Celebrating a Year of the Expedited Access Pathway Program for Medical Devices

By: Erin Cutts, B.S., Owen Faris, Ph.D., and Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is committed to supporting patient access to high-quality, safe, and effective medical devices of public health importance — as quickly as possible.

Erin Cutts

Erin Cutts, B.S., Policy Lead, Q-Submission Program (acting), Office of Device Evaluation in FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health

For patients suffering from life-threatening conditions and who have few, if any, options, this access becomes critical. About a year ago, FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health created the voluntary Expedited Access Pathway (EAP) program to facilitate the development of and access to new technology for these patients who desperately need them.

The EAP program represents a collaborative approach to help manufacturers with product development and evaluation. Products in the EAP program ultimately undergo either Premarket Approval (PMA) or de novo review.

Other device programs may focus specifically on premarket review once a submission has been made. But EAP allows FDA and sponsors to focus on the early stages of product development, which can be helpful for new products that address the unmet — and critical — life-threatening patient needs. In fact, we think the EAP program will have most impact when sponsors request EAP designation prior to beginning an IDE pivotal study. That way we can work with the sponsor to make sure the data being collected in the pivotal study are appropriate to include in the device’s manufacturing submission.

Owen Faris

Owen Faris, Ph.D., Clinical Trials Director, Office of Device Evaluation in FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

For the devices in the EAP program, FDA, including senior leadership, maintains a high level of interaction with sponsors and provides advice on efficient device development. What does this mean? While working with the device sponsor, FDA carefully considers the risks and benefits of the new device, as well as the risks of delaying a new therapy to patients who have few or no other options. It may be appropriate to accept more initial uncertainty for devices in the EAP program so that an important technology can reach patients sooner. This uncertainty can be further addressed by collecting additional data once the device is on the market.

Jeffrey Shuren

Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., Director of FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health

Over the past year, FDA has made 29 decisions on requests for EAP designation: 17 have been accepted into the program, and 12 have been denied. These decisions were typically made in 30 days.

EAP designation requests have included devices for the heart, brain, and kidneys that are manufactured by small start-up companies and large corporations. We expect that our resources and focus on these promising technologies under the EAP program will allow them to be evaluated and enter the market more quickly, therefore providing options to the patients who need them most.

Projects should meet certain criteria to qualify for the EAP program:

  • The device should treat or diagnose a life threatening or irreversibly debilitating disease or condition;
  • The device should address an unmet need, which is usually shown by comparing the device to other available options; and,
  • The company should have a Data Development Plan outlining what will be included in future submissions to FDA. This plan helps FDA and the company agree on the high level items up front to prevent confusion and delays later in the FDA review process.

As the program has grown in the past year, we’ve  learned that companies who benefit most from this program are those that have a preliminary proof of principle for how their device works, but haven’t undertaken formal studies to support future submissions to FDA. For these companies, discussing their Data Development Plan with the FDA and agreeing on a roadmap to their marketing application and beyond is an important part of a successful review.

So what’s next? As we look forward to the EAP program’s second year,we remain excited about the possibilities it presents – and to be working with industry to quickly bring new and innovative devices to patients.

Erin Cutts, B.S., is Policy Lead, Q-Submission Program (acting), Office of Device Evaluation in FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

Owen Faris, Ph.D., is Clinical Trials Director, Office of Device Evaluation in FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., is Director of FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

Unveiling the New Nutrition Facts Label

By: Robert M. Califf, M.D., and Susan Mayne, Ph.D.

Today, the FDA has finalized the new Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods with changes that will make it easier for consumers to make informed choices about what they’re eating.

Robert Califf

Robert M. Califf, M.D., Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Our goal is to help people make better informed food choices that support a healthy diet. The changes are based on updated science that reinforces the link between diet and chronic conditions such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes.

This is not about telling people what they should eat. It’s about making sure that they know what they’re eating. With that knowledge, they can make more healthful choices. For example, the new Nutrition Facts label includes the addition of information about added sugars. Studies have shown that healthy dietary patterns that include lower amounts of sugar-sweetened foods and beverages are strongly associated with reduced cardiovascular disease.

Obesity continues to be an epidemic in this country, and excess weight can lead to a host of health problems. People who want make healthier food choices will really benefit from the more prominent display of calories and updated information about serving sizes that more accurately reflects what people are likely to eat in one serving.

Susan Mayne

Susan Mayne, Ph.D., FDA’s Director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

We all play many different roles in life. In addition to taking care of ourselves, we’re parents and grandparents who want to take good care of our families. We have busy lives, and we need ready access to information about the nutritional value of the foods we eat. That’s why design changes to the label will make it easier to see essential information at a glance; including calories and information about serving sizes and servings per container.

The label also reflects new or updated Daily Values (DVs), which are the reference amounts of nutrients to consume or not to exceed and the basis of the percent Daily Value (% DV) on the nutrition label. In addition to added sugars, new nutrients that must be declared include Vitamin D, which is important in bone development, and potassium, which is good for controlling blood pressure; both nutrients of which people aren’t getting enough.

Across the board, this is a better label for all of us. And you can have confidence in the science on which it is based, including evidence used to support the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, nutrition intake recommendations from the Institute of Medicine, and nutrition intake information from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

We’ve reached an important milestone, but our work is not yet done. Our next step is to reach out to the larger community to provide education and outreach on the new label and what it means for consumers and families.

The Nutrition Facts label can make a real difference in helping consumers have the information they need to make dietary choices that support a healthy diet.

Robert M. Califf, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Susan Mayne, Ph.D., is FDA’s Director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

From Competition to Collaboration: precisionFDA Challenges

By: Taha Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S., Zivana Tezak, Ph.D., and Elaine Johanson

Next week, we will announce the winners of the first precisionFDA challenge.

Taha Kass-Hout

Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S., FDA’s Chief Health Informatics Officer (CHIO) and Director of FDA’s Office of Health Informatics

We set up precisionFDA as an online, cloud-based, virtual research space to allow scientists from academia, industry, health care organizations, and government to work together on creating tools to evaluate a method of “reading” DNA known as next generation sequencing (or NGS). The ultimate goal of precisionFDA is to foster innovation and develop regulatory science around NGS tests, which are essential to achieving the promise of President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative. So far, the response to precisionFDA has been gratifying, with participants calling precisionFDA “refreshing”, “innovative,” and “a new paradigm in regulatory science.” The community currently boasts more than 1,500 users from 600 organizations, with more than 10 terabytes of genetic data stored.

To engage users and encourage sharing of data and ideas, precisionFDA has offered two competitions to date. These competitions are motivating community members to demonstrate the effectiveness of their tools, test the capabilities of the precisionFDA platform, and engage the community in discussions and data analysis that will provide new insights and serve as a comprehensive source of information about reference data and software pipelines used to analyze sequencing results.

Zevana Tezak

Zivana Tezak, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science and Technology at FDA’s Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health, Center for Devices and Radiological Health

The first precisionFDA challenge, the Consistency Challenge, closed in April 2015, with 21 entries from 17 submitters. Participants were given two datasets of whole genome sequences from a known human sample, sequenced at two different sites and generously donated to precisionFDA by Garvan Institute of Medical Research and Human Longevity, Inc. Challenge participants were instructed to use the informatics pipeline (software) of their choice to identify genetic variants and check for consistency between results in the provided datasets. The top performers will be announced in person by FDA Commissioner Robert Califf on May 25, 2016. At the time of his announcement, we will post detailed information here on all the recognitions and how the top performers were selected. So stay tuned!

The second challenge, the Truth Challenge, closes on May 26, 2016, and was designed in collaboration with the Genome in a Bottle consortium and the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health. Participants are expected to identify genetic variants in one known and one unknown sample dataset. The goal is to see how close they come to the truth when analyzing data from a human sample with variant results unknown to them, which we will reveal at the end of the challenge. An exciting characteristic of this challenge is that the Genome in a Bottle consortium will release for the first time new high confidence variant calls for the unknown sample dataset (we refer to in this challenge as “truth dataset”) for the human sample at the end of the contest.

Elaine Johanson

Elaine Johanson, precisionFDA Project Manager and Deputy Director of FDA’s Office of Health Informatics.

The knowledge generation potential for precisionFDA is immense, and leverages the collaboration of the global community to help solve challenges that will ultimately provide insight to regulation to ensure the safety and efficacy of genetic tests. The platform offers users the ability to assemble and run apps, learn from other experts, share lessons learned, participate in competitions, and help to develop standards for assessing the effectiveness of genetic tests.

With new challenges and opportunities for ongoing discussions and collaborations between FDA and the global community, we look forward to the precisionFDA community facilitating and advancing development and assessment of new tools and tests in this fast growing field of genetic testing.

 

Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S., is FDA’s Chief Health Informatics Officer (CHIO) and Director of FDA’s Office of Health Informatics

Zivana Tezak, Ph.D., is Associate Director for Science and Technology at FDA’s Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health, Center for Devices and Radiological Health

Elaine Johanson, is precisionFDA Project Manager and Deputy Director of FDA’s Office of Health Informatics

Protecting Trade in Safe Food is a Global Concern

By: Sharon Mayl and Debbie Subera-Wiggin

Protecting consumers from contaminated foods is a global concern—as well as a key FDA priority. This was clear to us when we attended a World Trade Organization (WTO) conference in Geneva earlier this spring to provide outreach on FDA’s new food safety regulations.

Debbie Subera-Wiggin, left, and Sharon Mayl at the World Trade Organization meeting in Geneva.

Debbie Subera-Wiggin, left, and Sharon Mayl at the World Trade Organization meeting in Geneva.

This was the 65th meeting of the WTO’s Committee for Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS), an important body that provides a forum for the discussion of food safety and animal and plant health issues that affect the international food trade. While enhancing free trade is WTO’s focus, members understand the importance of facilitating trade in safe food products.

Working with the WTO Secretariat, the U.S. Mission in Geneva and the Office of the United States Trade Representative, we shared information about the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) rules that aim to help ensure the safety of foods exported to the United States. It was exciting to look out at the audience and see public health and trade officials from more than 33 countries and international organizations seeking to learn more about the new food safety regulations.

The United States has been a member of the WTO, which has 162 member nations and observer organizations, since 1995. Under the auspices of this SPS Committee, U.S. trade and regulatory agencies, including FDA, work with governments worldwide on trade issues related to food safety. Their work includes ensuring that the regulations of each nation support the rights and obligations of WTO agreements.

FDA incorporates these obligations into our regulatory process, specifically to ensure that our regulations are risk- and science-based, are created through a transparent process, and are equitable to both domestic and foreign producers, while protecting public health. The WTO SPS Committee is an ideal international venue for sharing information on FDA’s food safety rules.

Our job during this meeting was to share insights on three of the new FSMA rules — in particular, produce safety, foreign supplier verification programs, and accredited third-party certification.

We were very impressed by the interest that the countries’ representatives had in these rules. More than 50 representatives even skipped their lunch to participate in the outreach session and many returned that evening, after the main session closed, to continue the discussion!

WTO members are interested in understanding and meeting the regulatory requirements in FSMA rules so that they can continue to ship safe products to the U.S. Several of the participants expressed their government’s support for working cooperatively with us to strengthen food safety controls.

We left the outreach session with a better understanding that our trading partners are highly motivated to put mechanisms in place that will help their producers and manufacturers comply with the FSMA rules and contribute to robust trade partnerships.

Sharon Mayl, J.D., is a Senior Advisor for Policy in FDA’s Office of Food and Veterinary Medicine; Debbie Subera-Wiggin is a Consumer Safety Officer on the International Affairs Staff in FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

What We Mean When We Talk About EvGen Part II: Building Out a National System for Evidence Generation

By: Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H., and Robert M. Califf, M.D.

In an earlier FDA Voice blog post, we discussed a pair of concepts – interoperability and connectivity – that are essential prerequisites for the creation of a successful national system for evidence generation (or “EvGen”). In this post, we take a look at how we would apply these constructs as we go about building such a system.

Building EvGen

Rachel Sherman

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., MPH, is FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

Creating knowledge requires the application of proven analytical methods and techniques to biomedical data in order to produce reliable conclusions. Until recently, such analysis was done by experts operating in centers that typically restricted access to data. This “walled garden” approach evolved for several reasons: the imperative to protect the privacy and confidentiality of sensitive medical data; concern about the negative consequences that could arise from inappropriate, biased, or incompetent analysis; and, the tendency to see data as a competitive asset. Regardless of the specific reason, the result has been the same: widespread and systemic barriers to data sharing.

If we are to reverse these tendencies and foster a new approach to creating evidence of the kind envisioned for EvGen, we must bear in mind several critical principles:

  1. There must be a common approach to how data is presented, reported and analyzed and strict methods for ensuring patient privacy and data security.
  2. Rules of engagement must be transparent and developed through a process that builds consensus across the relevant ecosystem and its stakeholders.
  3. To ensure support across a diverse ecosystem that often includes competing priorities and incentives, the system’s output must be intended for the public good and be readily accessible to all stakeholders.

What Would EvGen Look Like in Practice?

Robert Califf

Robert M. Califf, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

What would a robust national platform for evidence generation look like? It may be helpful to envision EvGen as an umbrella for all activities that help inform all stakeholders about making treatment decisions.

The task of evaluating drugs, biologics, or devices encompasses different data needs and methods. However, all share a common attribute: the characterization of individuals and populations and their associated clinical outcomes after they have undergone diagnostic or prognostic testing or been exposed to a therapeutic intervention.

Moreover, when medical practice itself is part of the evaluation, characterization of the organization and function of delivery systems is critical. In other words, the kinds of evidence needed to evaluate medical products for safety and effectiveness and the kinds of evidence needed to guide medical practice overlap substantially.

Over the last decade, there has been enormous progress in the area of “secondary use,” in which data collected for one purpose (for instance, as part of routine clinical care) can be reused for another (such as research, safety monitoring, or quality improvement).

The Sentinel Initiative, launched in response to a Congressional mandate to develop an active postmarket risk identification and analysis system, is one example. Modeled after successful programs such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Vaccine Safety Datalink, Sentinel allows FDA to conduct safety surveillance by actively querying diverse data sources, primarily administrative and insurance claims databases but also data from electronic health record (EHR) systems, to evaluate possible medical product safety issues quickly and securely.

Another example, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet), is a national system that includes many of the attributes needed for EvGen. PCORnet includes participation from government, industry, academia, and patients and their advocates. Whereas FDA’s Sentinel system is built primarily on claims data repurposed for safety surveillance, PCORnet is designed to leverage EHR data in support of pragmatic clinical research.

The NIH’s Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory has demonstrated through its Distributed Research Network that the concept of secondary data use can be extended into the realm of prospective pragmatic interventional trials. The NIH Collaboratory program, which includes many of the same health care systems involved in Sentinel and PCORnet, has 10 active trials underway.

In addition, the Reagan-Udall Foundation Innovation in Medical Evidence Development and Surveillance (IMEDS) Evaluation Program is exploring governance mechanisms to ensure that private-sector entities, notably regulated industry, can collaborate with Sentinel data partners to sponsor safety queries about marketed medical products. Such measures have the potential to expand the involvement of private-sector partners beyond the arena of methodology, further helping to ensure that Sentinel continues its expansion into a national resource.

Similarly, efforts are underway to establish a National Device Evaluation System (NDES). As currently envisioned, the NDES would be established through strategic alliances and shared governance. The system would build upon and leverage information from electronic real-world data sources, such as data gathered through routine clinical practice in device registries, claims data, and EHRs, with linkages activated among specific data sources as appropriate to address specific questions.

As substantial work already is being done in all of these areas, valuable experience is being gained. The next step is to ensure that these pioneering efforts coalesce into a true national resource. More on that in future postings.

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H., is FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

Robert M. Califf, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration