FDA and Health Professionals, Safeguarding the Public’s Health

By: Anna M. Fine, Pharm.D.

At our recent third annual Health Professional Organizations Conference, some of FDA’s most senior leaders exchanged views and discussed issues of mutual interest with senior representatives from key health professional organizations.

Anna FineHeld on FDA’s White Oak campus in Silver Spring, Md., and organized by the FDA’s Office of Health & Constituent Affairs (OHCA), the event was attended by 30 professional organizations representing physicians, nurses, physician assistants, dentists, optometrists, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and others.

An open and ongoing dialogue between these professionals and FDA is a vital part of addressing many important public health issues. In her opening remarks, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg offered a few examples, such as health professionals’ contributions to the FDA’s MedWatch and Adverse Event Reporting programs and their work in interpreting and addressing medical products’ safety signals. A drug’s safety profile is continually evaluated after FDA approval, and health professionals are encouraged to report suspected adverse events to FDA which allows FDA to conduct comprehensive safety evaluations. Dr. Hamburg also emphasized the importance of health professionals’ engagement in regulatory science research, which provides essential support for the agency’s decisions and ability to bring innovative products to market.

Mitch Zeller, the Director of FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, speaking at the third annual Health Professional Organizations Conference, on May 14, 2014

Mitch Zeller, Director of FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, speaking at the agency’s third annual Health Professional Organizations Conference. See more photos of this event on Flickr.

Key FDA leaders who gave presentations throughout the day included Mitch Zeller, the Director of FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products; Dr. Stephen Ostroff, Acting Chief FDA Scientist; and Dr. Peter Lurie, Acting Associate Commissioner of FDA’s Office of Planning and Policy.

In addition, senior scientists from FDA’s centers for drugs, medical devices and food discussed FDA’s priorities and answered questions from the audience. The robust dialogue between the panel members and our stakeholders covered many public health issues including youth and tobacco and FDA’s proposed changes to the food label.

Feedback from the audience highlights the need for such a conference.

“It’s great to have this dialogue with FDA officials. It demonstrates that they respect our organizations and want our feedback,” said one stakeholder representative.

“I love coming to these annual meetings, not only to meet FDA personnel but to talk with colleagues in other professions. This is a one-of-a-kind forum,” said another.

As a pharmacist and team leader within OHCA, I can attest to the fact that my FDA colleagues and I benefited as well. We learned a lot about our stakeholders’ concerns and established new connections with health professional organizations—contacts that we plan to follow-up on to explore new opportunities for mutual cooperation and collaboration in the interest of the public health.

Anna M. Fine, Pharm.D., is Director of the Health Professional Liaison Program in FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs.

FDA Goes 3-D

By Steven K. Pollack, Ph.D., and James Coburn, M.S.

Dr. Steven Pollack (left) holds a 3D-printed RoboHand, a prosthetic for children with amnionic banding syndrome, an illness that can prevent fingers from developing in children. Research engineer James Coburn (right) uses the 3-D printer (background) in his work in the FDA lab.

Dr. Steven Pollack (left) holds a 3D-printed RoboHand, a prosthetic for children with amnionic banding syndrome, an illness that can prevent fingers from developing in children. Research engineer James Coburn (right) uses the 3-D printer (background) in his work in the FDA lab.

This Snap-Together RoboHand Prosthetic, sized for a small child, was created at FDA with a 3-D printer.

The Snap-Together RoboHand prosthetic was invented by South African carpenter Richard van As and made available for free on the Internet. Before printing, the hand can be individually sized, and all connecting pieces are also printed. The device can now be printed for less than $100.

A hospital in Michigan implants a 3-D printed medical device into a 3-month-old boy with a rare bronchial condition and saves a young life.

A man has 75 percent of his skull replaced with a 3-D printed implant.

3-D printing—the process of making a three-dimensional solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model—is making headlines these days, and the technology, once considered the wave of the future, is rapidly becoming part of the present.

It’s spurring innovation in manufacturing, dramatically reducing the time required to design new products and allowing designs to be built that were not possible before.

Here at FDA, we’re using it to expand our research efforts and expand our capabilities to review innovative medical products. In fact, 3-D printing is fast becoming a focus in our practice of regulatory science—that is, the science of developing new tools, standards and approaches to assess the safety, effectiveness, quality and performance of FDA-regulated products.

With 3-D printing, the conversion from a virtual computer model to a physical object can occur almost in real time. The printer translates virtual models into digital cross-sections for use as a blueprint for printing, laying down successive layers in different shapes.

FDA Research Engineer James Coburn operates a RapMan kit 3D printer.

James Coburn adjusts the tension on the feed mechanism for the ABS plastic filament that is the raw material for the RapMan kit 3D printer.

Two laboratories in the FDA’s Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories (OSEL) are investigating how the technology may affect the manufacturing of medical devices in the future.

At our Functional Performance and Device Use Laboratory we’ve developed and adapted computer-modeling methods to help us determine the effect of design changes on the safety and performance of devices when used in different patient populations. The 3-D technology enables us to tweak the design in ways large and small, and to see precisely how those tweaks will change both fit and functionality. In an era of increasingly personalized medicine, which involves the development of treatments that are tailored to an individual patient or a group that shares certain characteristics, including anatomical features, it helps us to fine-tune our evaluation of patient-fitted products.

At our Laboratory for Solid Mechanics we’re investigating how different printing techniques and processes affect the strength and durability of the materials used in medical devices. What we’re discovering will be valuable to our reviews of devices down the road; it will help us to develop standards and set parameters for scale, materials, and other critical aspects that contribute to product safety and innovation.

In August 2012, President Obama launched the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII), a national effort bringing together industry, universities and the federal government to provide innovation infrastructure to support new technologies and products created with additive manufacturing, the formal term for 3-D printing.

FDA has a long history of researching and regulating innovative technological practices. Regulators regularly review some of the newest technologies coming onto the market and, through our research, FDA has first-hand knowledge of these advanced techniques so we can evaluate advanced technology at an early stage—a crucial step in facilitating innovation and protecting the public health. We will continue to facilitate device innovation and keep on the cutting edge of technology and regulatory science to help ensure that the products we regulate are safe and effective.

To see more photos of how FDA is using 3-D printing technology, visit our Flickr photostream.

Steven K. Pollack, Ph.D. is Director of FDA’s Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories (OSEL) at FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. James Coburn, M.S. is a Research Engineer in OSEL.