FDA Working to Keep Patients Well Informed

By: Steve L. Morin R.N., B.S.N.

Steve Morin_2823My job in the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs (OHCA) is to serve our nation’s patients in two ways: by listening to their concerns regarding FDA’s policy and decision-making and advocating for them in our agency;  and by informing many patients and patient organizations about FDA’s mission and its work to advance the development, evaluation and approval of new therapeutic products.

This dialogue was formalized and greatly expanded in 2012 when, after a series of listening sessions with many patient advocacy organizations, OHCA created the Patient Network.

Specifically designed for patients, caregivers, patient advocates and disease-specific patient advocacy organizations and the communities that advocate on their behalf, this program serves two goals. It facilitates patient engagement with FDA policy and decision makers, and it educates its audience about the process that brings new medications – both prescription and over-the-counter ­– and medical devices from a concept to the marketplace.

Our Patient Network covers a range of FDA-specific topics and conducts numerous activities that are of interest to patients and patient advocates. One of these activities were webinars with information about upcoming public meetings hosted by FDA.

For example on March 31, 2014, OHCA was pleased to host the first-of-its-kind “LiveChat” with the diabetes community. This online discussion gave patients an opportunity to interact with FDA experts and to better understand a recently released draft guidance dealing with the studies and criteria that FDA recommends be used when submitting premarket notifications (510(k)s) for blood glucose meters.

On September 10, 2014, our Third Annual Patient Network Meeting titled “Under the Microscope: Pediatric Product Development” brought together more than 100 patients, patient advocates, representatives of academia and industry, and FDA leaders. The participants discussed pediatric product development and the ways patient advocates can participate in it.

And on September 17, 2014, our Patient Network webpages were upgraded. The “For Patients” section on FDA’s website is presented in a clear manner with easy-to-use formats. Also, a “For Patients” button is located on our homepage.

We have continued to pursue our goals of informing the public and engaging with patients by building upon the patient-centered webpages and enhancing activities that express our desire to be helpful and transparent. This is our philosophy that has helped the Patient Network evolve to what you see today.

As the Patient Network program continues to grow, I hope to expand it to have more interactive webinars like the “LiveChat” that address specific concerns  of the patient communities. Also, we will continue to make it possible for patients to learn from FDA experts who approve medical products.

The FDA realizes that listening to the “patient voice” and conducting our dialogue is important, and it continues to develop its model for patient involvement through the Patient-Focused Drug Development Meetings and other OHCA sponsored meetings and webinars. We hope patients and those who care for them will join us in that effort, and make it still more helpful in protecting and promoting the public health.

Steve L. Morin, R.N., B.S.N., is a Commander of the United States Public Health Service and the Manager of the Patient Network in FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs

FDA Commemorates 30th Anniversary of the Orphan Drug Act

By: Gayatri R. Rao, M.D., J.D.

Gayatri R. Rao, M.D., J.D., is Director of FDA's Office of Orphan Products Development

When President Reagan signed the Orphan Drug Act 30 years ago, he enacted a critically important piece of health care legislation. The passage of this Act on January 4, 1983, was monumental because it created—for the first time—incentives to develop desperately needed medical products for Americans suffering with rare diseases. Until that point, development of such products was very limited. For instance, in the decade leading up to the passage of the Orphan Drug Act, only 10 industry-supported products for rare diseases were brought to market.

The Office of Orphan Products Development (OOPD) was formed at FDA more than 30 years ago, prior to the passage of the Orphan Drug Act, because FDA recognized that rare diseases, when taken together, posed a significant national public health issue. Once the Orphan Drug Act was passed, OOPD became responsible for administering the incentive programs created to spur the development of medical products for rare diseases, namely the Orphan Drug Designation Program and the Orphan Products Grants Program. These products include drugs, biologics, medical devices, and medical foods for the treatment of rare diseases.

As FDA commemorates the passage of this important legislation, we look back over the last 30 years with pride. Since its passage, over 2700 products in development have been designated as orphan drugs through the Orphan Drug Designation Program and over $290 million has been awarded to clinical studies through the Orphan Products Grants Program.  These programs, along with the critical, collective efforts of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s (CDER) Rare Diseases Program, and those of many individuals across FDA, have helped to bring over 400 orphan products for rare diseases to the market.

We also commemorate the more than 30 years of dedicated service from every member of the rare disease community:

  • the patient advocates, who spurred national awareness about the challenges that people with rare diseases face and who continue to support families, educate the community, and drive research into their diseases;
  • the legislators who heard the voices of rare disease advocates and worked to champion the passage of the Orphan Drug Act;
  • the research community, which continues to leverage resources and foster collaborations among academia and industry stakeholders;
  • the clinicians, who support the medical needs of families with rare diseases and work to advocate on behalf of the community;
  • and industry, including pharmaceutical and biotech companies, angel investors, and venture capitalists who, in the spirit of the Orphan Drug Act, have come together to develop products for rare diseases.

Our many successes give us a reason to celebrate 30 years of hard work to provide diagnostic or treatment options to those with rare diseases. But we are keenly aware that there is still a challenging road ahead. We at FDA remain firmly committed to working with the rare disease community to tackle those challenges and to find new diagnostic tools and treatments for the millions of patients with rare diseases.

Gayatri R. Rao, M.D., J.D., is Director for The Office of Orphan Products Development