SCORE at Six Months: Meeting the Challenge of Complex Recalls

By: Stephen Ostroff, M.D., and Howard Sklamberg, J.D.

When a potentially contaminated food is on the market, time is of the essence to keep people from becoming ill. Yet there are times when it is difficult to determine what actions should be taken. This can happen when we do not have enough information to reach a clear decision.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

To better address these situations, in April FDA established a team of senior leaders that is brought in to make decisions in the most challenging cases. The team is called SCORE, which originally stood for Strategic Coordinated Outbreak Response and Evaluation, but it soon became clear that the scope of its work is broader than outbreaks. The team looks at cases in which recalls and other actions may be needed, even when there are no reports that people have fallen ill. So SCORE now stands for Strategic Coordinated Oversight of Recall Execution.

And we’re happy to report that SCORE is already making a difference, helping to overcome obstacles and streamlining processes to get potentially harmful foods off the market as soon as possible to reduce further consumer exposure.

In the last six months, SCORE has reviewed and directed operations in cases that include flour contaminated with peanut protein, (a major food allergen), facilities contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, pistachios in which Salmonella was detected, and baby food that was not manufactured in compliance with infant formula regulations. All of these cases resulted in recalls and announcements issued by the firms and FDA.

Howard Sklamberg

Howard Sklamberg, J.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

SCORE was launched, in part, in response to concerns raised by the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General about FDA’s ability to ensure that companies initiate voluntary recalls in a prompt and effective manner. While FDA staff were already helping to facilitate thousands of prompt and successful voluntary recalls, we recognized the need for an enhanced response in certain, more complex cases.

In the cases brought to the team, we believe that SCORE has helped determine the right course of action and shorten recall timeframes, getting the products off the market faster. SCORE has helped improve tactical planning, leading to additional inspections and sampling assignments, and to getting the word out to more consumers about potentially dangerous products. In one case, FDA suspended a food facility’s registration after a reinspection and additional sampling requested by SCORE showed continued contamination. Suspension of registration effectively shuts a facility down until FDA determines that there is no longer a reasonable probability that foods produced there will cause serious illnesses or death.

We set individual deadlines and got prompt results in these, and other, instances. FDA staff are seeing these actions as a model for their efforts going forward.

FDA has been evolving over the past few years into an agency that speaks with one voice in its oversight of food safety. SCORE’s membership includes leaders from within the directorates of Foods and Veterinary Medicine and Global Regulatory Operations and Policy, in addition to the Office of the Chief Counsel. The spectrum of expertise covers inspections and investigations, compliance and enforcement, policy, legal, communications, outbreak response and, most important, science.

This team is in its infancy but the results it has achieved thus far signal an integrated approach to food recalls that will help ensure a swift response no matter what obstacles arise. The arrival of the compliance dates for the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act rules overseeing the safety of domestic and imported foods are putting additional food safety controls in place to help reduce food contamination. And the work of SCORE and its colleagues will continue.

SCORE’s goals for the next year include identifying and closing gaps that slow the process of determining whether a food is a threat to public health or interfere with identifying the right actions to take in response to potential contamination. Our ultimate goal is to continue to improve our ability to protect consumers from contaminated food.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine, and Howard Sklamberg, J.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy.

Talking Across International Borders About FSMA

By: Michael R. Taylor

Michael R. TaylorAll countries face the challenges presented by a food supply that is increasingly global, and consumers rightfully expect that the food they eat is safe no matter where it comes from. We all have the same goals: safe food, consumer confidence, and efficient and effective oversight to reach those goals.

With that in mind, our partnerships with foreign food producers and our regulatory counterparts in other countries are increasingly important. As we get closer to releasing the final rules that will implement the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), we are reaching across borders to ensure that our international stakeholders have the information and training they need to meet these new standards.

The need for this international outreach is a message that came through loud and clear at a public meeting this April on FSMA implementation. The feedback from agricultural attaches, overseas business owners, and representatives from governments worldwide was that they want to hear more about what to expect, and how to prepare for what’s ahead.

To address these concerns, we invited representatives of foreign embassies and other international stakeholders to attend a roundtable discussion on June 23, 2015. In the attached video, you’ll see both the optimism and concerns that surfaced during the meeting at FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in College Park, Md.


On June 23, 2015, FDA held a meeting of representatives of foreign embassies and international stakeholders involved in implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). This is the fifth video blog in which the people who will be helping to make FSMA a reality share their insights on challenges, opportunities and next steps. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)


One sentiment, expressed at the meeting, was: “The United States isn’t the only country concerned about food safety.” From FDA’s perspective, we’re counting on that as we build the partnerships we’ll need to help ensure the safety of foods all over the world. We will join forces with agriculture and public health officials in other countries, international industries and associations, multilateral organizations, and academia to address the unique needs of foreign food producers who must comply with the new FSMA regulations.

We’re operating under the premise that the vast majority of food producers, both foreign and domestic, want to ensure the safety of their foods. We will be relying on our international partners to help us find ways to provide solid verification that the FSMA standards are being met.

The earliest compliance dates will be a year after we publish the first final rules this summer. In the meantime, we are working with our public and private partners to develop training for domestic and international food producers. These partners include the U.S. Department of Agriculture, grower and local food system groups, and the Food Safety Preventive Controls and Produce Safety alliances, whose members include the FDA, local and state regulatory agencies, the food industry, and academia.

We are committed to making FSMA implementation as open and transparent a process as possible. The April public meeting and the June roundtable discussion were just two steps in that process. But they were important steps because both provided open and frank conversations.

We’ve got a long road ahead. We’ve long worked with other countries as trading and regulatory partners. Now, we aspire to be food safety partners, working together and supporting each other when problems arise. These partnerships ultimately will benefit consumers all over the world.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

FDA Science Forum 2015: Views of FDA

FDA’s 2015 Science Forum attracted more than 800 people from the scientific community. Here’s what some attendees said about the innovative research going on at the agency and why FDA can be a valuable collaborator in research aimed at transforming food safety and medical product development. If you couldn’t attend the FDA science forum, you can still see all the presentations on our web site.

Looking at the Road Ahead for FSMA

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. And in this last of four video blogs, they share their insights on next steps as FDA moves from rule-making to implementation. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face.)

Thinking About FSMA Issues

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. And in this third of four video blogs, they share their insights on the challenges ahead as FDA moves from rule-making to implementation. The next blog focuses on next steps. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

Continuing the Conversation About FSMA

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. And in this second of four video blogs, they share their insights on the opportunities that FSMA makes possible for the global food safety system. The next blogs focus on challenges and momentum. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

Coming Together to Talk About FSMA

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. This first of four video blogs focuses on the insights of FDA leaders. Over the next few weeks, the blogs will share the insights of FDA experts and other meeting participants, both in the government and the private sector, on the opportunities, challenges and momentum that FSMA presents. (The second video is Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

FSMA: The Future Is Now – Stakeholder Perspectives

On April 23-24, 2015, FDA hosted the “FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Public Meeting: Focus on Implementation Strategy for Prevention-Oriented Food Safety Standards.” The national public meeting in Washington, D.C., continued on the second day with a panel discussion on stakeholder perspectives.

Participants: Sandra Eskin, J.D., Director, Food Safety, The Pew Charitable Trust; Leon Bruner, D.V.M., Ph.D., Executive Vice President for Scientific and Regulatory Affairs and Chief Science Officer, Grocery Manufacturers Association; Marsha Echols, J.D., Legal Advisor, Specialty Food Association; Richard Sellers, Senior Vice President of Legislative and Regulatory Affairs, American Feed Industry Association; David Gombas, Ph.D., Senior Vice President of Food Safety and Technology, United Fresh Produce Association; Sophia Kruszewski, J.D., Policy Specialist, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition; Stephanie Barnes, J.D., Regulatory Counsel, Food Marketing Institute. Moderator: Roberta Wagner, Director for Regulatory Affairs, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, FDA.

FSMA: The Future Is Now

By: Michael R. Taylor

FDA is holding the “FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Public Meeting: Focus on Implementation Strategy for Prevention-Oriented Food Safety Standards.” The two-day national public meeting in Washington, D.C., began Thursday, April 23, 2015 with a panel discussion by top FDA leaders on the overarching philosophy and strategy. Participants: Michael Taylor, J.D., Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine; Howard Sklamberg, J.D., Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy; Melinda Plaisier, M.S.W., Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs, Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy; Susan Mayne, Ph.D., Director, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition; Bernadette Dunham, D.V.M., Ph.D., Director, Center for Veterinary Medicine. Moderator: Kari Barrett, Advisor for Strategic Communications and Public Engagement, FDA

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

FDA’s Keynote Address to the Annual Conference of the Food and Drug Law Institute

By Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

Today marks the start of my third week as Acting Commissioner of FDA and I “celebrated” by giving a keynote address to attendees at the annual conference of the Food and Drug Law Institute (FDLI). Few places offer a more appropriate stage for a newly designated leader of FDA. As our names suggest, our organizations have a lot in common.

Stephen OstroffFor decades, the FDA and FDLI have worked together to educate and inform the broad “food and drug” community about the latest developments in our field and FDA’s critical and complex role in promoting and protecting the public health.

It’s been an exciting, busy, and rewarding first three weeks since moving into my new office from the position of Chief Scientist. The FDLI annual meeting offered me the opportunity to highlight a number of FDA’s accomplishments over the last year. The credit for these achievements in no small measure goes to the immensely talented employees at FDA who are committed to assuring safe and nutritious foods, providing effective and high quality medical products, and reducing harm from tobacco products. Credit for these achievements also reflects the extraordinary leadership of my predecessor, Dr. Peggy Hamburg, over the last 6 years.

So today, I’m pleased and honored to present to this audience some of FDA’s accomplishments and challenges, and also to extend my sincere appreciation to FDA’s dedicated work force, who make my new job much easier. But much more importantly, our work force makes the lives of so many Americans safer and healthier. It is with great pride that I look forward to continuing to work with all of you in support of this noble goal.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., is Acting Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration