Protecting the Global Drug Supply: FDASIA Title VII

By: Howard Sklamberg, J.D.

Since July 9, 2012, when President Obama signed the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), a group of my colleagues and I have had an urgent mission: implement Title VII of the statute. This section gave FDA new authority to better protect the global drug supply chain, which is a critically important public health task in an increasingly global marketplace.

Howard SklambergTitle VII will advance FDA’s transformation into a global public health agency, primarily by enabling it to better oversee the safety and integrity of drug ingredients and finished drugs in the supply chain. Thanks to this law, FDA can become better informed about supply chain risks.  This information allows FDA to target its resources to higher risk facilities, which makes us both more efficient and more effective in further ensuring the quality and safety of drug ingredients and finished drugs.  The law also provides us with important new enforcement tools and facilitates our cooperation with trusted foreign regulators, which is essential in a global marketplace.

FDA is working diligently to implement these authorities to better protect and promote the health of all Americans. In the past two years, FDA has made many parts of Title VII a reality. These successful accomplishments include:

  • proposed and a final rule to extend the agency’s administrative detention authority to include drugs, (Section 709, issued 5/29/2014). The rule prevents potentially adulterated or misbranded drugs from entering U.S. commerce while FDA decides whether to take such legal action as seizing the drug. Administrative detention is a particularly useful tool when there is a high likelihood that the drug will be moved before we can apply another enforcement tool. It aligns with FDA’s administrative detention authority for food and medical devices.
  • a draft guidance defining what the agency considers to be actions that delay, deny, or limit an inspection. (Section 707, issued 7/9/2013) In crafting this guidance, FDA surveyed its field force to come up with the types of behaviors that were observed by investigators, based on real-life situations. This authority has already been used to warn firms of possible enforcement action in instances when FDA was not allowed to inspect.
  • a public meeting was held to discuss how the agency might implement certain parts of FDASIA to protect the drug supply chain. (Sections 713/714, held July 12, 2013).  FDA is dedicated to providing transparency and ongoing opportunities for stakeholder input and participation as it works to implement Title VII.
  • a draft guidance specifying the unique facility identifier (UFI) system for drug establishment registration. (Sections 701/702, issued 9/5/2013)
    This data standard will improve our ability to identify drug establishments, both here and abroad, that make products for the U.S. market.
  • the first annual report as required under section 705, outlining the number of domestic and foreign establishments registered and inspected in fiscal year 2013 and the percentage of the FDA budget used to fund such inspections. (Section 705, issued 1/31/2014. This report provides a high level overview of FDA inspection resources.
  • a proposed rule regarding administrative destruction of imported drugs refused admission into the U.S. (Section 708, issued 5/6/2014)
    This authority will allow destruction of unsafe drugs valued at less than $2,500, rather than the current process that requires the return of these illegal products to the country of origin, which increases the risk that further attempts could be made to send them back into the U.S.

Working together with stakeholders, FDA will continue its strategic implementation of FDASIA Title VII by prioritizing its efforts based on the maximum benefit to the public health.

You can look up the current status of any FDASIA deliverable and sign up to receive Title VII updates using FDASIA-TRACK.

Howard Sklamberg, J.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

FDASIA at Year Two

By Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Anniversaries are a time for stock-taking and today, on the second anniversary of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act or FDASIA, I’m pleased to report on the progress we’ve made implementing this multi-faceted law.

To date, we have completed nearly all of the deliverables we had scheduled for the first two years after FDASIA became law. And many of the new authorities under FDASIA are already having a positive impact on health. It’s difficult to cover all of our FDASIA work, but here are some highlights:

Preventing Drug Shortages: Drug shortages, which can have serious and immediate effects on patients and health care professionals, reached an all-time high in 2011, the year before FDASIA was enacted. In response to a Presidential Executive Order in December of that year, FDA issued an interim final rule to amend and broaden FDA regulations requiring certain manufacturers to give early notification of production interruptions that could cause drug shortages. FDASIA further broadened this requirement by requiring that other prescription drug manufacturers provide notification and also gave FDA additional authorities. In October 2013 FDA proposed a rule to implement these authorities and issued a strategic plan for addressing drug shortages. So far, with the help of early notifications, FDA was able to prevent 282 shortages in 2012 and 170 shortages in 2013. The number of drug shortages that did occur has also declined.

Promoting Innovation: FDASIA includes many provisions designed to encourage innovation. We have held meetings on the use of meta-analyses in drug applications; put in place a plan for implementing a benefit-risk framework for drug reviews, and issued a variety of guidance documents covering such topics as drug studies in children, abuse-deterrent drug development, antibacterial drug development and expedited review and development programs for serious diseases.

This latter guidance provided information that sponsors needed to know about our new Breakthrough Therapy designation that was part of FDASIA. This option exists for new drugs intended to treat a serious or life-threatening disease that, preliminary clinical evidence suggests, could provide a substantial improvement over available therapies. As of June 23, we had granted 52 requests for this designation, and of those, approved four new drugs and two new indications for previously approved drugs.

As part of our implementation of the FDASIA-related provisions related to medical devices, we proposed a strategy and recommendations for a risk-based health information technology (health IT) framework that would promote product innovation while maintaining appropriate patient protections and avoiding regulatory duplication; issued a proposed rule for implementing FDASIA’s streamlined new procedures for reclassifying a device; and published a final rule on a medical device unique identification or UDI with implementation in accordance with the timetable set in the law. UDIs will help the FDA identify product problems more quickly, better target recalls and improve patient safety. The riskiest medical devices will start bearing their UDI by September 24th.

Establishing and Strengthening User Fee Programs: An important element of FDASIA was reauthorizing user fees for prescription drugs and medical devices and creating new user fee programs for generic drugs and biosimilar biological drugs. User fees on some types of applications offer an important source of funding to support and maintain key activities, including FDA’s staff of experts who review the thousands of product submissions we receive every year. Since FDASIA took effect, review times for medical devices have been declining.  Our prescription drug user fee program is meeting or exceeding almost all of our performance goals agreed to with industry. We have acted on 54 percent of the generic drug applications, or amendments and supplements to generic drug applications which were pending in our inventory as of October 1, 2012. This helps ensure that consumers can have access to more low-cost drugs. And we have been able to provide advice concerning most of the 93 submissions from companies who are developing biosimilar biological drugs under a pathway that could also ultimately lower costs for consumers.

Enhancing Patient Engagement: A hallmark of FDASIA was a series of provisions intended to tap the patient perspective. Our Patient-Focused Drug Development Program allows us to more systematically obtain the patient’s perspective on a disease and its impact on the patients’ daily lives, the types of treatment benefit that matter most to patients, and the adequacy of the available therapies for the disease. In accordance with FDASIA, we have held patient meetings on eight diseases and have plans for meetings on 12 more. We have learned a great deal from patients in terms of their views of the symptoms of their condition, their feelings about how it affects their life, and their thoughts on ideal treatments and on participation in clinical trials to aid future drug development.  A FDA Voice blog post on patient reports captures these patient perspectives and much more.

Finally, Title VII of FDASIA provided FDA with numerous new authorities to protect the drug supply chain. We thought now was a good time to provide the public with a more detailed description of our work on Title VII, so we asked Howard Sklamberg, Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy, to write a separate blog on that topic.

FDA laid out a three-year plan for implementing FDASIA and we’re on our way to achieving our stated goals. To help the public follow our progress, we set up a dedicated webpage—the FDASIA-Track. It provides useful links to each action and is updated on a regular basis.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

A Blueprint for Helping Children with Rare Diseases

Editor’s Note: This blog has been updated to provide additional information about our use of expedited programs to speed rare disease medical product development.

By Jill Hartzler Warner, J.D.

Jill WarnerThe U.S. Congress and the Food and Drug Administration have long focused on bringing new therapies to patients with rare diseases, including children.

Two years ago this week, Congress made another contribution to this effort by enacting the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA). The law directs our agency to take two actions to further the development of new therapies for children affected by rare diseases: (1) to hold a meeting with stakeholders and discuss ways to encourage and accelerate the development of new therapies for pediatric rare diseases, and (2) issue a report that includes a strategic plan for achieving this goal.

There are unique challenges when developing drugs, biological products and medical devices for the pediatric population. Not only is there the potential for children to respond differently to products as they grow but there are also additional ethical concerns for this patient population.

But these challenges are further compounded when developing therapies for pediatric rare diseases. For example, rare disease product development, by definition, means there is only a small potential group of patients available to participate in clinical studies that can help determine whether a product is safe and effective.

In our FDASIA meeting in January, we heard a variety of suggestions on clinical trial design and data collection from hundreds of the participating stakeholders from academia; clinical and treating communities; patient and advocacy groups; industry and governmental agencies.

These discussions helped inform our Strategic Plan for Accelerating the Development of Therapies for Pediatric Rare Diseases, which we posted on our website today. It outlines how we plan to meet the following four objectives:

Enhance foundational and translational science. Our strategy is to fill essential information gaps through such measures as fostering the conduct of natural history studies for pediatric rare diseases and by identifying unmet pediatric needs in medical device development. We also plan to issue guidance for sponsors on common issues in rare disease drug development and to refine and expand the use of computational modeling for medical devices.

Strengthen communication, collaboration, and partnering. Robust cooperation within FDA, among agencies, governments and private entities is necessary to enable the exchange of information on the issues of developing treatments for pediatric rare diseases. Single entities by themselves usually don’t have sufficient resources or expertise to overcome the product development challenges posed by pediatric rare diseases.

Advance the use of regulatory science to aid clinical trial design and performance.  Regulatory science helps develop new tools, standards, and approaches to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of all FDA-regulated products. Of note, we plan to facilitate better understanding of biomarkers and clinical outcome assessments that are useful for the development of treatments for pediatric rare diseases. We also plan to further develop the expedited approval pathway for medical devices intended to treat unmet medical needs; and use FDA’s web-based resources to update and expand awareness of issues involving the development of medical products for pediatric rare diseases.

Enhance FDA’s review process. Our strategies include fostering efforts to learn patients’ and caregivers’ perspectives and incorporating this information into medical product development. We also plan to further develop and implement a structured approach to benefit-risk assessment in the drug review process and establish a patient engagement panel as part of the medical device advisory committee process.

The report notes our use of expedited programs to speed rare disease medical product development. For example, the accelerated approval program allows for approval of products to treat serious and life-threatening diseases based on an effect on a surrogate marker, such as blood test, urine marker, or an intermediate clinical endpoint, that is believed to be reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit to the patient. Under accelerated approval, further studies are required after approval to confirm that the drug provides a clinical benefit to the patient.

More than 80 new products have been approved under the accelerated approval program, and many of these have been for rare diseases. But it’s important to note that in some cases FDA exercises regulatory flexibility to approve drugs under the traditional approval pathway, rather than under the accelerated approval program. In fact, most of the recent new drug approvals for rare diseases have been approved under the traditional approval pathway because FDA has determined that the drug provides a clinical benefit to the patient. Such approvals make new drugs available to patients, and also mean that companies are not required to do confirmatory trials after approval.

FDA is committed to continuing its use of expedited programs and regulatory flexibility to speed development and approval of safe and effective drugs for all patients with rare diseases, and the strategies outlined in this plan will help us achieve a major goal of FDASIA and for our agency, which is to speed the development of therapies for children with rare diseases.

 

Jill Hartzler Warner, J.D., is FDA’s Associate Commissioner for Special Medical Programs

Ensuring Pharmaceutical Quality Through International Engagement

By: Howard Sklamberg, J.D.

As we’ve written and spoken so much about, the FDA has had to transform itself from a domestically-focused regulatory agency into a 21st century global health organization.  This transformation has come in the face of economic and technological changes that have revolutionized how we carry out our mission. We live in a world where other countries increasingly produce—at least in part—the food and medical products our consumers and patients use in their daily lives.

Howard SklambergProducts the FDA regulates now come from more than 150 countries—many with much less sophisticated regulatory systems than our own. In this international marketplace, 40 percent of our finished drugs are imported, and approximately 80 percent of the manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients used in the United States are located outside our borders.

Ensuring the quality of products in a global environment is a tall order. At every stage in the production of pharmaceutical products, and all along the global supply chain, things can go wrong.  Products can be improperly formulated, manufactured, or packaged. They can be contaminated or counterfeited. And the challenges are multiplied when the supply chain stretches around the world.

FDA is on the ground, around the world, inspecting facilities, developing relationships and providing advice.

But securing the global supply chain requires more than that. It calls for a cooperative and worldwide endeavor. It means working with our regulatory counterparts abroad to build capacity. It means harmonizing our standards for the sake of safer products and greater efficiency. It means engaging with industry and with regional and international organizations.

The Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), which Congress enacted in 2012, included some important provisions designed to improve the safety and integrity of imported drugs sold in the United States. Some of the provisions are focused on FDA’s inspectional activities overseas. For example, FDASIA increases FDA’s ability to partner with foreign regulatory authorities to leverage resources through increased information-sharing and recognition of foreign inspections.

We now have more than 60 agreements with foreign counterparts to share certain information in inspection reports and other non-public information that can help us make better decisions about the safety of foreign products.

This type of collaboration not only increases our ability to evaluate pharmaceutical facilities, but allows experts to learn from each other. The result: an outcome whose sum total exceeds its individual parts.

That is exactly why today we announced an initiative to expand on our existing work to ensure that the public has access to quality pharmaceuticals. Through this initiative, and in cooperation with the European Commission (EC) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA), FDA will aim to deepen our reliance on trusted regulators outside of the U.S. who provide equivalent public safety and quality protection.

This mutual reliance initiative builds on our existing relationships with the EC, the EMA, and member states of the European Union. Under this new initiative, the goal is to increase our exchange, with the EC and the EMA, of information that is critical to making decisions that protect the public health. And together we will be more efficient and effective in targeting our resources for inspecting pharmaceutical operations.

This is the latest step in our continuing efforts to improve the quality of pharmaceutical products – a step that will deploy a dedicated FDA team to work with our European counterparts on a host of issues. The team, which will focus full time on pharmaceutical quality, will include experts from our Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, our Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and our Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy.

As a public health regulatory agency with a global presence, we look forward to strengthening our mutual reliance and capitalizing on our shared interests. The initiative we embraced today signals yet another important step forward for pharmaceutical quality here in the U.S.—and around the world.

Howard Sklamberg, J.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

We Moved Forward on Many Fronts This Year

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

At the FDA, the agency that I’ve had the privilege to lead for the past five years, I am gratified to report that we have a lot to be proud of this year. In fact, this past year’s accomplishments on behalf of public health have been as substantial as any in FDA’s recent history.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.We moved significantly forward, for example, in creating a system that will reduce foodborne illness, approving novel medical products in cutting-edge areas of science, and continuing to develop our new tobacco control program. We worked successfully with Congress and with regulated industry to reach agreement on a number of difficult issues, while continuing to use the law to the full extent possible to protect consumers and advance public health.

While there were many significant actions and events to recognize, below are some of the highlights of 2013.

In the foods area, there were many new actions this year that will have a long-standing impact on improving our food supply for consumers. Throughout the year we have been proposing new rules to reach the goals set forth by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). These science-based standards will help ensure the safety of all foods produced for our market, whether they come from the U.S. or from other countries.

We also took important steps towards reducing artery-clogging trans fat in processed foods, and understanding the health impact of arsenic in rice. With a final rule that defines when baked goods, pastas and other foods can be considered free of gluten, people with celiac disease can have confidence in foods labeled “gluten free.” And we are studying whether adding caffeine to foods may have an effect on the health of young people and others.

There have likewise been many accomplishments in advancing the safety and effectiveness of medical products. We worked closely with Congress on the recently enacted Drug Quality and Security Act, which contains important provisions relating to the oversight of human drug compounding. The law also has provisions to help secure the drug supply chain so that we can better help protect consumers from the dangers of counterfeit, stolen, contaminated, or otherwise harmful drugs.

Using tools provided by last year’s landmark Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), we are continuing to improve the speed and efficiency of medical product reviews, including those involving low-cost, high quality generic drugs and innovative new medical devices. The average number of days it takes for pre-market review of a new medical device has been reduced by about one-third since 2010. The percentage of pre-market approval applications that we approve has increased since then, after steadily decreasing each year since 2004.

We launched a powerful new tool to accelerate the development and review of “breakthrough therapies,” allowing FDA to expedite development of a drug or biologic (such as a vaccine) if preliminary clinical evidence indicates that it may offer a substantial improvement over available therapies for patients with serious or life-threatening diseases. This offers real opportunities to get promising drugs more quickly to patients who need them. In fact, using this new approach, FDA recently approved two advanced treatments for rare types of cancer and one for hepatitis C. We have also strengthened efforts to ensure product quality, increased protection of the drug supply chain, and reduced drug shortages.

We confronted the growing misuse of powerful opioid pain relievers by advising manufacturers on how to make these drugs harder to abuse with formulations that are more difficult to crush for inhalation or dissolve for injection. And we recommended that hydrocodone combination products be subject to stricter controls to help prevent abuse. 

We took an important step towards fighting the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by implementing a voluntary plan to phase out the use of antibiotics to enhance the growth of food-producing animals, and to move any remaining therapeutic uses of these drugs under the oversight of a licensed veterinarian. So-called “production” use is considered a contributing factor in the development of bacteria that are resistant to the antibiotics used in human medical treatment.

In many areas of our work we are supporting the emerging field of personalized medicine. Advances in sequencing the human genome and greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease, combined with increasingly powerful computers and other technologies, are making it possible to tailor medical treatments to the specific characteristics, needs, and preferences of individual patients.

Many cancer drugs today are increasingly used with companion diagnostic tests that can help determine whether a patient will respond to the drug based on the genetic characteristics of the patient’s tumor. In May, FDA approved two drugs and companion diagnostic testing for the treatment of certain melanoma patients with particular genetic mutations.

Advances in science and technology are also seen in the creation of new medical devices. For example, 3-D printing - the making of a three-dimensional solid object from a digital model – was once considered the wave of the future. But in February, FDA cleared for marketing a device created by 3-D printing – a plate used in a surgical repair of the skull that is built specifically for the individual patient.

While we have worked hard to get therapies to patients, we are at the same time using the tools available to us to remove unsafe and dangerous products from the market. In November, we used new enforcement tools provided by the food-safety law to act quickly in the face of a potential danger to public health presented by certain OxyElite Pro products. These supplements had been linked to dozens of cases of acute liver failure and hepatitis. After FDA took action, the manufacturer agreed to recall and destroy the supplements.

Finally, we made significant progress in implementing the letter and spirit of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. We have signed contracts with numerous state and local authorities to enforce the ban on the sale of tobacco to children and teens; conducted close to 240,000 inspections; and written more than 12,100 warning letters to retailers. And, in the first quarter of 2014 we will launch a public education campaign aimed at reducing the number of young people who use tobacco products.

All of us take great pride in the skill and vigor with which we overcame the year’s challenges and new demands. And so, as the year draws to a close, I extend my gratitude to the employees at the FDA who work tirelessly on behalf of the American public year in and year out. To all of our stakeholders, my heartfelt wishes for a joyous holiday season and a safe and healthy 2014.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

The path toward a risk-based regulatory framework for health IT

By: Jodi Daniel, Bakul Patel and Matthew Quinn 

Yesterday, the Health IT Policy Committee (HITPC) accepted and approved recommendations from the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) working group for a risk-based regulatory framework for health information technology. The working group’s recommendations suggest a scope for an IT framework, risk and innovation criteria, and approaches for avoiding regulatory duplication. 

Only six short months ago, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) kicked off the FDASIA workgroup of the HITPC to provide stakeholder input into a report on a risk-based regulatory framework that promotes safety and innovation and reduces regulatory duplication, consistent with section 618 of FDASIA. This provision permitted the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to form a workgroup in order to obtain broad stakeholder input from across the health care, IT, patients and innovation spectrum. The FDA, ONC, and FCC actively participated in these discussions with stakeholders from across the health care, IT, patients and innovation spectrum. The working group met more than 28 times, and yesterday FDASIA workgroup chair, David Bates, presented the final recommendations to the HITPC. 

In recognition of this important milestone, and on behalf of the three agencies, we want to express our deep appreciation to the members of the workgroup (and a special thanks to David Bates) for committing themselves to this aggressive timeline and delivering a suite of thoughtful recommendations.

Next Steps

As the FDASIA workgroup’s efforts conclude, the agencies’ efforts now intensify. Over the next few months the FDA, ONC, and FCC will review the HIT Policy Committee’s recommendations and the public comments submitted through the docket we opened on regulations.gov. Using these thoughtful inputs, ONC, FDA, and FCC will work closely together to develop a report (by the January 2014 statutory deadline) that proposes an overarching health IT regulatory strategy and provides recommendations on ways to appropriately promote innovation, protect patient safety, and avoid regulatory duplication. 

We recognize the complex nature of health IT and its importance to our nation’s health.  Therefore, we intend to provide an opportunity for public comment and additional stakeholder input on the draft report following its publication in January 2014. We look forward to continued collaboration with all stakeholders as we advance our thinking on this important topic. 

Jodi Daniel is Director, Office of Policy and Planning, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT

Bakul Patel is Senior Policy Advisor, FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health

Matthew Quinn is Director of Healthcare Initiatives, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

FDA, Small Businesses, and the Common Goal of Advancing Public Health

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

When federal agencies celebrated “Small Business Week” last month, FDA had special reason to pay tribute. It is well known that the U.S. biomedical industry plays an essential role not only in advancing the health of individuals, but also the health of the overall economy. Less well appreciated is that small businesses account for much of this activity.  A new FDA report issued to Congress this week describes the multitude of ways we work with small businesses to support their innovative ability to craft new treatments, medicines, and devices that improve the health of all Americans. 

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The outreach efforts described in this report are vital, because small businesses not only have a unique role but also unique needs in their involvement with a regulatory body like the FDA. That’s why we’re working on a number of fronts to strengthen the ability of small businesses to engage and to help ensure that they are not disadvantaged by their size.

One way we do this is by reducing or even waiving user fees for small businesses that meet certain criteria. Sometimes a startup company might have a groundbreaking product, but lacks the financial resources to cover the full cost of user fees, which are paid to the FDA to help cover the cost of product reviews. Encouraging this kind of small business innovation is the reason FDA participates in the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, which funds research and development projects that have potential for commercialization and public benefit. Since 2008, FDA has awarded 36 SBIR grants with the average grant being just over $170,000. Small businesses are also eligible to apply for more broadly available FDA grants, such as Orphan Product Grants, which address rare diseases and disorders, and are tailored to meet the focus and needs of small firms.

Perhaps even more important to small businesses than funding is information. FDA works hard to maintain a variety of communications with small businesses. Seminars, webinars, and workshops open to, and often specifically designed for, small businesses are offered throughout the year free of charge. Links to these event listings can be found in Appendix D of the report. FDA’s product centers also have dedicated small business offices that give companies direct points of contact, which are identified in our new report. These offices provide technical support and education to small companies, hold meetings to hear the views and perspectives of small businesses, develop informational materials, and provide an accessible channel through which small businesses can acquire information from FDA. I hope small businesses will take advantage of these resources and reach out to FDA’s small business contacts.

Small businesses also benefit from early communication with FDA during the product review process. This early communication is especially valuable in FDA’s Rare Disease Program in which most product sponsors are small firms and the product evaluations can be particularly complex for companies with limited resources. Our centers have found that early communication between FDA and product sponsors gets safe and effective products to consumers faster. 

I encourage you to read the report for more information on how FDA promotes innovative research by small businesses, protects small businesses from unreasonable regulatory barriers, and thereby allows American ingenuity to thrive.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

Looking Back and Looking Ahead: FDASIA’s One Year Anniversary

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. 

One year ago today President Obama signed into law the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, bipartisan legislation reauthorizing user fee programs for innovator drugs and medical devices and establishing two new user fee programs for generic drugs and biosimilar biological products. 

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Coming at a time of continuing budget restraints, this steady and reliable source of funding is essential to support and maintain FDA’s staff of experts who review the thousands of product submissions we receive every year, and do so in a timely and thoughtful manner. Over the years, our user fee programs have ensured a predictable, consistent, and streamlined premarket program for industry and helped speed patient access to new safe and effective products. 

One of our major undertakings since last July has been putting in place the infrastructure for a new generic drug user fee program that will expedite the availability of low-cost, high quality generic drugs. The program has already achieved several significant milestones, including reducing the backlog of generic drug applications, enhancing review efficiencies, and streamlining hiring. Likewise, reauthorization of the medical device user fee program has helped to expedite the availability of innovative new products to market, and the program has already seen a decrease in the application backlog for device submissions. 

But user fees are by no means the only focus of the 140-page law. Additionally, FDASIA includes provisions to strengthen the drug supply chain, enhance engagement with FDA stakeholders, address the problem of drug shortages, and promote innovation. 

Since last July, FDA continues to meet its FDASIA milestones, and is on track to implement more provisions very soon. Consider some of our more significant accomplishments. In the area of innovation, we launched the new breakthrough therapy designation for drugs that may offer a substantial improvement over available therapies for patients with serious or life-threatening diseases and published guidance on the use of this and all of our expedited programs. In the area of engagement, we initiated the Patient-Focused Drug Development Program. The objective of this five-year effort is to more systematically obtain the patient’s perspective on a disease and its impact on patients’ daily lives, the types of treatment benefit that matter most to patients, and the adequacy of the available therapies for the disease. We have already held patient meetings on three major diseases and another is scheduled in September. 

Also, FDASIA is helping FDA take important steps to address the challenges posed by an increasingly global drug supply chain in which nearly 40 percent of finished drugs are imported and nearly 80 percent of active ingredients come from overseas sources. FDA has been able to halt food and devices from distribution if an inspector believes they are adulterated or misbranded, but the agency lacked this authority for drugs. FDASIA has extended the agency’s administrative detention authority to include drugs as well, and the agency is taking steps to implement this authority. In addition, earlier this year the agency pushed for higher penalties for counterfeiting and intentionally adulterating drugs before the federal sentencing commission – and succeeded. These are the first of several provisions that we must implement under Title VII, the section of FDASIA that strengthens FDA’s authorities over the drug supply chain. Later this week I hope many of you will join me at a public meeting to discuss how we might implement some of the other portions of this important section. 

To help the public keep track of our progress on these and other provisions, we’ve established a FDASIA web portal that includes a link to our three year implementation plan, which we intend to update on a monthly basis. 

Implementing FDASIA is a massive undertaking, requiring detailed planning to integrate these tasks with the rest of our workload. FDA is committed to implementing the requirements of FDASIA in a way that provides lasting improvements to public health, and we will meet these objectives as quickly as resources allow. 

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

“Breakthrough” Designation … Another Powerful Tool in FDA’s Toolbox for Expediting the Development and Review of Promising New Drugs for Serious Conditions

By: Janet Woodcock, M.D.

Janet Woodcock, M.D. is the Director of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

In fiscal year 2012, FDA approved 35 novel new drugs, also known as “new molecular entities.” Among these new products were drugs to treat patients with unmet medical needs, such as a groundbreaking treatment for a form of cystic fibrosis, the first FDA-approved human cord blood product for hematopoietic reconstitution, used to help patients with blood forming disorders, and the first drug to treat advanced basal cell carcinoma (a form of the most common skin cancer).

To enable our ongoing efforts to bring innovative drug products to the public as efficiently as possible, FDA relies heavily on several expedited development and review tools such as fast track designation, the accelerated approval pathway and priority review designation. For instance, 56 percent of the novel drugs approved by the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research in calendar year 2012 used some combination of these tools to speed promising therapies to patients with serious conditions. And any given drug may have received multiple expedited program designations. (See a brief summary of how each of these tools helps FDA shorten the development and review of promising new therapies.)

In July 2012, a provision in the new law called the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, or FDASIA for short, gave FDA another powerful expedited development tool, known as the “breakthrough therapy” designation. This new designation is now helping FDA assist drug developers expedite the development of new drugs with preliminary clinical evidence that indicates the drug may offer a substantial improvement over available therapies for patients with serious or life-threatening diseases. Although the designation is not yet even a year old, FDA has received 62 requests to grant this new designation to products under development. We have been very active on this subject, meeting with companies and discussing ways to expedite the drug development process for drugs that show striking early results. We have already granted the breakthrough designation to 20 potential innovative new drugs that have shown encouraging early clinical results.

Drug developers should have a clear understanding of all of FDA’s expedited development and review tools. To help industry better understand each tool, including when the tools can be used and the features of each, we have just published an industry draft guidance titled Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions — Drugs and BiologicsAmong other important information, the draft guidance describes FDA’s policies and the threshold criteria for each expedited program, defines and discusses important concepts, including serious condition, unmet medical need, and available therapy, and provides some general considerations for products utilizing an expedited program, such as manufacturing and product quality, nonclinical considerations, and clinical inspection considerations.

The breakthrough therapy designation gives us another tool in our “toolbox” to help expedite the development and review of new drugs to treat patients with serious medical conditions and little or no treatment options. We’ll continue to use the new breakthrough therapy designation and our existing tools to help make our expedited programs even more effective.

We’ve said it before — and I believe it’s worth repeating — our decision-making on whether to approve a drug always involves an evaluation of many factors, such as the seriousness of the disease.  However, ultimately any drug approved must show that its benefits outweigh its risks and regardless of which expedited development or review program or programs are used, FDA does not compromise its safety or efficacy standards in exchange for rapid approval. Like all drugs we approve, those approved after having been designated as breakthrough therapies will meet our usual rigorous standards for safety and effectiveness.

Janet Woodcock, M.D. is the Director of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

The Road Ahead for Ensuring Access to Quality Drugs for All Americans … New Laws Under “FDASIA” Will Help Pave the Way

By: Howard Sklamberg

In January, I became director of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s (CDER) Office of Compliance, giving me the responsibility – and great privilege — of playing a lead role in FDA’s work to help protect the American public from unsafe and ineffective drugs. It’s a big job, filled with many challenges.

Fortunately, after three years of service with FDA, most recently as the agency’s deputy associate commissioner for regulatory affairs (our field operation), and 12 years before that as a prosecutor with the Justice Department, I feel prepared to help the agency meet these challenges head on.

I’d like to take an opportunity to share my priorities, as well as my views and perspectives on the goals and challenges ahead for FDA, as we continue to work to ensure access to quality drugs in the United States.

Tragically, last October’s outbreak of fungal meningitis from contaminated methylprednisolone injections that killed over 50 Americans and sickened hundreds more directed FDA’s attention to the immediate public health priority of evaluating the quality of sterile compounded drugs and preventing further incidents. Our efforts have included proposing a new legislative framework for federal oversight, inspecting high-risk compounding facilities that produce sterile drugs, and working more closely with our state partners.

As important as our efforts are in the compounding arena, our compliance challenges extend to many other critical areas, many of which are related to the new and growing global marketplace for pharmaceutical products.

Today, nearly 40 percent of the drugs Americans take are imported and nearly 80 percent of the active ingredients come from overseas sources. A growing number of clinical trials that test the safety and effectiveness of potential new drugs are also moving overseas, making FDA oversight more challenging. Counterfeit drugs are proliferating around the world and sometimes even entering the U.S.supply chain. The ever burgeoning worldwide use of the Internet continues to spawn avenues for illegal online sales of medicines of unknown safety and quality. Also, poor manufacturing practices that lead to facility shut-downs often contribute to shortages of important drugs. We must ensure that wherever drugs are made, wherever their ingredients are from, or wherever and however they are tested and sold, that they meet FDA’s strict standards of quality and that they remain in adequate supply.

Despite these challenges, there’s good news. The Food and Drug Administration Innovation and Safety Act of 2012 (FDASIA) gave FDA powerful new tools to enhance our compliance and enforcement activities including stronger authorities and funding to support the inspection of foreign manufacturing facilities. For example, FDASIA facilitates our ability to partner with and work more effectively with foreign regulatory agencies. FDASIA also gave FDA more authorities to control the drug supply chain.

However, laws on the books do not automatically translate into effective change without effective implementation and enforcement of these laws. So, in addition to continuing our critical work with Congress on appropriate and effective oversight of compounding that exceeds the bounds of traditional pharmacy compounding, my other key priority is to work to implement FDASIA’s provisions, keeping CDER focused globally and armed with the best set of tools possible to do the job. Although we have much more work to do, a vision of enhanced capabilities of ensuring quality drug products for the American public is well in sight.

I have the distinct privilege and responsibility of being part of a fantastic team of dedicated FDA staff that’s really making a difference, and I look forward to continuing to serve the American public in working to ensure access to quality drugs.

Howard Sklamberg is Director of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Office of Compliance