FDA’s Program Alignment Addresses New Regulatory Challenges

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Over the last year, a group of senior FDA leaders, under my direction, were tasked to develop plans to modify FDA’s functions and processes in order to address new regulatory challenges. Among these challenges are: the increasing breadth and complexity of FDA’s mandate; the impact of globalization on the food and medical product supply chains; and the ongoing trend of rapid scientific innovation and increased biomedical discovery.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The Directorates, Centers and the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) have collaborated closely to define the changes needed to align ourselves more strategically and operationally and meet the greater demands placed on the agency. As a result, each regulatory program has established detailed action plans. Specifically, each plan describes the steps in transitioning to commodity-based and vertically-integrated regulatory programs in the following areas: human and veterinary drugs; biological products; medical devices and radiological health; bioresearch monitoring (BIMO); food and feed; and tobacco.

These action plans focus on what will be accomplished in FY 2015 and outline the need to develop detailed future plans for the next five years in some cases. The plans represent what each Center and ORA have agreed are the critical actions to jointly fulfill FDA’s mission in the key areas of specialization, training, work planning, compliance policy and enforcement strategy, imports, laboratory optimization, and information technology.

Because each Center has a unique regulatory program to manage, there are understandably variations among the plans. However, there are also common features across most of the plans: the need to define specialization across our inspection and compliance functions; to identify competencies in these areas of specialization and develop appropriate training curricula; to develop risk-based work planning that is aligned with program priorities and improves accountability; and to develop clear and current compliance policies and enforcement strategies.

Below are some highlights from the plans that illustrate these features:

  • Establish Senior Executive Program Directors in ORA. In the past, for example, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) would work with several ORA units responsible for the pharmaceutical program. Now, the Centers will have a single Senior Executive in ORA responsible for each commodity program, allowing ORA and the Centers to resolve matters more efficiently.
  • Jointly develop new inspection approaches. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and ORA plan, for example, will begin to focus some inspections on characteristics and features of medical devices most critical to patient safety and device effectiveness. ORA investigators will perform these inspections utilizing jointly developed training.
  • Invest in expanded training across ORA and the Centers. The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and ORA will jointly develop a biologics training curriculum, redesign investigator certification, and cross-train Center and ORA investigators, compliance officers and managers.
  • Expand compliance tools. Field investigators will be teamed with subject matter experts from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the Center for Veterinary Medicine to make decisions in real time, working with firms to achieve prompt correction of food safety deficiencies and to help implement the preventive approaches outlined by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). If industry does not quickly and adequately correct critical areas of noncompliance that could ultimately result in food borne outbreaks, we will use our enforcement tools, including those provided under FSMA, as appropriate.
  • Optimize FDA laboratories. ORA and the various Centers will establish a multi-year strategic plan for ORA scientific laboratory work, including hiring and training analysts, purchasing and using equipment, and allocating resources and facilities. At the same time, ORA is committed to conducting an ongoing review of its labs to ensure that they are properly managed and operating as efficiently as possible.
  • Create specialized investigators, compliance officers, and first-line managers. A bioresearch monitoring (BIMO) working group is developing a plan for a dedicated corps of ORA investigators to conduct BIMO inspections, and a dedicated cadre of tobacco investigators is being established.

Working together to implement these action plans will take time, commitment, and continued investment and we’ll need to monitor and evaluate our efforts. These plans will help us implement the new FSMA rules announced in September, as well as the Agency’s new medical product quality initiatives under the FDA Safety and Innovation Act and Drug Quality and Security Act.

FDA’s Program Alignment is a well-thought out approach that responds to the needs of a changing world. I look forward to the ways in which these action plans will ultimately enhance the FDA’s public health and regulatory mission.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Re-scheduling prescription hydrocodone combination drug products: An important step toward controlling misuse and abuse

By: Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D.

Hydrocodone is the most prescribed opioid in the United States, including 137 million prescriptions in 2013. While it is useful in the treatment of pain, it has also contributed significantly to the very serious problem of opioid misuse and abuse in the United States. With the aim of curbing this misuse and abuse, new prescribing requirements go into effect today for hydrocodone combination products, which include products such as Anexsia, Lorcet, Vicodin, and some cough suppressants that contain both hydrocodone and another active ingredient, such as acetaminophen.

Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D.Under a final rule issued by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), hydrocodone combination products are now in a more restrictive category of controlled substances, along with other opioid drugs for pain like morphine and oxycodone.  After a scientific review, FDA made the recommendation that DEA take this step in December 2013. We concluded that hydrocodone combination products meet the criteria for control under Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act, and we believe DEA’s new rule will help limit the risks of these potentially addictive but important pain-relieving products.

Here are some of the key changes that will occur with the reclassification of hydrocodone from a Schedule III drug to a Schedule II drug:

  • If a patient needs additional medication, the prescriber must issue a new prescription. Phone–in refills for these products are no longer allowed.
  • In emergencies, small supplies can be authorized until a new prescription can be provided for the patient.
  • Patients will still have access to reasonable quantities of medication, generally up to a 30-day supply.

After DEA requested a scientific and medical recommendation from FDA regarding a change of schedule for hydrocodone combination products in 2009, FDA considered the eight statutorily required factors related to the abuse potential of hydrocodone. These included such questions as the products’ actual or relative potential for abuse, their liability to cause psychic or physiological dependence, and dangers they might pose to public health. After a thorough analysis of the available information, including a public Advisory Committee meeting to solicit input from outside experts and patients (the committee recommended upscheduling by a vote of 19 to 10), HHS recommended to DEA that hydrocodone combination products be reclassified into Schedule II.

We also recommended two other actions we believe are critical to maximizing the benefits to the public health of rescheduling hydrocodone:

  • Include rescheduling in a broad-based set of actions targeting abuse prevention. In particular, HHS identified a need to work with prescribers and patients to make certain that patients are prescribed the right number of doses of hydrocodone for a patient’s need to avoid unused hydrocodone being available for abuse.
  • Continue to monitor the use and abuse of hydrocodone combination products carefully to assess the impact of rescheduling on public health. Based on the results of this monitoring, we may need to take additional actions to support the appropriate use of hydrocodone combination products while reducing their tragic abuse.

FDA understands that it is crucial to achieve a goal of balancing the risk of abuse and misuse with the need to maintain access to these important medications that provide needed relief to people in pain. Rescheduling hydrocodone combination products is one important action in support of this goal.

Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D., is Deputy Center Director for Regulatory Programs in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

New Data Dashboard Tool Shares FDA’s Inspection, Compliance and Recall Data

By: Douglas Stearn

Douglas StearnAs part of our commitment to transparency FDA is pleased to announce that we have released a new online tool to provide insight into our compliance, inspection, and recall activities.

This new dynamic tool represents a departure from the downloadable spreadsheet-based datasets that we have posted in the past. Instead, the FDA data dashboard presents information in an easy-to-read graphical format. It also provides access to the underlying data allowing anyone interested to see related data and trends.

Our new dashboard provides data for FY 2009 to FY 2013, and allows access to data on:

  • inspections;
  • warning letters;
  • seizures and injunctions;
  • and statistics, specifically for recalls.

We plan to update the data semi-annually.

The dashboard is staged in a cloud environment, and it allows you to:

  • download information for additional analysis;
  • manipulate what you see by selecting filters;
  • rearrange the format of datasets and the way columns are sorted;
  • drill down into data; and
  • export charts and source information for further review.

We developed this new dashboard after President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum on Regulatory Compliance in January 2011.

The President directed federal agencies to make publicly available compliance information easily accessible, downloadable and searchable online, to the extent feasible and permitted by law. FDA formed internal working groups that same year to develop recommendations for enhancing the transparency of our operations and decision-making processes. These working groups identified an online tool as a way to present compliance and enforcement data in a user-friendly manner. The dashboard represents the latest example of our commitment to compiling and posting a wealth of FDA data  for public review and feedback.

FDA works within a global environment and is carrying out more inspections around the world. We collaborate with regulatory authorities across the globe to protect public health. Our data dashboard provides information about inspections in this global environment, and makes this information more readily accessible to the public. Now you can use the dashboard to see this kind of inspection-related information to better understand our regulatory decisions.

A “feedback mechanism” is available so you can send comments, questions or concerns directly to us at FDADataDashboard@fda.hhs.gov.

This rollout effort is part of FDA’s continuing commitment to share inspection, compliance, and recall data. We will continue to update the FDA data dashboard and provide public access to this timely and important information.

Douglas Stearn is Director of the Office of Enforcement and Import Operations within FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs

FDA Works to Mitigate the West Africa Ebola Outbreak

By: Luciana Borio, M.D.

Luciana Borio, M.D.The world is witnessing the devastating effects of the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, the worst Ebola outbreak in recorded history. To date, more than two thousand people in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have become infected, and more than twelve hundred have died. The stories of so many lives lost, and those of so many others fighting for their lives, are heartbreaking and tragic. We at the Food and Drug Administration are dedicated to helping end this outbreak as quickly as possible. And we are working hard to accelerate the development and production of treatments and vaccines to help prevent future outbreaks like this.

The primary approaches to contain the current outbreak remain standard public health measures. However, this outbreak presents complex challenges, in part because there are no FDA-approved treatments or vaccines for the Ebola virus. FDA has an important role during situations like this.

For example, we are working closely with U.S. government agencies that support medical product development – including the National Institutes of Health, the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) – to speed the development and production of medical products that could help mitigate outbreaks like this. And we are working interactively with medical product sponsors to clarify regulatory and data requirements in order to move investigational products forward in development as quickly as possible. We also are in close contact with the World Health Organization and several of our international regulatory counterparts to exchange information about these investigational products for Ebola treatment, and to exchange information about how FDA works to facilitate development of and access to these products.

The experimental vaccines and treatments in development are in the earliest investigational stages and have not been fully tested for safety or efficacy. Only small amounts of some experimental products have been manufactured for testing, which means few courses, if any, are available for companies to make available for compassionate use in response to this outbreak. We are working closely with our U.S. government colleagues to have experimental treatments and vaccines available for clinical evaluation in the next few months. We are hopeful that, in the future, we will have medical products approved and manufactured for wide-scale use to address the Ebola outbreak. However, these products are not at that stage yet.

In the meantime, FDA is doing all we can to alleviate the situation. FDA has one of the world’s most flexible regulatory frameworks, which includes mechanisms to enable access to available investigational medical products when, based on certain criteria such as the balance between expected risk and benefit to the patient, it would be appropriate to use such products.

For example, under certain circumstances, clinicians may request the use of an Emergency Investigational New Drug (EIND) application under the FDA’s Expanded Access program to access investigational products outside of clinical trials for their patients. And under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority, we can allow the use of an unapproved medical product – or an unapproved use of an approved medical product – for a larger population during emergencies, when there are no adequate, approved and available alternatives.

This month, we authorized the use of an Ebola diagnostic test, developed by DoD, under an EUA to detect the Ebola virus in DoD-designated laboratories. This test can help facilitate an effective response to the ongoing outbreak in West Africa by helping to rapidly identify patients infected with Ebola virus and facilitate appropriate containment measures and clinical care.

It is an unfortunate fact that, during outbreaks like this, fraudulent products that claim to prevent, treat or cure a disease rapidly appear on the market. FDA has learned of several fraudulent products that claim to prevent or treat this Ebola virus infection, including so-called natural remedies. Consumers who have seen these fraudulent products or false claims should report them to us. For our part, we will remain vigilant for fraudulent products and false product claims related to the Ebola virus, and will take enforcement actions as warranted to protect public health.

FDA stands ready to work with companies and healthcare providers to speed product development and to facilitate access to investigational products to treat patients when appropriate. We are fully committed to helping end this outbreak as quickly as possible and to sustaining our efforts to help prevent such outbreaks in the future.

Luciana Borio, M.D., is the Assistant Commissioner for Counterterrorism Policy and Acting Deputy Chief Scientist.

Clinical Trials: Enhancing Data Quality, Encouraging Participation and Improving Transparency

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Today FDA is announcing important steps that the agency plans to take to enhance the collection and availability of clinical trial data on demographic subgroups – patient populations divided by sex, race/ethnicity or age.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Section 907 of the 2012 FDA Safety and Innovation Act directed us to take a closer look at the extent to which clinical trial participation and the inclusion of safety and effectiveness data by demographic subgroups is included in medical product applications, report our findings, and then, within one year, produce an action plan with recommendations for improvements.

Our report, issued on August 20, 2013, found that the agency’s statutes, regulations, and policies generally give product sponsors a solid framework for providing data in their applications on the inclusion and analysis of demographic subgroups. Overall, sponsors are describing the demographic profiles of their clinical trial participants, and the majority of applications submitted to FDA include demographic subset analyses. We also found that FDA shares this information with the public in a variety of ways. Now, one year later, we’re releasing the FDA Action Plan to Enhance the Collection and Availability of Demographic Subgroup Data, which we developed after extensive interaction with stakeholders.

The action plan includes 27 action items that are designed to meet three overarching priorities – improving the completeness and quality of demographic subgroup data collection, reporting and analysis (quality); identifying barriers to subgroup enrollment in clinical trials and employing strategies to encourage greater participation (participation); and, making demographic subgroup data more available and transparent (transparency).

In addition to the action plan, we’re publishing a final guidance entitled, “Evaluation of Sex-Specific Data in Medical Device Clinical Studies.” It was written in response to the fact that certain medical devices may yield different responses in women than men, and yet women are under-represented in some medical device studies. This has led to less information for women regarding the risks and benefits of using these devices.

The guidance includes recommended methods for clinical study design and conduct to increase enrollment of men and women, if needed, and ways to analyze data for sex differences. FDA has held a series of public workshops to raise awareness about common strategies for enhancing recruitment and retention of women in medical device clinical trials. Fully integrating this final guidance into the templates used by FDA’s reviewers of medical devices, and providing a webinar for industry on how to use the guidance, comprise one of the 27 items in our action plan.

I hope you’ll find that the action plan is responsive and pragmatic and, most importantly, when fully implemented, it will improve medical care and public health. Many of the steps it outlines will have a broad impact on the work of FDA’s medical product centers and will require great thought and planning as they are implemented, depending on current evidence and available resources. The action items range from relatively short-term goals that can be achieved in a year, to others that will take 1-3 years, to a small number that will require a longer period, 3-5 years, to achieve.

Although the plan certainly places significant responsibilities on FDA’s medical product centers and other FDA offices, it also engages our partners inside and outside of government to share the responsibility for this important mission. For example, industry is being asked to help develop and share best practices for encouraging broad clinical trial participation, and the National Institutes of Health will be participating in several research projects with FDA.

We know that richer information is collected when different subgroups are enrolled in pivotal studies for medical products. This kind of enrollment in turn gives us greater assurance in the safety and effectiveness of the medical products used by a diverse population.

To set the plan in motion quickly, FDA is setting up a steering committee that will oversee implementation, come up with metrics for measuring progress and be responsible for planning a public meeting to be held within 18 months after release of the plan. FDA has already set up a website where the public will be able to track the agency’s implementation progress. That website will be updated on a regular basis.

Also, we’re reopening our Section 907 public docket to solicit comments for the action plan. I encourage everyone to review the document and consider how you might be able to partner with FDA and others in encouraging necessary and appropriate demographic subgroup diversity and representation.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA’s JumpStart program: Supporting drug innovation

By: Lilliam Rosario, Ph.D.

When it comes to public health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recognizes that innovation drives success.

Lilliam RosarioAs part of the HHS Innovates program, HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr acknowledge excellence in the field with the Secretary’s Pick Award, an honor that identifies and celebrates internal innovation by HHS employees.

I’m proud that this year, the winner of one of three Secretary’s Pick Awards was the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Computational Science (OCS), part of the Office of Translational Sciences (OTS) in the agency’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). OCS received the award for its work in developing CDER’s JumpStart program, an innovative initiative dedicated to enhancing the efficiency of CDER’s new drug development and review process.

The JumpStart program provides CDER’s new drug review teams with clinical trial data analyses early in the review process when they assess quality, data composition, exploratory analyses, and tools for the analyses. It gives the reviewers a “jump start” on their review providing the information on the quality of the submission as well as analyses to support an effective and efficient evaluation of the medical product submission. You can learn more about JumpStart here. 

Our congratulations to the two other Secretary’s Pick Award recipients, the “Breast Cancer Startup Challenge,” led by the National Cancer Institute, and “Whole Genome Sequencing: Future of Food Safety,” led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is a great honor to be recognized side by side with these two innovative programs!

We are proud of the team effort involved in making the JumpStart program a success, and look forward to continued efforts and innovative actions that will help bring safe, effective, and high quality new drug therapies to the American public as efficiently as possible.

For more information on HHS Innovates, visit HHS Innovates Celebrates 7th Round of Innovations!

Lilliam Rosario, Ph.D., is Director, Office of Computational Science, Office of Translational Sciences, at FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

Achieving our Mission through Enhanced IT Service Delivery

By: Walter S. Harris, M.B.A, P.M.P.

At its core, FDA is an information- and process-driven organization. Day-in and day-out, FDA’s experts make thousands of weighty and complex decisions by evaluating, and allowing access to, life-sustaining, life-enhancing and life-saving products. This is done using a vast amount of sophisticated and reliable data. And it is done while continuously engaging with consumers, patient representatives, industry, academia and other government agencies.

Walter HarrisSince the establishment of the Office of Information Management and Technology (OIMT) seven months ago, we have fundamentally changed how we support the Agency’s mission — primarily, to increase transparency, and better align functions and resources to achieve more efficient and improved customer support and services. To further these objectives, we have taken the following steps to help transform our service to our internal and external stakeholders.

  • Reorganized the Office of Information Management into a more stable structure that is focused on our customers and the delivery of services. This new IT structure includes robust leadership, increased scientific capability and closer attention to IT’s business and customer needs, including a new IT audit and compliance program.
  • Hired the first Chief Health Informatics Officer (CHIO), Taha Kass-Hout, MD, M.S., to promote and develop innovative enterprise solutions and identify opportunities for transparency and availability of FDA’s public health data to our consumers while ensuring accountability and privacy. With the launch of openFDA, we have demonstrated our ability to respond quickly and accurately to emerging scientific, technological and economic trends.
  • Requested that the CIO Council, FDA’s IT governance board with representation across all of its Centers, focus on opportunities to consolidate IT solutions into capabilities that benefit the agency, eliminating duplication of efforts and creating possibilities for reinvestment.
  • Creating an IT service cost-allocation model that will include a service catalog and identification of cost drivers for IT services.
  • Restructuring our IT portfolio to a service based portfolio model that is in alignment with our cost allocation model.

OIMT, together with IT leaders in the Centers, will transform our IT operation to minimize redundancies, streamline IT, and enhance customer service while lowering IT costs to the agency. We continue to seek opportunities to  identify and tackle issues, improve communications across functional lines, and more fully capitalize on the expertise of our talented staff.

These are exciting endeavors and I am proud of the efforts IT leaders across the FDA have taken to focus on customer service. With a renewed emphasis on service delivery to enable mission outcomes, we are better able to use resources in a manner that will achieve greater efficiency, improve support across the FDA, and provide results that benefit the public health.

Walter S. Harris, M.B.A, P.M.P., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Operations

Dr. Frances Kelsey, Who Protected Americans from Thalidomide, Turns 100

By: John Swann, Ph.D.

Today marks the 100th birthday of one of America’s most celebrated public servants. Frances Oldham Kelsey, Ph.D., M.D., was born in Cobble Hill, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and earned her Ph.D. in pharmacology and her M.D. at the University of Chicago. She was on the faculty of the University of South Dakota and practicing medicine when, in 1960, she accepted the offer to become a medical officer at FDA.

John SwannA month after assuming her position she was assigned the review of a new drug application for thalidomide, a sedative that had been used by expectant mothers and many others in dozens of countries since the late 1950s. U.S. law at the time required a firm to provide evidence of a drug’s safety as a requirement for sale. Despite the global popularity of this drug, and despite a constant and increasing pressure from the firm to approve the application, Dr. Kelsey refused to do that without adequate evidence that the drug was safe, a decision that was supported by her colleagues and superiors.

By late 1961 scientists discovered that thalidomide was responsible for crippling birth defects in thousands of babies in many parts of the world. Thanks to Dr. Kelsey’s “exceptional judgment in evaluating a new drug” — as her firm stand was described in the President’s Award for Distinguished Federal Civilian Service she received from President John Kennedy — the U.S. was mostly spared the tragedies. But the close encounter with a public health catastrophe convinced Congress and the White House to resuscitate proposals to revitalize the regulation of pharmaceuticals. The result was the 1962 enactment of the Kefauver-Harris Drug Amendments that mandated “substantial evidence” of a drug’s effectiveness as developed by “experts qualified by scientific training,” in addition to evidence of a drug’s safety, and provided for greater oversight of drug investigations. These and other requirements in the new law established a global standard for the evaluation of drugs.

Frances Kelsey

Dr. Kelsey today, pausing between crossword puzzles.

After 1962, Dr. Kelsey oversaw the evaluation of investigational drugs and, later, of oncologic drugs and radioisotopes. Concerns in the agency with problematical clinical investigations continued in the early 1960s, such that FDA created the Division of Scientific Investigations in 1967 and placed Dr. Kelsey in charge. She remained in this position until 1995. The division engaged in inspections of clinical investigators, animal studies, and institutional review boards involved in drug trials. Thus, Dr. Kelsey helped ensure the reliability of data vital to FDA’s evaluation of therapeutic products over a span of four decades.

Frances Kelsey, the recipient of the highest honor that can be bestowed on a federal civil servant, officially retired from FDA in 2005, but her commitment to the integrity of science in service to the public health continues to inspire those in the FDA and beyond.

To learn more about the life and work of Dr. Kelsey, see her “Autobiographical Reflections.”

More about thalidomide and the 1962 Kefauver-Harris Drug Amendments that came out of this crisis can be seen at http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/NewsEvents/ucm320924.htm.

John Swann, Ph.D., is an Historian at FDA

A Curriculum for Medical Device Progress

By: Francis Kalush, Ph.D.

Horace, the greatest Roman poet of antiquity, spoke of the need to “seek for truth in the groves of Academe” — and in the last four years, my colleagues in FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and I took his advice. In scores of meetings and two large workshops, we consulted with hundreds of academics about a novel idea: a university-level program to address an important public health need by stimulating the development of new medical devices.

Francis KalushIn 2011, CDRH embarked on an Innovation Initiative to help accelerate and reduce the cost of the development and regulatory evaluation of safe and innovative medical devices. Through that and other programs, we learned that the delivery of new therapies to patients can be accelerated if medical device innovators — including entrepreneurs and university students and faculty — understand FDA’s regulatory processes. We then established the Medical Device Technology Innovation Partnership, and tasked it with developing an educational program that would explain FDA’s standards and procedures for evaluating and approving or clearing medical devices.

This learning tool grew from collaborations with Stanford University, University of Virginia, Howard University, The Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland at College Park and at Baltimore, and University of Pennsylvania.

The program, called the National Medical Device Curriculum, will provide students at academic institutions and science and technology innovators with the core information about the regulatory pathway to market. This includes an understanding of the expertise needed to design, test and clinically evaluate devices; identify the root causes of adverse events and device malfunctions; develop designs for devices with repetitive functions; and, navigate FDA’s regulatory process.

The mode of the curriculum is a series of fictional case studies based on real-world medical device scenarios. The four learning tools developed so far cover the following subjects: the regulatory pathways for medical devices; safety assurance and risk management planning; and the regulatory pathways for novel devices and for devices that are substantially equivalent to already marketed predicate devices.

Each of these fictionalized case studies includes a student module and an instructor’s guide with ideas for exercises and discussion in class. The curriculum was tested at several universities and received high praise. For example:

  • William E. Bentley, from the University of Maryland James Clark School of Engineering found that the case studies “are of tremendous pedagogical value, and we are definitely incorporating them into our curriculum.”
  • ŸArthur L. Rosenthal, Ph.D., a professor at Boston University’s College of Engineering, used the case studies to teach advanced biomedical product design and development and reported that “the students found the material engaging as well as providing essential context for their projects.”
  • ŸYouseph Yasdi, Ph.D., MBA, executive director at The Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design, found that the cases are “a good fit” for his program to train engineers to better understand regulatory issues.

More case studies are being planned to help train the next generation of entrepreneurs and keep the U.S. a leader in medical device innovation. Regulatory training is particularly important in the development of medical devices, as the industry is heavily populated by small companies that may not have the expertise to navigate FDA’s requirements.

The National Medical Device Curriculum is a step forward in our Agency’s efforts to encourage and facilitate the development of new medical products — drugs, biological products and medical devices — that has been made possible by the great scientific breakthroughs in the last two decades, such as the mapping of the human genome and the invention of nanotechnology. Those of us who worked on this novel curriculum hope it will encourage and advance the development of new devices for patients and help protect and promote the public health.

Francis Kalush, Ph.D., is a senior science advisor at FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health

FDA Salutes World Sickle Cell Awareness Day

By: Jonca Bull, M.D.

Today is a World Sickle Cell Awareness Day, an annual reminder that Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a major area of unmet medical need that causes serious and devastating consequences to many thousands of children and adults. It is an occasion that has been commemorated each year since 2008, when the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted a resolution recognizing SCD as a global public health concern. I am happy to have this opportunity to help raise awareness about the impact of this disease on patients and their families, and to emphasize the need for additional therapies to prevent or treat SCD and its complications.

Jonca BullSCD is a genetic disorder that most commonly affects people of African descent; however, it also affects Hispanics, Asians, and people of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern descent. Millions of people are living with this disease all over the world. Here in the U.S., there are about 100,000 people with SCD and it is estimated that the disease occurs in one of every 500 Black or African American and one out of every 36,000 Hispanic-American births. Additionally, one in 12 African Americans carry sickle cell trait, the gene for the disease. People with SCD have “sickled” or abnormally shaped red blood cells that get stuck in small blood vessels blocking the flow of blood and oxygen to major organs in the body. These blockages can cause severe pain, organ damage or even stroke in some cases. SCD is a chronic and debilitating disease affecting people for their entire lives.

The Food and Drug Administration is committed to continuing the dialogue around Sickle Cell Disease to facilitate the development of safe and effective treatments to prevent the disease or reduce its complications. On February 7, 2014, our agency held a Patient-Focused Drug Development meeting to ask patients with SCD and their families, caretakers, and advocates about the various aspects of their disease and how it affects their lives on a daily basis. We heard from approximately 300 people on their treatment regimens, symptoms and complications from treatments, and what they would like to see in terms of future treatments. FDA learned a great deal from this meeting, and we hope this is the first of many successful collaborations leading to the development and approval of effective therapies for SCD.

Only limited treatment options exist for this disease, and more development is needed. In 1998, the FDA approved hydroxyurea to reduce the frequency of pain crises and the need for blood transfusions in adult patients with Sickle Cell Anemia. While the use of hydroxyurea has proven to be helpful in reducing complications in some patients, it is not universally effective and the mechanism of action is not completely understood. Other treatments, such as chronic transfusion therapy, although effective for some, can present problems for patients, which limits their use. Stem cell transplantation has been noted as a potential cure for SCD, but due to the lack of matched donors and associated risks during and after the procedure, this is also a limited option. As part of the FDA’s effort to facilitate the development of new SCD treatments, our Office of Minority Health has funded research to identify new methods to improve the safety and availability of blood for transfusion, and FDA’s drug experts are working with members of the pharmaceutical industry and outside researchers.

As we take the time today to reflect on the impact of Sickle Cell Disease, our agency encourages the search for new and better SCD therapies through medical innovation by using information gained from patients and their caregivers in the recent Patient-Focused Drug Development Meeting on Sickle Cell Disease. We will continue to join our efforts with those of patients, researchers, industry, and sister agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health, to lessen the burden of Sickle Cell Disease across the globe.

Jonca Bull, M.D., is Director of FDA’s Office of Minority Health