In India, With Our Sleeves Rolled Up

By: Howard Sklamberg and Michael Taylor

Howard Sklamberg

Howard Sklamberg

These facts surprise many people, but roughly 80 percent of active pharmaceutical ingredients, 40 percent of finished drugs, 80 percent of seafood, 50 percent of fresh fruit and 20 percent of fresh vegetables come from outside of the U.S.

Each year, the FDA has to assess millions of products grown, harvested, processed, manufactured and shipped from outside of the U.S. And one of the most impressive examples of how this globalization of production, consumption and trade has altered the regulatory landscape is India.

India is quickly becoming a significant player in the global marketplace, representing an important source of FDA‐regulated products. With a diverse population, highly skilled work force, and favorable economic conditions, India has become an increasingly attractive location for companies to operate.

Michael Taylor

Michael Taylor

And with that, Indian regulators have become important strategic partners for FDA. Today, we regularly engage with them on everything from sharing information on clinical trials to collaboratively addressing product safety issues that may harm American consumers.

When Commissioner Hamburg visited the country last year, she remarked that the “rapid globalization of commerce has posed significant challenges to ensuring consumer safety as the number of suppliers entering the U.S. has increased.” On her visit she signed a milestone Statement of Intent between our two countries  seeking to “collectively work together to improve the lines of communication between our agencies and work diligently to ensure that the products being exported from India are safe and of high quality.”

We are eager to continue the work she started. And improving the lines of communication of which she spoke is the purpose  of our working visit to India. Before the trip we discussed with our teams what we expect from our journey. Our top goal is to listen and learn. We want to understand what challenges the Indian government is facing with regard to drug and food safety. We want to hear from both American companies operating in India, as well as Indian manufacturers. And we want to discuss with our Indian counterparts a number of significant changes in the American regulatory system that affect our relationship.

FDA’s Howard Sklamberg, Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations & Policy, and Cynthia Schnedar, Director, Office of Compliance at CDER, meet with Dr. G.N. Singh, Drugs Controller General of India.

FDA’s Howard Sklamberg, Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations & Policy, and Cynthia Schnedar, Director, Office of Compliance at CDER, meet with Dr. G.N. Singh, Drugs Controller General of India. Get this and other photos from FDA’s trip to India on Flickr.

It is no secret that relationship has been challenged in the recent past by lapses of quality at a handful of pharmaceutical firms. And while our first regulatory responsibility is to protect the American patient and consumer, we are also very willing to collaborate with Indian regulators and other stakeholders to ensure the achievement of highest standards of safety and quality, something we feel only benefits both nations.

We have harvested some of the fruits of this cooperation already. A significant example of collaboration between the U.S. and India occurred in 2012, when a Salmonella outbreak was traced to a manufacturer in India. An FDA inspection confirmed that the tuna product implicated in the outbreak came from the suspect facility, and the Indian government revoked the manufacturer’s license.

In yet another case, FDA’s India office worked with other United States government agencies to inform industry and Indian regulators about issues associated with an import alert for Basmati rice from India. The FDA office shared laboratory procedures for testing of pesticides.

More recently, in November of 2014, as a continuation of FDA’s efforts to strengthen the quality, safety and integrity of imported drugs, the FDA India Office, in collaboration with our Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Office of Compliance and the Office of Regulatory Affairs, held four workshops in India.  The workshops were held in partnership with European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and Drug Information Association and involved the Indian Drug Manufacturers Association, Parenteral Drug Association and Organization of Pharmaceutical Producers of India. Over 560 participants from the pharmaceutical industry attended the four two-day workshops.

We are confident our trip will yield more examples of such fruitful collaboration, moving the regulatory relationship between two of the world’s largest democracies to the next stage, from the intention to work together, to the ability to work together to solve the complex globalization issues facing both nations.

Howard Sklamberg is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

New Law Enhances Safety of Compounded Drugs and Protection of the Drug Supply Chain

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Since last year’s tragic meningitis outbreak and subsequent events involving compounded drugs, Congress has been hard at work to pass new legislation to provide FDA with the appropriate authorities for regulating compounded drugs to help make these products safe for the American public.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Over a much longer period of time, efforts have been made in Congress to enhance the security of the drug supply chain and protect consumers from exposure to counterfeit, stolen, contaminated or otherwise harmful drugs.

I am pleased that the Drug Quality and Security Act can help FDA protect public health in both of these critical areas.

One part of the new law offers a step forward in FDA’s oversight of certain entities that prepare compounded drugs. The new law will enable these compounders to register with the FDA to become “outsourcing facilities,” making them subject to certain other requirements including Federal quality standards, known as current good manufacturing practice. These facilities will also be subject to inspection by FDA on a risk-based schedule. If compounders register with FDA as outsourcers, hospitals and other health care providers will be able to provide their patients with drugs that were compounded in facilities that are subject to FDA oversight and federal requirements for current good manufacturing practice, among others. To that end, we will be encouraging healthcare providers and health networks to consider purchasing compounded products from facilities that are registered with FDA and subject to risk based inspections.

Drugs produced by compounders that are not registered as outsourcing facilities must meet certain other conditions described in the law, or they will be regulated by FDA as conventional drug manufacturers.

Generally, the state boards of pharmacy will continue to have primary responsibility for the day-to-day oversight of state licensed pharmacies, including traditional pharmacy compounding. And FDA will continue to cooperate with state authorities to address pharmacy compounding activities that may be in violation of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act.

Another part of the new law enables certain prescription drugs to be traced as they move through the U.S. drug supply chain. The goal is to protect the public from exposure to counterfeit, stolen, or otherwise harmful drugs. This will require manufacturers, repackagers, wholesale drug distributors, and dispensers (other than most licensed health care practitioners) to provide product and transaction information with each sale and notify the FDA and other stakeholders of illegitimate products, which will result in improved detection and removal of potentially dangerous drugs from the supply chain.

Starting four years after enactment of the law, manufacturers, followed by repackagers, will be required to affix a unique product identifier to each drug package that contains the drug’s national drug code (NDC), serial number, lot number, and expiration date. Starting six years after enactment of the law, wholesale drug distributors, followed by dispensers, may only trade products that  are encoded with product identifiers and will be able to verify the product identifier if they determine that they have  suspect product. Ten years after enactment, supply chain stakeholders and FDA will benefit from an electronic, interoperable system which will facilitate the efficient exchange of product and transaction information for prescription drugs at the individual package level. The system, when fully implemented, will enable verification of the legitimacy of the drug product identifier down to the package level, enhanced detection and notification of illegitimate product, and improved efficiency of recalls.

The Drug Quality and Security Act is a significant step toward having new and stronger drug quality and safety laws. While the law does not provide FDA with all the additional authorities sought, these provisions are a sign of progress.

We are committed and prepared to implement the new law that will help us to further protect public health.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration