Measles Vaccine Is Safe and Effective – And Should Be Used

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

In recent weeks we’ve seen an alarming outbreak of measles; a highly contagious and serious virus, especially in babies and young children who have not been vaccinated. This outbreak is particularly disturbing because measles was effectively eliminated from the United States in 2000 thanks to nearly universal vaccination, the single best way to prevent the spread of this disease.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Vaccination works with the body’s natural defenses to help it safely develop immunity to the measles. When more people are vaccinated, there are fewer opportunities for the disease to spread. A community generally needs more than ninety per cent of its members to be immunized against the virus in order to protect those who can’t be.

Today, there are two safe and effective FDA-approved vaccines. More than 95% of the people who receive a single dose will develop immunity. And a second dose conveys immunity to nearly everyone who did not respond to the first dose. Simply put, these vaccines are safe and effective, and serious side effects are rare.

Before the first measles vaccine was approved in 1963, hundreds died from the disease each year. Others developed pneumonia, lifelong brain damage or deafness.

Let’s not return to these grim statistics. There is no shortage of measles vaccine. It should be used by everyone who has not been vaccinated to prevent measles and the potentially tragic consequences of the disease.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of Food and Drugs

Technology Transfer—Transforming Food Safety with the GenomeTrakr Collaboration

By: Alice Welch

In my last blog post I discussed how FDA’s Technology Transfer program helps drive innovation by building collaborations that can solve today’s public health challenges using leading-edge science. This blog post describes one of those FDA collaborations—a pathogen detection network that is transforming food safety.

Alice WelchAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), foodborne disease outbreaks are responsible for about 48 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths every year in the United States. The annual toll for Salmonella poisoning alone in this country is 1 million illnesses, 19,000 hospitalizations, and nearly 400 deaths. As the world becomes even more interconnected, FDA has recognized the urgency of creating new approaches and better tools to detect food contamination and stop outbreaks in their tracks.

The FDA-established GenomeTrakr is an innovative response to this global public health challenge. Using a cutting-edge technology called Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS), FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) and Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) are collaborating with federal and state public health laboratories to build a publicly accessible genomic database called GenomeTrakr. GenomeTrakr enables us to compare some of the bacterial pathogens that cause foodborne diseases and trace them back to their sources faster and more precisely than traditional methods.

WGS is a laboratory process that identifies the complete DNA sequence of an organism’s genetic material at a single time. The process is being used together with GenomeTrakr to identify pathogens isolated from food or environmental samples and compare them to pathogens isolated from sick patients. If the isolates from food or environmental samples match the pathogens taken from the sick patients, scientists can establish a reliable link that helps characterize the size and location of the foodborne disease outbreak. It can even help public health officials determine which ingredient in a multi-ingredient food is causing the outbreak—so that we can get contaminated food out of the food supply. Used by epidemiologists in combination with traditional methods, WGS is advancing our understanding of contaminations in the food supply.

Pathogens evolve very quickly and have thousands of genetic variations. After spending time in a particular geographic location, a pathogen like Salmonella begins to acquire unique genetic signatures that identify it as coming from that location. Until recently, some strains of Salmonella have looked much the same to us, no matter where we found them, because some of the older methods of testing have been unable to distinguish between certain strains of pathogens. But WGS can detect unique signatures within and between species with far greater precision than previous methods, which makes it one of our biggest secret weapons in tackling foodborne illness outbreaks.

FDA scientists and our collaborators in federal and state public health laboratories are using WGS and the GenomeTrakr database to identify those unique signatures. The signatures can often tell us, for example, if a Salmonella that has contaminated a certain part of the food supply is from the U.S. West Coast, New England, or even Germany. FDA and state lab scientists upload the entire genome sequence for a pathogen into the GenomeTrakr database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information, where it’s available for further use. As the database continues to grow, it’s becoming an increasingly powerful tool to help investigations home in faster on the root causes of outbreaks and track their location.

The potential of technologies like WGS to enhance food safety could not be realized without the development of a powerful database like GenomeTrakr. But to build that kind of database FDA needed to form a web of collaborations. Enter FDA’s Technology Transfer team. It plays a critical role in working with our researchers to create the successful relationships that make huge databases like GenomeTrakr work.

To achieve CFSAN’s vision, FDA’s Technology Transfer team worked with CFSAN researchers to create agreements tailored to the project’s needs. The team drafted collaboration agreements that included provisions for establishing relationships between FDA and state laboratories to perform WGS and upload genome sequences into GenomeTrakr. Once CFSAN’s project concept and goals were established, Technology Transfer experts negotiated and put agreements in place so FDA could begin linking federal and state partners to advance the use of WGS across public health.

Since the first state public health lab collaboration was established in February 2012, FDA, along with other international, federal, and state laboratories have added genome sequences for more than 11,000 isolates to the GenomeTrakr database, and we are already seeing impressive results! In early 2014, through a partnership with CDC, FDA and state department of health laboratories used GenomeTrakr to match environmental and food samples with human biological samples, which helped FDA confirm the source of Listeria in an outbreak.

This collaboration is just one of many that our Technology Transfer team has helped create to support FDA efforts to speed innovation in public health. Stay tuned for my next post, where I’ll discuss an FDA invention that is preventing hundreds of thousands of Africans from contracting the debilitating disease of Meningitis.

Learn more:  Whole Genome Sequencing: The Future of Food Safety

HHS Innovates Award Paves Way for the Future of Food Safety and PulseNet

Alice Welch, Ph.D., is Director of FDA’s Technology Transfer Program

FDA’s FY 2016 Budget Request

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.FDA oversees products that represent more than 20 cents of every dollar that American consumers spend. Today, FDA presented its FY 2016 budget to Congress.This sensible budget request will help ensure that FDA can continue to fulfill its vast responsibilities to protect the public health, safety, and quality of life of the American public.

I want to share the cover letter that I wrote to Congress outlining some of our specific proposals.

 

Letter from the Commissioner

I am pleased to present the FY 2016 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Budget.

FDA fulfills its important mission to promote and protect health in an increasingly complex and globalized world in many ways.  The scope of our work includes assuring that foods are safe, wholesome, sanitary and properly labeled; ensuring that human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products, and medical devices intended for human use are safe and effective; and regulating tobacco products.  We also play a lead role in protecting the public from electronic product radiation and assuring that cosmetics and dietary supplements are safe and properly labeled.  Finally, we have devoted – and will continue to devote – substantial resources to advancing the public health by helping to speed product innovations.

FDA’s responsibilities continue to expand as we work to fulfill the mandates of groundbreaking legislation passed in recent years, including the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) of 2011, the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012, and the Drug Quality and Security Act of 2013.  Further, with so many FDA-regulated products manufactured in whole or in part outside of our borders, FDA is keenly focused on the complexities of regulating in a global marketplace.

In FY 2014, we took important steps to finalize a key set of proposed food safety rules; worked to improve the safety of compounded pharmaceutical products by conducting more than 90 inspections and implementing compounding legislation through proposed regulations, guidances, and other actions; published the “deeming rule” to extend FDA’s tobacco authority; and collaborated with federal, international, and industry partners to expedite the development and availability of medical products.  In addition, FDA has worked intensively to respond to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa by facilitating the development and availability of investigational diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines with the potential to help combat the epidemic.

FDA continues to seek new ways to obtain the most public health value for the federal dollar as we implement expanded authorities.  The products that FDA regulates are essential to public health, safety, and quality of life and represent over 20 cents of every consumer dollar spent on products in the United States.  Yet, in terms of our FDA budget, each American taxpayer contributes approximately $8 per year for the vast array of protections and services provided by FDA.

In FY 2016, we are requesting essential and timely resources to address critical food and medical product safety issues.  Mindful of the fiscal environment, we have identified targeted reductions where possible and identified long-term needs for additional user fees to balance budget authority growth.  FDA is requesting a total of $4.9 billion to support our various mandates to protect the American people.  This includes a $148 million budget authority increase to focus on the following:

  • delivering a farm-to-table system of prevention, including improved oversight of imported foods, through effectively implementing the final rules required by FSMA;
  • combating the growing threat of antibiotic resistance – in which drugs become less effective, or ineffective, against harmful bacteria;
  • promoting the development and appropriate use of reliable molecular and genetic diagnostics – precision medicine tools – to “personalize” the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease;
  • implementing key FDASIA requirements to improve medical product review and inspections;
  • addressing the safety of compounded drugs;
  • continuing implementation of new requirements for review of sunscreen ingredients under the Sunscreen Innovation Act; and
  • supporting modern facilities to provide the laboratories and office space needed to meet FDA’s expanded legislative mandates.

As a science-based regulatory agency with a public health mission, FDA plays a unique and essential role in promoting and protecting public health and safety.  We are committed to meeting the needs and expectations of the American people.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Commissioner of Food and Drugs

For an AIDS-Free Generation: Access to Drugs and Diagnostics Is Essential

By: FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. and HHS Assistant Secretary Jimmy Kolker

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.On World AIDS Day this year, tens of millions of people with HIV are now living healthy, productive lives because of access to safe and lower priced medicines. We rejoice in this achievement, because all people, no matter how rich or poor, deserve to have the medicines they need to live their lives in the best health possible.

We can truly see in our future an AIDS-Free generation because of the wide availability of prevention and treatment tools. But the availability of these drugs and diagnostic tools, especially in Africa, was never a given. Ten years ago, in 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) committed to support the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) by introducing an expedited review process to make generic and low-cost treatment more readily available for the most affected countries. PEPFAR requires antiretroviral drugs to be safe, effective, and of high quality and supports their distribution to people needing treatment around the globe. But meeting these requirements can be costly and time-consuming. Those suffering from AIDS cannot wait. The FDA, an agency that is part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), applied the tentative approval process in order to increase dramatically the number of products approved for purchase and distribution by PEPFAR.

Thanks to the commitment of FDA scientists, as of today FDA has issued expedited approval decisions for 179 products, including 39 formulations specifically designed for children that allow flexible dosing across multiple weight bands and many innovative formulations, such as fixed-dose combinations and co-packaged products that improve adherence to treatment and reduce the risk of developing resistance. The 179 tentative approvals allowed PEPFAR to purchase products at a lower cost, leading to cost savings of hundreds of millions of dollars. These savings contributed to additional patients being able to receive treatment.

Jimmy KolkerAccording to UNAIDS, by June 2014, 13.6 million people around the world had access to antiretroviral therapy. This is an important success, but many more people still need access.

Unfortunately, too many countries lack the regulatory capacity to conduct product registrations in a timely manner. This makes it difficult for these countries to provide high-quality rapid HIV tests and treatment.

The FDA and the HHS have been working with the Department of State Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (S/GAC); the World Health Organization; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria; and other organizations to help countries build both their health care systems and regulatory capacities.

Importantly, FDA has partnered with host country health ministries to help strengthen regulatory capacities in support of their public health programs. PEPFAR recently contributed $1.5 million in support of this FDA partnership to further regulatory system strengthening in the East African community.

With these improvements, countries battling HIV and AIDS can build the systems necessary to ensure that patients get the high-quality treatment they need, which one day will lead to the realization of an AIDS-free generation.

Margaret A.  Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

Jimmy Kolker is Assistant Secretary for Global Affairs in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

FDA as part of a coordinated global response on Ebola

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

The tragic Ebola epidemic is an extraordinary global public health crisis, and FDA is taking extraordinary steps to be proactive and flexible in our response – whether it’s providing advice on medical product development, authorizing the emergency use of new diagnostic tools, quickly enabling access to investigational therapies, or working on the front lines in West Africa.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.FDA has an Ebola Task Force with wide representation from across FDA to coordinate our many activities. We are actively working with federal colleagues, the medical and scientific community, industry, and international organizations and regulators to help expedite the development and availability of medical products – such as treatments, vaccines, diagnostic tests, and personal protective equipment – with the potential to help bring the epidemic under control as quickly as possible.

These efforts include providing scientific and regulatory advice to commercial developers and U.S. government agencies that support medical product development, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). The advice that FDA is providing is helping to accelerate product development programs.

Our medical product reviewers have been working tirelessly with sponsors to clarify regulatory requirements, provide input on manufacturing and pre-clinical and clinical trial designs, and expedite the regulatory review of data as it is received. FDA has been in contact with dozens of drug, vaccine, device, and diagnostic test developers, and we remain in contact with more than 20 sponsors that have possible products in pipeline.

We also have been collaborating with the World Health Organization and other international regulatory counterparts—including the European Medicines Agency, Health Canada, and others—to exchange information about investigational products for Ebola in support of international response efforts.

Investigational vaccines and treatments for Ebola are in the earliest stages of development and for most, there are only small amounts of some experimental products that have been manufactured for testing. For those in limited supply, there are efforts underway to increase their production so their safety and efficacy can be properly assessed in clinical trials.

As FDA continues to work to expedite medical product development, we strongly support the establishment of clinical trials, which is the most efficient way to show whether these new products actually work. In the meantime, we also will continue to enable access to investigational products when they are available and requested by clinicians, using expanded access mechanisms, also known as “compassionate use,” which allow access to such products outside of clinical trials when we assess that the expected benefits outweigh the potential risks for the patient.

In addition, under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority, we can allow the use of an unapproved medical product—or an unapproved use of an approved medical product—for a larger population during emergencies, when, among other reasons, based on scientific evidence available, there is no adequate, approved, and available alternative. To date, FDA has authorized the use of five diagnostic tests during this Ebola epidemic: one was developed by DoD, two were developed by CDC, and this week FDA issued EUAs for two new, quicker Ebola tests made by BioFire Defense.

To further augment diagnostic capacity, we have contacted several commercial developers that we know are capable of developing rapid diagnostic tests and have encouraged them to work with us to quickly develop and make available such tests. Several entities have expressed interest and have initiated discussions with FDA.

We also are monitoring for fraudulent products and false product claims related to the Ebola virus and taking appropriate action to protect consumers. To date, we have issued warning letters to three companies marketing products that claim to prevent, treat or cure infection by the Ebola virus, among other conditions. Additionally, we are carefully monitoring the personal protective equipment (PPE) supply chain to help ensure this essential equipment continues to be available to protect health care workers.

And at least 12 FDA employees are being deployed to West Africa as part of the Public Health Service’s team to help with medical care. We are proud that they are answering the call.

As you can see, FDA has been fully engaged in response activities and is using its authorities to the fullest extent possible to continue its mission to protect and promote the public health, both domestically and abroad. Our staff is fully committed to responding in the most proactive, thoughtful, and flexible manner to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

I could not be more proud of the dedication and leadership that the FDA staff involved in this response has shown. I therefore want to take this opportunity to thank more than 250 staff, including those soon to be on the ground in West Africa, who have already contributed countless hours to this important effort, and who will continue to do so in the coming days and weeks as we address this very serious situation. I am hopeful that our work and the coordinated global response will soon lead to the end of this epidemic and help reduce the risk of additional cases in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

FDA’s Program Alignment Addresses New Regulatory Challenges

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Over the last year, a group of senior FDA leaders, under my direction, were tasked to develop plans to modify FDA’s functions and processes in order to address new regulatory challenges. Among these challenges are: the increasing breadth and complexity of FDA’s mandate; the impact of globalization on the food and medical product supply chains; and the ongoing trend of rapid scientific innovation and increased biomedical discovery.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The Directorates, Centers and the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) have collaborated closely to define the changes needed to align ourselves more strategically and operationally and meet the greater demands placed on the agency. As a result, each regulatory program has established detailed action plans. Specifically, each plan describes the steps in transitioning to commodity-based and vertically-integrated regulatory programs in the following areas: human and veterinary drugs; biological products; medical devices and radiological health; bioresearch monitoring (BIMO); food and feed; and tobacco.

These action plans focus on what will be accomplished in FY 2015 and outline the need to develop detailed future plans for the next five years in some cases. The plans represent what each Center and ORA have agreed are the critical actions to jointly fulfill FDA’s mission in the key areas of specialization, training, work planning, compliance policy and enforcement strategy, imports, laboratory optimization, and information technology.

Because each Center has a unique regulatory program to manage, there are understandably variations among the plans. However, there are also common features across most of the plans: the need to define specialization across our inspection and compliance functions; to identify competencies in these areas of specialization and develop appropriate training curricula; to develop risk-based work planning that is aligned with program priorities and improves accountability; and to develop clear and current compliance policies and enforcement strategies.

Below are some highlights from the plans that illustrate these features:

  • Establish Senior Executive Program Directors in ORA. In the past, for example, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) would work with several ORA units responsible for the pharmaceutical program. Now, the Centers will have a single Senior Executive in ORA responsible for each commodity program, allowing ORA and the Centers to resolve matters more efficiently.
  • Jointly develop new inspection approaches. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and ORA plan, for example, will begin to focus some inspections on characteristics and features of medical devices most critical to patient safety and device effectiveness. ORA investigators will perform these inspections utilizing jointly developed training.
  • Invest in expanded training across ORA and the Centers. The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and ORA will jointly develop a biologics training curriculum, redesign investigator certification, and cross-train Center and ORA investigators, compliance officers and managers.
  • Expand compliance tools. Field investigators will be teamed with subject matter experts from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the Center for Veterinary Medicine to make decisions in real time, working with firms to achieve prompt correction of food safety deficiencies and to help implement the preventive approaches outlined by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). If industry does not quickly and adequately correct critical areas of noncompliance that could ultimately result in food borne outbreaks, we will use our enforcement tools, including those provided under FSMA, as appropriate.
  • Optimize FDA laboratories. ORA and the various Centers will establish a multi-year strategic plan for ORA scientific laboratory work, including hiring and training analysts, purchasing and using equipment, and allocating resources and facilities. At the same time, ORA is committed to conducting an ongoing review of its labs to ensure that they are properly managed and operating as efficiently as possible.
  • Create specialized investigators, compliance officers, and first-line managers. A bioresearch monitoring (BIMO) working group is developing a plan for a dedicated corps of ORA investigators to conduct BIMO inspections, and a dedicated cadre of tobacco investigators is being established.

Working together to implement these action plans will take time, commitment, and continued investment and we’ll need to monitor and evaluate our efforts. These plans will help us implement the new FSMA rules announced in September, as well as the Agency’s new medical product quality initiatives under the FDA Safety and Innovation Act and Drug Quality and Security Act.

FDA’s Program Alignment is a well-thought out approach that responds to the needs of a changing world. I look forward to the ways in which these action plans will ultimately enhance the FDA’s public health and regulatory mission.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Re-scheduling prescription hydrocodone combination drug products: An important step toward controlling misuse and abuse

By: Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D.

Hydrocodone is the most prescribed opioid in the United States, including 137 million prescriptions in 2013. While it is useful in the treatment of pain, it has also contributed significantly to the very serious problem of opioid misuse and abuse in the United States. With the aim of curbing this misuse and abuse, new prescribing requirements go into effect today for hydrocodone combination products, which include products such as Anexsia, Lorcet, Vicodin, and some cough suppressants that contain both hydrocodone and another active ingredient, such as acetaminophen.

Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D.Under a final rule issued by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), hydrocodone combination products are now in a more restrictive category of controlled substances, along with other opioid drugs for pain like morphine and oxycodone.  After a scientific review, FDA made the recommendation that DEA take this step in December 2013. We concluded that hydrocodone combination products meet the criteria for control under Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act, and we believe DEA’s new rule will help limit the risks of these potentially addictive but important pain-relieving products.

Here are some of the key changes that will occur with the reclassification of hydrocodone from a Schedule III drug to a Schedule II drug:

  • If a patient needs additional medication, the prescriber must issue a new prescription. Phone–in refills for these products are no longer allowed.
  • In emergencies, small supplies can be authorized until a new prescription can be provided for the patient.
  • Patients will still have access to reasonable quantities of medication, generally up to a 30-day supply.

After DEA requested a scientific and medical recommendation from FDA regarding a change of schedule for hydrocodone combination products in 2009, FDA considered the eight statutorily required factors related to the abuse potential of hydrocodone. These included such questions as the products’ actual or relative potential for abuse, their liability to cause psychic or physiological dependence, and dangers they might pose to public health. After a thorough analysis of the available information, including a public Advisory Committee meeting to solicit input from outside experts and patients (the committee recommended upscheduling by a vote of 19 to 10), HHS recommended to DEA that hydrocodone combination products be reclassified into Schedule II.

We also recommended two other actions we believe are critical to maximizing the benefits to the public health of rescheduling hydrocodone:

  • Include rescheduling in a broad-based set of actions targeting abuse prevention. In particular, HHS identified a need to work with prescribers and patients to make certain that patients are prescribed the right number of doses of hydrocodone for a patient’s need to avoid unused hydrocodone being available for abuse.
  • Continue to monitor the use and abuse of hydrocodone combination products carefully to assess the impact of rescheduling on public health. Based on the results of this monitoring, we may need to take additional actions to support the appropriate use of hydrocodone combination products while reducing their tragic abuse.

FDA understands that it is crucial to achieve a goal of balancing the risk of abuse and misuse with the need to maintain access to these important medications that provide needed relief to people in pain. Rescheduling hydrocodone combination products is one important action in support of this goal.

Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D., is Deputy Center Director for Regulatory Programs in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

New Data Dashboard Tool Shares FDA’s Inspection, Compliance and Recall Data

By: Douglas Stearn

Douglas StearnAs part of our commitment to transparency FDA is pleased to announce that we have released a new online tool to provide insight into our compliance, inspection, and recall activities.

This new dynamic tool represents a departure from the downloadable spreadsheet-based datasets that we have posted in the past. Instead, the FDA data dashboard presents information in an easy-to-read graphical format. It also provides access to the underlying data allowing anyone interested to see related data and trends.

Our new dashboard provides data for FY 2009 to FY 2013, and allows access to data on:

  • inspections;
  • warning letters;
  • seizures and injunctions;
  • and statistics, specifically for recalls.

We plan to update the data semi-annually.

The dashboard is staged in a cloud environment, and it allows you to:

  • download information for additional analysis;
  • manipulate what you see by selecting filters;
  • rearrange the format of datasets and the way columns are sorted;
  • drill down into data; and
  • export charts and source information for further review.

We developed this new dashboard after President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum on Regulatory Compliance in January 2011.

The President directed federal agencies to make publicly available compliance information easily accessible, downloadable and searchable online, to the extent feasible and permitted by law. FDA formed internal working groups that same year to develop recommendations for enhancing the transparency of our operations and decision-making processes. These working groups identified an online tool as a way to present compliance and enforcement data in a user-friendly manner. The dashboard represents the latest example of our commitment to compiling and posting a wealth of FDA data  for public review and feedback.

FDA works within a global environment and is carrying out more inspections around the world. We collaborate with regulatory authorities across the globe to protect public health. Our data dashboard provides information about inspections in this global environment, and makes this information more readily accessible to the public. Now you can use the dashboard to see this kind of inspection-related information to better understand our regulatory decisions.

A “feedback mechanism” is available so you can send comments, questions or concerns directly to us at FDADataDashboard@fda.hhs.gov.

This rollout effort is part of FDA’s continuing commitment to share inspection, compliance, and recall data. We will continue to update the FDA data dashboard and provide public access to this timely and important information.

Douglas Stearn is Director of the Office of Enforcement and Import Operations within FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs

FDA Works to Mitigate the West Africa Ebola Outbreak

By: Luciana Borio, M.D.

Luciana Borio, M.D.The world is witnessing the devastating effects of the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, the worst Ebola outbreak in recorded history. To date, more than two thousand people in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have become infected, and more than twelve hundred have died. The stories of so many lives lost, and those of so many others fighting for their lives, are heartbreaking and tragic. We at the Food and Drug Administration are dedicated to helping end this outbreak as quickly as possible. And we are working hard to accelerate the development and production of treatments and vaccines to help prevent future outbreaks like this.

The primary approaches to contain the current outbreak remain standard public health measures. However, this outbreak presents complex challenges, in part because there are no FDA-approved treatments or vaccines for the Ebola virus. FDA has an important role during situations like this.

For example, we are working closely with U.S. government agencies that support medical product development – including the National Institutes of Health, the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) – to speed the development and production of medical products that could help mitigate outbreaks like this. And we are working interactively with medical product sponsors to clarify regulatory and data requirements in order to move investigational products forward in development as quickly as possible. We also are in close contact with the World Health Organization and several of our international regulatory counterparts to exchange information about these investigational products for Ebola treatment, and to exchange information about how FDA works to facilitate development of and access to these products.

The experimental vaccines and treatments in development are in the earliest investigational stages and have not been fully tested for safety or efficacy. Only small amounts of some experimental products have been manufactured for testing, which means few courses, if any, are available for companies to make available for compassionate use in response to this outbreak. We are working closely with our U.S. government colleagues to have experimental treatments and vaccines available for clinical evaluation in the next few months. We are hopeful that, in the future, we will have medical products approved and manufactured for wide-scale use to address the Ebola outbreak. However, these products are not at that stage yet.

In the meantime, FDA is doing all we can to alleviate the situation. FDA has one of the world’s most flexible regulatory frameworks, which includes mechanisms to enable access to available investigational medical products when, based on certain criteria such as the balance between expected risk and benefit to the patient, it would be appropriate to use such products.

For example, under certain circumstances, clinicians may request the use of an Emergency Investigational New Drug (EIND) application under the FDA’s Expanded Access program to access investigational products outside of clinical trials for their patients. And under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority, we can allow the use of an unapproved medical product – or an unapproved use of an approved medical product – for a larger population during emergencies, when there are no adequate, approved and available alternatives.

This month, we authorized the use of an Ebola diagnostic test, developed by DoD, under an EUA to detect the Ebola virus in DoD-designated laboratories. This test can help facilitate an effective response to the ongoing outbreak in West Africa by helping to rapidly identify patients infected with Ebola virus and facilitate appropriate containment measures and clinical care.

It is an unfortunate fact that, during outbreaks like this, fraudulent products that claim to prevent, treat or cure a disease rapidly appear on the market. FDA has learned of several fraudulent products that claim to prevent or treat this Ebola virus infection, including so-called natural remedies. Consumers who have seen these fraudulent products or false claims should report them to us. For our part, we will remain vigilant for fraudulent products and false product claims related to the Ebola virus, and will take enforcement actions as warranted to protect public health.

FDA stands ready to work with companies and healthcare providers to speed product development and to facilitate access to investigational products to treat patients when appropriate. We are fully committed to helping end this outbreak as quickly as possible and to sustaining our efforts to help prevent such outbreaks in the future.

Luciana Borio, M.D., is the Assistant Commissioner for Counterterrorism Policy and Acting Deputy Chief Scientist.

Clinical Trials: Enhancing Data Quality, Encouraging Participation and Improving Transparency

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Today FDA is announcing important steps that the agency plans to take to enhance the collection and availability of clinical trial data on demographic subgroups – patient populations divided by sex, race/ethnicity or age.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Section 907 of the 2012 FDA Safety and Innovation Act directed us to take a closer look at the extent to which clinical trial participation and the inclusion of safety and effectiveness data by demographic subgroups is included in medical product applications, report our findings, and then, within one year, produce an action plan with recommendations for improvements.

Our report, issued on August 20, 2013, found that the agency’s statutes, regulations, and policies generally give product sponsors a solid framework for providing data in their applications on the inclusion and analysis of demographic subgroups. Overall, sponsors are describing the demographic profiles of their clinical trial participants, and the majority of applications submitted to FDA include demographic subset analyses. We also found that FDA shares this information with the public in a variety of ways. Now, one year later, we’re releasing the FDA Action Plan to Enhance the Collection and Availability of Demographic Subgroup Data, which we developed after extensive interaction with stakeholders.

The action plan includes 27 action items that are designed to meet three overarching priorities – improving the completeness and quality of demographic subgroup data collection, reporting and analysis (quality); identifying barriers to subgroup enrollment in clinical trials and employing strategies to encourage greater participation (participation); and, making demographic subgroup data more available and transparent (transparency).

In addition to the action plan, we’re publishing a final guidance entitled, “Evaluation of Sex-Specific Data in Medical Device Clinical Studies.” It was written in response to the fact that certain medical devices may yield different responses in women than men, and yet women are under-represented in some medical device studies. This has led to less information for women regarding the risks and benefits of using these devices.

The guidance includes recommended methods for clinical study design and conduct to increase enrollment of men and women, if needed, and ways to analyze data for sex differences. FDA has held a series of public workshops to raise awareness about common strategies for enhancing recruitment and retention of women in medical device clinical trials. Fully integrating this final guidance into the templates used by FDA’s reviewers of medical devices, and providing a webinar for industry on how to use the guidance, comprise one of the 27 items in our action plan.

I hope you’ll find that the action plan is responsive and pragmatic and, most importantly, when fully implemented, it will improve medical care and public health. Many of the steps it outlines will have a broad impact on the work of FDA’s medical product centers and will require great thought and planning as they are implemented, depending on current evidence and available resources. The action items range from relatively short-term goals that can be achieved in a year, to others that will take 1-3 years, to a small number that will require a longer period, 3-5 years, to achieve.

Although the plan certainly places significant responsibilities on FDA’s medical product centers and other FDA offices, it also engages our partners inside and outside of government to share the responsibility for this important mission. For example, industry is being asked to help develop and share best practices for encouraging broad clinical trial participation, and the National Institutes of Health will be participating in several research projects with FDA.

We know that richer information is collected when different subgroups are enrolled in pivotal studies for medical products. This kind of enrollment in turn gives us greater assurance in the safety and effectiveness of the medical products used by a diverse population.

To set the plan in motion quickly, FDA is setting up a steering committee that will oversee implementation, come up with metrics for measuring progress and be responsible for planning a public meeting to be held within 18 months after release of the plan. FDA has already set up a website where the public will be able to track the agency’s implementation progress. That website will be updated on a regular basis.

Also, we’re reopening our Section 907 public docket to solicit comments for the action plan. I encourage everyone to review the document and consider how you might be able to partner with FDA and others in encouraging necessary and appropriate demographic subgroup diversity and representation.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration