical product regulation and better inform us on the safety and benefits of new innovations.

Post-Market Data Sources: Claims Data vs. EHRs

Previously, our investments in post-market data have mostly focused on the development of systems to consolidate and analyze information derived from healthcare payer claims. This was a key advance in our regulatory system. And relying on health claims information was the state of the art at the time that we built these systems. Now we have the capacity to use clinical data derived from electronic health records to develop faster reporting on the performance of medical products in real world medical settings.

Claims data provides important insights. But it also has some limitations. For example, there’s an inherent lag between when a medical event occurs, and when it’ll show up in payer claims. There’s also some ambiguity in this process. It’s not always clear, by looking at claims data alone, what actually happened to the patient and whether the medical product was a factor. So, in the current system, we need to make certain assumptions when we evaluate claims data, to draw conclusions from this information. And some of these assumptions can inject uncertainty. The FY 2019 Budget request seeks to address some of these limitations by giving the Agency the ability to access the clinical medical information contained in de-identified electronic health records.

Investments in such a system can become a national utility for improving medical care, and allowing the FDA to optimize its regulatory decisions. It would give patients and providers the access to near-real-time, post-market information that can better inform their decisions. Such an enterprise can not only support our evaluation of safety and benefit using data derived from real-world settings, but it can also make the development of new innovations more efficient. If we have more dependable, near-real-time tools for evaluating products in real-world settings, we can allow key questions to be further evaluated in the post-market setting. This can allow some of the cost of development to be shifted into the post-market, where we can sometimes access better information about how products perform in real-world settings.

Establishing a System that can Leverage All Data Sources

Real world data can come from many sources. It not only can include electronic health records, but also claims and billing activities, product and disease registries, patient-related activities in out-patient or in-home use settings, and mobile health devices. It’s key that the sources of these data elements, such as different health care systems, be able to communicate electronically. This requires full “interoperability” and the elimination of any silos. The FY 2019 Budget request seeks to establish these building blocks, and assemble the data into an interoperable platform. There are several foundational steps that we’re already undertaking to build a strong programmatic basis for using real world data and evidence.

Achieving interoperability and establishing data standards, while conceptually obvious, is by no means easy to accomplish. Different groups may collect the same information in different ways. Consider that one group collects temperature using Celsius and another uses Fahrenheit. The group that uses Celsius may document a temperature of 37 degrees, while the one that uses Fahrenheit would document a temperature of 98.6 degrees. While these both are the same finding, in the absence of data standards, they would appear drastically different. Therefore, one key to this effort is the development of data standards and agreed upon definitions that allow different groups to meaningfully share their data.

Additionally, as noted above, there are many potential sources of real world data. Our familiarity and ability to harness these data varies across these sources. For example, the Sentinel System has taken advantage of a well-established source of real world data, claims and billing data. But claims and billing data, while well established and characterized, don’t necessarily capture the full scope of actual patient treatment. When it comes to medical devices, these claims data may not include the Unique Device Identifier which can limit the utility of the information. In addition, physicians may not be recoding every treatment in claims and billing data because of payment bundles, so the exact treatment is not known.

In comparison, electronic health records capture more of the patient experience and have the potential to provide more “real-time” information. But the information is also captured in a much less standardized way. Often key information is documented in unstructured ‘free text’ as part of a provider’s note. So, standardizing this information — and assembling it into formats that can allow for easier analysis and integration — will take additional investment in systems that can consolidate this information and make it interoperable.

Part of our proposed investment will go toward building these new capabilities to assemble real world data into formats to make this information more accessible. Ultimately, our goal is that such a tool can become a national utility that can be accessed by qualified research partners to inform a host of important clinical questions.

Improving Clinical Trials

The development of such a tool can also make the entire clinical trial process much more efficient. And it can enable us to enroll more patients from more diverse backgrounds into trials.

For example, real world data can be used to more efficiently identify and recruit patients for a clinical trial. Key design considerations, such as randomization, can be integrated across clinical care settings, introducing a much more diverse population into the clinical trial system. Innovative statistical approaches — such as Bayesian and propensity scores methods — can combine information from different sources and potentially reduce the size and duration of a clinical trial while expanding the scope of healthcare questions that we’re able to evaluate. This will enable a modern clinical trial system that improves upon trials being conducted in large medical care centers. It could enable more clinical trials at smaller community-based health care providers. Such a system can expand the number of patients we’re able to evaluate, and broaden the information that we’re able to collect, while at the same time reducing the cost of developing this information. We can have more and better information, and a less costly process.

All of this is contingent upon our ability to have confidence in the quality of data we’re accessing to make decisions, be that regulatory or derived from individual patient care.  We’re working with public and private partners to ensure optimal data quality, validity, and utilization. Our goal is to develop better data standards, to promote interoperability, and improve data quality.

Investing in Tools to More Wisely Use Data to Improve Health

Data quality has different impacts when considering the use of this data for individual patient care as opposed to broader public health evaluations. However, our capacity to make effective use of real world data and real world evidence will have a profound impact on individual patients and the public health.

Investing in the creation of a national resource that leverages real world data, establishes data standards to facilitate interoperability, and promotes data quality for the integration of this evidence into medical product development and clinical care is a key national investment. It’ll improve patient care, and make the process for developing safe and effective new medical innovations more efficient. It’ll give us a near real-time tool for monitoring the post-market safety of medical products, and will help inform better and more timely regulatory decisions.

Most importantly, such a system will provide patients with better care and more informed treatment decisions. The wider use of real world data could decrease the cost of product development, while increasing our understanding of how, when, and in whom, to use medical products. It’ll allow us to use the post-market period to refine our understanding of medical products. And it’ll allow us to make reliable post-market information available to providers and patients to better inform their treatment decisions.

Scott Gottlieb, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration 

Follow Commissioner Gottlieb on Twitter @SGottliebFDA