China Journal: strengthening relationships to protect public health

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

I am just about to wrap up a jam-packed five-day visit to China, a fascinating country with a dramatically growing economy and with an increasingly significant impact on the products that Americans consume. Indeed, a key reason for my trip is the important and growing collaboration between FDA and our counterpart agencies in China to ensure the safety of the large volume of foods and medical products exchanged between our two nations.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Of the 200 countries that export their products to the United States, China ranks first in exports (in dollar value) to our nation. It is the sixth largest provider of food and the sixth largest provider of drugs and biologics. Only the United States has more FDA-registered drug establishments than China. And these numbers are growing. Between 2007 and 2013, China’s annual exports of FDA-regulated products to the U.S. nearly quadrupled, reaching 5.2 million “lines” (portions of a shipment) of imported goods in 2013.

Ensuring the safety and quality of these and other U.S.-destined FDA-regulated goods is a major challenge. To meet it, FDA has transformed itself— from a domestic agency that focused primarily on products manufactured in the U.S. to a truly global agency grappling with the many challenges of globalization.

Among the many efforts in this area, an important component is the FDA’s establishment of permanent outposts staffed by FDA experts in all major exporting regions, including in China. We have 13 FDA staff members currently stationed in the country, primarily in Beijing. Their job is to help ensure that the food and medical products being exported from China meet our standards. FDA’s China Office does this by providing significant support for the Agency’s inspections in China, by strengthening our relationships with Chinese regulators, by working with industry and other stakeholders, by providing important information and technical assistance to all interested parties, and by analyzing trends and events that might affect the safety of FDA-regulated products exported from China to the United States.

Given the volume of U.S. trade with China, we are working to more than triple the number of American staff we place in China. Placing more FDA experts in China will allow FDA to increase significantly the number of inspections it performs in this dynamic, strategic country, as well as to be more effective partners with our colleagues here in China. Such dramatic staffing increases will also allow FDA to enhance its training efforts and technical collaboration with Chinese regulators, industry and others.

This week, we took an important step forward in strengthening our relationship with China when we signed an Implementing Arrangement with the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA). We expect to sign a similar Implementing Arrangement with the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) in the coming weeks. These documents, which build on 2007 agreements with the same two agencies, help to frame the work our inspectors will do in China and create mechanisms for collaboration on inspections.

FDA is also engaging with other stakeholders to create sustainable models for training future champions of regulatory science and quality. Here in China, we helped to create a world-class graduate degree program in international pharmaceutical engineering management (IPEM) at Peking University (PKU), an institution renowned for educating Chinese leaders and thinkers.

This partnership with PKU began in 2005 with just two courses on current good manufacturing practices. These proved hugely successful, and drew attention from Chinese drug companies and regulatory agencies, as well as industry and regulators in neighboring countries. The following year, PKU established a master’s degree program in IPEM, with support from FDA and multinational pharmaceutical companies. The program was formally launched in March 2007, with courses in regulatory science, pharmaceutical science, engineering, and more.

One of the highlights of my trip this week was speaking to more than 200 PKU students, future leaders who will help to accelerate the modernization of this nation’s pharmaceutical industry. I discussed not only FDA’s growing regulatory cooperation with China but the importance of strengthening regulatory science in China to ensure that the highest standards are used to support the development, review, and approval of new medical products, as well as the manufacturing and safety monitoring of medical products. All of this can make an enormous difference in the lives of patients in China, the U.S. and beyond.

Also this week, I met with top Chinese regulatory officials, toured CFDA’s mobile laboratories that test for counterfeit drugs and contaminants in food, and attended the 9th International Summit of Heads of Medicines Regulatory Authorities in Beijing.

Throughout the week, we addressed tough problems that require global solutions. Our discussions ranged from how best to advance biomedical product innovation, expand access to important pharmaceuticals through generic and biosimilar regulatory pathways, and how coordinated action, along with using new, state-of-the art technologies and analytical methods, will more effectively protect the public from substandard or counterfeit products. We are also making tangible progress in strengthening FDA’s partnership with our Chinese counterparts to better oversee the increasingly complex international supply chain and to prevent problems before they occur.

As I prepare for the journey home, I am encouraged by what we accomplished. And all of this bodes well for our ability to promote and protect protect public health in the future.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

View Photos from China:

Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., tours an FDA China Office mobile lab that tests for counterfeit OTC drugs and contaminants in food

Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., meets with Chinese pharmaceutical executives

Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., with students of Peking University

 

FDA Encourages Development of Devices for Patients with Disabilities

By: William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H.

William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H.For people with disabilities, medical devices can offer a vital and potentially life-changing option. Take, for example, a patient who has had his arms amputated. Medications can treat phantom pain, but they can’t help that patient pick up a glass of water. But devices can—and do.

In recent months, FDA has reviewed a number of noteworthy products for people with disabilities. And it has approved, cleared or allowed manufacturers to market several new devices.

Products that have met FDA’s premarket requirements include:

  • The DEKA Arm System, the first prosthetic arm that can perform multiple, simultaneous, powered movements controlled by electrical signals from electromyogram (EMG) electrodes;
  • The Nucleus Hybrid L24 Cochlear Implant System, which can help people aged 18 and over (who don’t benefit from conventional hearing aids) with a specific kind of hearing loss; and
  • The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System, the first implanted device to treat adult patients with vision loss from advanced retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

FDA is committed to encouraging such innovation that benefits patients. We foster an approach that enables our staff to interact with device manufacturers and clarify our agency’s expectations for product evaluation. This communication can help new devices get to market in a timely fashion. We also listen to patients’ feedback, which helps us determine which devices may be particularly useful.

When it comes to regulatory decisions, we carry out tailored reviews that protect public health while advancing innovation. Each of the products recently approved or cleared by the agency has benefits that outweigh its risks. For example, in June we allowed marketing of ReWalk, a first-of-its-kind, motorized device. Risks associated with the exoskeleton-like device include pressure sores and injuries from falls. But the big benefit is that it can help patients with complete or partial paraplegia to actually walk in their homes and communities.

We have seen amazing advances in technology in recent years. These advances make it possible for manufacturers to address longstanding disabilities in innovative ways. That said, we will continue to acknowledge that all medical therapies have benefits as well as risks. So, when making regulatory assessments, we’ll make every effort to make sure our decisions are balanced, and to ensure that approved or cleared devices can aid the patients who use them.

In addition to helping patients across the country, we are committed to empowering agency employees. For instance, FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., recently held a meeting with the agency’s Advisory Committee for Employees with Disabilities (ACED). There, the committee provided an annual update and discussed topics that impact employees with disabilities, including making sure all buildings are accessible and facilitating access to assistive and adaptive technologies through a new Ergonomic Resource Center at our headquarters. And this month the committee held an additional, internal roundtable event to focus on continued awareness, timed to National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

People with disabilities make many important contributions to our agency and to society at large. It’s our goal and commitment to help them maintain an active lifestyle and enjoy a good quality of life.

William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H., is FDA’s Deputy Center Director for Science and Chief Scientist for its Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

FDA as part of a coordinated global response on Ebola

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

The tragic Ebola epidemic is an extraordinary global public health crisis, and FDA is taking extraordinary steps to be proactive and flexible in our response – whether it’s providing advice on medical product development, authorizing the emergency use of new diagnostic tools, quickly enabling access to investigational therapies, or working on the front lines in West Africa.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.FDA has an Ebola Task Force with wide representation from across FDA to coordinate our many activities. We are actively working with federal colleagues, the medical and scientific community, industry, and international organizations and regulators to help expedite the development and availability of medical products – such as treatments, vaccines, diagnostic tests, and personal protective equipment – with the potential to help bring the epidemic under control as quickly as possible.

These efforts include providing scientific and regulatory advice to commercial developers and U.S. government agencies that support medical product development, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). The advice that FDA is providing is helping to accelerate product development programs.

Our medical product reviewers have been working tirelessly with sponsors to clarify regulatory requirements, provide input on manufacturing and pre-clinical and clinical trial designs, and expedite the regulatory review of data as it is received. FDA has been in contact with dozens of drug, vaccine, device, and diagnostic test developers, and we remain in contact with more than 20 sponsors that have possible products in pipeline.

We also have been collaborating with the World Health Organization and other international regulatory counterparts—including the European Medicines Agency, Health Canada, and others—to exchange information about investigational products for Ebola in support of international response efforts.

Investigational vaccines and treatments for Ebola are in the earliest stages of development and for most, there are only small amounts of some experimental products that have been manufactured for testing. For those in limited supply, there are efforts underway to increase their production so their safety and efficacy can be properly assessed in clinical trials.

As FDA continues to work to expedite medical product development, we strongly support the establishment of clinical trials, which is the most efficient way to show whether these new products actually work. In the meantime, we also will continue to enable access to investigational products when they are available and requested by clinicians, using expanded access mechanisms, also known as “compassionate use,” which allow access to such products outside of clinical trials when we assess that the expected benefits outweigh the potential risks for the patient.

In addition, under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority, we can allow the use of an unapproved medical product—or an unapproved use of an approved medical product—for a larger population during emergencies, when, among other reasons, based on scientific evidence available, there is no adequate, approved, and available alternative. To date, FDA has authorized the use of five diagnostic tests during this Ebola epidemic: one was developed by DoD, two were developed by CDC, and this week FDA issued EUAs for two new, quicker Ebola tests made by BioFire Defense.

To further augment diagnostic capacity, we have contacted several commercial developers that we know are capable of developing rapid diagnostic tests and have encouraged them to work with us to quickly develop and make available such tests. Several entities have expressed interest and have initiated discussions with FDA.

We also are monitoring for fraudulent products and false product claims related to the Ebola virus and taking appropriate action to protect consumers. To date, we have issued warning letters to three companies marketing products that claim to prevent, treat or cure infection by the Ebola virus, among other conditions. Additionally, we are carefully monitoring the personal protective equipment (PPE) supply chain to help ensure this essential equipment continues to be available to protect health care workers.

And at least 12 FDA employees are being deployed to West Africa as part of the Public Health Service’s team to help with medical care. We are proud that they are answering the call.

As you can see, FDA has been fully engaged in response activities and is using its authorities to the fullest extent possible to continue its mission to protect and promote the public health, both domestically and abroad. Our staff is fully committed to responding in the most proactive, thoughtful, and flexible manner to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

I could not be more proud of the dedication and leadership that the FDA staff involved in this response has shown. I therefore want to take this opportunity to thank more than 250 staff, including those soon to be on the ground in West Africa, who have already contributed countless hours to this important effort, and who will continue to do so in the coming days and weeks as we address this very serious situation. I am hopeful that our work and the coordinated global response will soon lead to the end of this epidemic and help reduce the risk of additional cases in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

FDA Working to Keep Patients Well Informed

By: Steve L. Morin R.N., B.S.N.

Steve Morin_2823My job in the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs (OHCA) is to serve our nation’s patients in two ways: by listening to their concerns regarding FDA’s policy and decision-making and advocating for them in our agency;  and by informing many patients and patient organizations about FDA’s mission and its work to advance the development, evaluation and approval of new therapeutic products.

This dialogue was formalized and greatly expanded in 2012 when, after a series of listening sessions with many patient advocacy organizations, OHCA created the Patient Network.

Specifically designed for patients, caregivers, patient advocates and disease-specific patient advocacy organizations and the communities that advocate on their behalf, this program serves two goals. It facilitates patient engagement with FDA policy and decision makers, and it educates its audience about the process that brings new medications – both prescription and over-the-counter ­– and medical devices from a concept to the marketplace.

Our Patient Network covers a range of FDA-specific topics and conducts numerous activities that are of interest to patients and patient advocates. One of these activities were webinars with information about upcoming public meetings hosted by FDA.

For example on March 31, 2014, OHCA was pleased to host the first-of-its-kind “LiveChat” with the diabetes community. This online discussion gave patients an opportunity to interact with FDA experts and to better understand a recently released draft guidance dealing with the studies and criteria that FDA recommends be used when submitting premarket notifications (510(k)s) for blood glucose meters.

On September 10, 2014, our Third Annual Patient Network Meeting titled “Under the Microscope: Pediatric Product Development” brought together more than 100 patients, patient advocates, representatives of academia and industry, and FDA leaders. The participants discussed pediatric product development and the ways patient advocates can participate in it.

And on September 17, 2014, our Patient Network webpages were upgraded. The “For Patients” section on FDA’s website is presented in a clear manner with easy-to-use formats. Also, a “For Patients” button is located on our homepage.

We have continued to pursue our goals of informing the public and engaging with patients by building upon the patient-centered webpages and enhancing activities that express our desire to be helpful and transparent. This is our philosophy that has helped the Patient Network evolve to what you see today.

As the Patient Network program continues to grow, I hope to expand it to have more interactive webinars like the “LiveChat” that address specific concerns  of the patient communities. Also, we will continue to make it possible for patients to learn from FDA experts who approve medical products.

The FDA realizes that listening to the “patient voice” and conducting our dialogue is important, and it continues to develop its model for patient involvement through the Patient-Focused Drug Development Meetings and other OHCA sponsored meetings and webinars. We hope patients and those who care for them will join us in that effort, and make it still more helpful in protecting and promoting the public health.

Steve L. Morin, R.N., B.S.N., is a Commander of the United States Public Health Service and the Manager of the Patient Network in FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs

Regulatory Science Collaborations Support Emergency Preparedness

By: Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S.

Scientists love a challenge. And coordinating government agencies, healthcare providers, and numerous additional partners to protect public health in emergency situations is definitely a challenge.

Jean Hu-Primmer

Jean Hu-Primmer, Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA’s Medical Countermeasures Initiative (MCMi) is working with federal agencies (through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise), product developers, healthcare professionals, and researchers, among other partners, to help translate cutting-edge science and technology into safe, effective medical countermeasures. Through these collaborations, MCMi supports research to help develop solutions to complex regulatory science challenges.

Data are critical to help FDA evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medical countermeasures—products that can save lives—during public health emergencies. But collecting data in the midst of an emergency is exceptionally challenging. Working with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), FDA is teaming with critical care physicians nationwide to help address these challenges.

Under a contract awarded last month, FDA and BARDA will work with the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group (USCIITG) to gather important information about medical countermeasures used during public health emergencies. Physicians will help address challenges with collecting and sharing data rapidly in emergencies, including streamlining electronic case reporting for clinical trials and rapidly disseminating key findings to FDA and other stakeholders to support clinical decision-making.

During this four-year project, USCIITG will also develop and pre-position a simple influenza treatment protocol in 10 hospitals throughout the U.S. during the 2015-2016 influenza season. The project will help doctors more easily use an investigational treatment protocol for patients with severe influenza, and test the data collection and reporting system during peak times. The goal is to help streamline the process during future influenza seasons and emergencies.

When it is not ethical or feasible to test the effectiveness of products in humans—such as countermeasures for potential bioterror agents—products may be approved under the Animal Rule. When products are approved under the Animal Rule, FDA requires additional studies, called phase 4 clinical trials, to confirm safety and effectiveness. In addition to the MCMi work, BARDA is funding USCIITG to investigate conducting phase 4 clinical studies during public health emergencies. USCIITG partners will train on these protocols, have them reviewed through their Institutional Review Boards (a requirement for all human studies), and create plans for enactment. USCIITG will then conduct an annual exercise to test these plans, a unique approach to broader science preparedness.

MCMi has also recently awarded regulatory science contracts to support other aspects of emergency preparedness, including two projects to investigate decontamination and reuse of respirators in public health emergencies (awarded to Battelle and Applied Research Associates, Inc.), and an award to support appropriate public use of medical countermeasures through effective emergency communication.

Our work involves big challenges. Through regulatory science, and through new and expanding collaborations, we continue to address these challenges to better prepare our nation to use medical countermeasures in emergencies.

Want to help? We’re currently accepting submissions for additional research to support medical countermeasure preparedness. If you have an idea for a new medical countermeasure regulatory science collaboration, we’d love to hear from you.

You can also visit BARDA’s MCM Procurements and Grants page for more information.

Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S., is Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA and the Cybersecurity Community: Working Together to Protect the Public Health

By: Suzanne Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A.

Cyber vulnerabilities – bugs or loopholes in software codes or other unintentional access points – are a real and constant threat to our networked laptops, mobile phones, or tablets. The Heartbleed virus and security breaches at major retailers are just a few recent examples of exploits of this hazard that have been in the news.

Suzanne SchwartzWhat you may not know is that there is a coordinated network of cybersecurity researchers, software engineers, manufacturers, government staffers, information security specialists, and others who share the responsibility of discovering and closing these security gaps. As a result, many vulnerabilities are detected and fixed before they seriously affect the public.

Medical devices that contain computer hardware or software or that connect to computer networks are subject to the same types of cyber vulnerabilities as consumer devices. The consequences of medical device breaches include impairing patient safety, care, and privacy. And as in the case of consumer devices, strengthening the cybersecurity of medical devices requires collaboration and coordination among many stakeholders, as well as a shared sense of responsibility for reducing the cybersecurity vulnerabilities.

This is why on October 21-22, 2014 the FDA, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) will host a public meeting, Collaborative Approaches for Medical Device and Healthcare Cybersecurity.   The purpose of the meeting is to catalyze collaboration in the health care and public health sector to more fully address medical device cybersecurity. The meeting will bring together medical device manufacturers; health care providers; biomedical engineers; IT system administrators; professional and trade organizations; insurance providers; cybersecurity researchers; local, state and federal government staffs; and representatives of information security firms. They will explore topics such as:

The cybersecurity of medical devices is an important part of public health safety, and the FDA has a significant role. In addition to convening this meeting, the FDA entered into a partnership with the National Health – Information Sharing and Analysis Center (NH-ISAC), a non-profit organization that closely cooperates with government agencies, and numerous health care and public health organizations. The partnership will enable FDA and NH-ISAC to share information about medical device cybersecurity vulnerabilities and threats. It will foster the development of a shared risk framework where information about medical device vulnerabilities and fixes is quickly shared among health care and public health stakeholders.

In addition, on October 1 the FDA released a final guidance for the Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices. The guidance recommends that manufacturers consider cybersecurity risks as part of the design and development of a medical device, and submit documentation to the FDA about the risks identified and controls in place to mitigate those risks. We think this will help improve the cybersecurity of medical devices and help contribute to the strengthening of our Nation’s health care cybersecurity infrastructure.

The FDA shares the responsibility of managing and reducing cybersecurity risks with many other stakeholders, and we look forward to hearing from them at the public meeting on October 21-22. We’re committed to working together to build a comprehensive cybersecurity infrastructure that can detect and respond to vulnerabilities in a timely way and that best protects the public health.

Suzanne B. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., is Director of Emergency Preparedness/Operations & Medical Countermeasures (EMCM) at FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

FDA’s Program Alignment Addresses New Regulatory Challenges

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Over the last year, a group of senior FDA leaders, under my direction, were tasked to develop plans to modify FDA’s functions and processes in order to address new regulatory challenges. Among these challenges are: the increasing breadth and complexity of FDA’s mandate; the impact of globalization on the food and medical product supply chains; and the ongoing trend of rapid scientific innovation and increased biomedical discovery.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The Directorates, Centers and the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) have collaborated closely to define the changes needed to align ourselves more strategically and operationally and meet the greater demands placed on the agency. As a result, each regulatory program has established detailed action plans. Specifically, each plan describes the steps in transitioning to commodity-based and vertically-integrated regulatory programs in the following areas: human and veterinary drugs; biological products; medical devices and radiological health; bioresearch monitoring (BIMO); food and feed; and tobacco.

These action plans focus on what will be accomplished in FY 2015 and outline the need to develop detailed future plans for the next five years in some cases. The plans represent what each Center and ORA have agreed are the critical actions to jointly fulfill FDA’s mission in the key areas of specialization, training, work planning, compliance policy and enforcement strategy, imports, laboratory optimization, and information technology.

Because each Center has a unique regulatory program to manage, there are understandably variations among the plans. However, there are also common features across most of the plans: the need to define specialization across our inspection and compliance functions; to identify competencies in these areas of specialization and develop appropriate training curricula; to develop risk-based work planning that is aligned with program priorities and improves accountability; and to develop clear and current compliance policies and enforcement strategies.

Below are some highlights from the plans that illustrate these features:

  • Establish Senior Executive Program Directors in ORA. In the past, for example, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) would work with several ORA units responsible for the pharmaceutical program. Now, the Centers will have a single Senior Executive in ORA responsible for each commodity program, allowing ORA and the Centers to resolve matters more efficiently.
  • Jointly develop new inspection approaches. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and ORA plan, for example, will begin to focus some inspections on characteristics and features of medical devices most critical to patient safety and device effectiveness. ORA investigators will perform these inspections utilizing jointly developed training.
  • Invest in expanded training across ORA and the Centers. The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and ORA will jointly develop a biologics training curriculum, redesign investigator certification, and cross-train Center and ORA investigators, compliance officers and managers.
  • Expand compliance tools. Field investigators will be teamed with subject matter experts from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the Center for Veterinary Medicine to make decisions in real time, working with firms to achieve prompt correction of food safety deficiencies and to help implement the preventive approaches outlined by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). If industry does not quickly and adequately correct critical areas of noncompliance that could ultimately result in food borne outbreaks, we will use our enforcement tools, including those provided under FSMA, as appropriate.
  • Optimize FDA laboratories. ORA and the various Centers will establish a multi-year strategic plan for ORA scientific laboratory work, including hiring and training analysts, purchasing and using equipment, and allocating resources and facilities. At the same time, ORA is committed to conducting an ongoing review of its labs to ensure that they are properly managed and operating as efficiently as possible.
  • Create specialized investigators, compliance officers, and first-line managers. A bioresearch monitoring (BIMO) working group is developing a plan for a dedicated corps of ORA investigators to conduct BIMO inspections, and a dedicated cadre of tobacco investigators is being established.

Working together to implement these action plans will take time, commitment, and continued investment and we’ll need to monitor and evaluate our efforts. These plans will help us implement the new FSMA rules announced in September, as well as the Agency’s new medical product quality initiatives under the FDA Safety and Innovation Act and Drug Quality and Security Act.

FDA’s Program Alignment is a well-thought out approach that responds to the needs of a changing world. I look forward to the ways in which these action plans will ultimately enhance the FDA’s public health and regulatory mission.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

New Data Dashboard Tool Shares FDA’s Inspection, Compliance and Recall Data

By: Douglas Stearn

Douglas StearnAs part of our commitment to transparency FDA is pleased to announce that we have released a new online tool to provide insight into our compliance, inspection, and recall activities.

This new dynamic tool represents a departure from the downloadable spreadsheet-based datasets that we have posted in the past. Instead, the FDA data dashboard presents information in an easy-to-read graphical format. It also provides access to the underlying data allowing anyone interested to see related data and trends.

Our new dashboard provides data for FY 2009 to FY 2013, and allows access to data on:

  • inspections;
  • warning letters;
  • seizures and injunctions;
  • and statistics, specifically for recalls.

We plan to update the data semi-annually.

The dashboard is staged in a cloud environment, and it allows you to:

  • download information for additional analysis;
  • manipulate what you see by selecting filters;
  • rearrange the format of datasets and the way columns are sorted;
  • drill down into data; and
  • export charts and source information for further review.

We developed this new dashboard after President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum on Regulatory Compliance in January 2011.

The President directed federal agencies to make publicly available compliance information easily accessible, downloadable and searchable online, to the extent feasible and permitted by law. FDA formed internal working groups that same year to develop recommendations for enhancing the transparency of our operations and decision-making processes. These working groups identified an online tool as a way to present compliance and enforcement data in a user-friendly manner. The dashboard represents the latest example of our commitment to compiling and posting a wealth of FDA data  for public review and feedback.

FDA works within a global environment and is carrying out more inspections around the world. We collaborate with regulatory authorities across the globe to protect public health. Our data dashboard provides information about inspections in this global environment, and makes this information more readily accessible to the public. Now you can use the dashboard to see this kind of inspection-related information to better understand our regulatory decisions.

A “feedback mechanism” is available so you can send comments, questions or concerns directly to us at FDADataDashboard@fda.hhs.gov.

This rollout effort is part of FDA’s continuing commitment to share inspection, compliance, and recall data. We will continue to update the FDA data dashboard and provide public access to this timely and important information.

Douglas Stearn is Director of the Office of Enforcement and Import Operations within FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs

FDA’s New Roadmap for Progress: Strategic Priorities 2014-2018

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates products that represent about 20 cents of every dollar American consumers spend on products. This includes the safety and effectiveness of drugs, medical devices, and vaccines, the safety of blood supply to food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that emit radiation, and more recently, tobacco. This fact can be easy to gloss over, but if one pauses for a moment to reflect on this fact, it is clear that the FDA’s regulatory role is large and truly meaningful to all of our everyday lives.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.When the FDA was first established, our regulated industries were predominantly local, the volume of imported products was low, and even the movement of goods across country was minimal. But times have changed, and so have the strategies we employ to address those changes. Over the last five years alone, the FDA’s regulatory portfolio has increased to now include regulating tobacco products, developing a new global system for protecting food safety, and addressing challenges created by the global expansion of research, commerce and trade.

In fact, more often than not today, a drug or medical product that ends up on the shelves of an American drugstore or in our hospitals will come, at least in part, from some foreign source. Nearly 40 percent of finished medicines that Americans now take are made elsewhere, as are about 50 percent of all medical devices. Approximately 80 percent of the manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients used in the United States are located outside our borders.

These and other new challenges and transformative developments in global science, technology and trade are rapidly altering the environment in which we work to fulfill our broad public health mission. In order to continue to carry out that mission, we need a set of clearly defined priorities and goals, as well as the strategies for reaching them. Therefore, I am pleased to announce the release of a revised set of FDA Strategic Priorities which will guide the agency in how we continue to promote and protect the health of the American public.

The new Strategic Priorities document sets the path for our Agency over the next four years. It establishes a framework for integrating our five strategic priorities – regulatory science, globalization, safety and quality, smart regulation, and stewardship.

Although each priority is significant in and of itself, the priorities are also interconnected and must not be addressed in isolation. In addition, this new roadmap sets forth FDA’s core mission goals and objectives, such as improving and safeguarding access to the products FDA regulates – and promoting better informed decisions about their use.

The Strategic Plan has been in development for more than a year and was created by a hard-working team of talented and knowledgeable FDA employees representing programs from across the agency. While this team drove the Plan’s creation, it is backed by the commitment of all of us at the FDA. My hope is that these priorities, which will be repeatedly cited in our speeches, policies and writings, will serve as our foundational guidepost, providing the strategic direction to help the agency continue to provide the level of service and protection the American people deserve.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

20 Years of Improving Women’s Health: 1994 – 2014

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.As we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the FDA’s Office of Women’s Health, I would like to highlight some of the work we’ve done to help improve women’s health, both looking across FDA and within the office. Whether it is approving new treatments for chronic conditions like heart disease, conducting research or helping to protect pregnant women from foodborne illnesses, the work we do at FDA makes a difference throughout a woman’s life.

Consider our product approvals. In 1996, for example, our agency approved a product for use in Pap smears that revolutionized the detection of cervical cancer; ten years later we approved the first vaccine for the prevention of this cancer. We have also approved advances in breast imaging, including 3D breast tomosynthesis and automated screening ultrasound.

We have encouraged innovation in lupus treatment and approved the first new lupus drug in 50 years. And we approved the latest generation of cardiac synchronization therapy devices which our own FDA scientists have shown particularly benefit women with heart failure.

FDA has also supported research to help us better understand how medical products affect women. Since 1994, the Office of Women’s Health research program has provided $30 million to support over 300 research projects, workshops, and trainings on a wide range of topics including cancer, HIV and osteoporosis. More than 25 percent of these research dollars have been directed at cardiovascular disease, the number one killer of women, with studies examining such issues as QT interval prolongation (a disorder of the heart’s electrical activity), how breast cancer drugs can affect the heart, and sex differences in various cardiac interventional therapies. FDA’s medical product centers have also sponsored women’s health research and initiatives such as the Health of Women Program that promote a better understanding of sex differences.

The results have been impressive: OWH’s research alone has been published in over 290 articles in peer-reviewed journals and has made impact on the regulatory decision-making process, including guidance documents, label changes, and standards development. Indeed, FDA’s guidance to industry is an important way that the agency has been helping to address important issues in women’s health.

Over the years, FDA guidance has encouraged greater inclusion of women in clinical trials and the evaluation of sex differences. Our own analysis last year found that women make up about half of the representation in these studies, but the numbers are lower for medical devices. So we have more to do and recently issued guidance to medical device developers to address this concern.

We have also made great strides in our communication and outreach to women during the past two decades. OWH’s Take Time to Care Program has built partnerships with other government agencies, retailers, and national organizations that provide millions of women with FDA safety information. Over the years, we have launched other educational initiatives like the Food Safety for Moms-to-Be and expanded the women’s health resources available via our “For Women” website and social media to make sure that women have tools to help them make informed decisions about the use of FDA-regulated products.

I am pleased at how much we have done to promote and protect women’s health since 1994. At the center of much of this change has been the consistent, driving force of the Office of Women’s Health and its determined leader, Marsha Henderson. I encourage you to check out OWH’s 20th Anniversary brochure to learn more about the progress that has been made. And I hope that you will collaborate with us on the work that still needs to be done.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration