Building Expertise and Crossing Boundaries to Improve Oversight

By: Howard Sklamberg, J.D.

To keep the food supply safe, have safe, effective, and high quality medical products, and decrease the harms of tobacco product use, we have to work with the rest of the world.

Howard SklambergAs FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy (GO), I oversee FDA’s efforts to further advance its thinking and strategies from a primarily domestic to a globally focused regulator.

GO coordinates the efforts of FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) and the Office of International Programs (OIP), and works with all of FDA’s product centers on scientific, manufacturing or other regulatory challenges. The highly skilled and dedicated workforce in ORA and OIP is responsible for conducting domestic and foreign inspections, deepening collaborations with local, state and foreign regulatory partners, helping these regulatory partners to strengthen their regulatory systems, and fostering the use of science-based standards and regulatory coherence around the globe to promote the public health of our citizens.

We have to be able to share information with our regulatory partners. We need their help to implement new regulations that have worldwide impact on the oversight of food under the Food Safety Modernization Act and medical products under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act. Working together with these partners, we can ensure an effective public health safety net for our citizens and communities.

An important new priority for FDA is to make fundamental changes in the way we operate in today’s world by aligning our efforts across the agency to keep pace with the acceleration of scientific innovation and the global expansion of the markets. So much of FDA’s work cuts across multiple product areas. How do we make that work as a large and complex agency?

Commissioner Hamburg and senior leaders across the Agency are committed to strengthening our ability to do just that and are collaborating to achieve greater operational and program alignment across the Centers and ORA.

A key part of this process is to enhance specialization across FDA. For ORA, enhanced specialization means that investigators, compliance officers, import reviewers, laboratory personnel, managers and others will have increased technical expertise in a specific commodity area and will work closely with subject matter experts in FDA’s centers. Over time, ORA’s geographic-based model will evolve to a commodity-specific, program-based model that will provide ORA staff the opportunity to gain increased expertise in specific product areas, such as pharmaceuticals, food, animal feed, medical devices, biologics, and tobacco. They will work as part of a team with the staff from other centers, collaborating, for example, with the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research on pharmaceutical oversight or with the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition on food safety issues.

It is especially important that experts in the centers and ORA be engaged in helping to develop compliance policies and priorities. Working with the centers on these broader concerns puts ORA investigators and compliance officers in a better position to implement the preventive approaches contained in new statutes and work together more seamlessly with the centers.

These and other changes that are part of the agency’s focus on program alignment will deepen our knowledge and make us more effective and efficient, with more clarity and coherence in our communications and actions.

This process is still in its early stages. There is a lot of planning still to be done, and we will work to ensure a transparent and inclusive process. Nevertheless, change is coming and I am excited and proud to be part of a transformation that can only strengthen our efforts to safeguard the foods and medical products that are so important in the lives of people all over the world.

Howard Sklamberg, J.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

FDA Works with China to Ensure Medical-Product Safety

By: Christopher Hickey, Ph.D.

Americans benefit greatly from medical products produced by other countries. Approximately 40 percent of finished drugs in the United States come from overseas, as well as more than 50 percent of all medical devices. About 80 percent of the manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients are located outside the United States.

Christopher Hickey

Christopher Hickey, Ph.D., testifies April 3, 2014.

However, this rapid globalization of commerce presents challenges to regulators who oversee the safety and quality of medical products. Many of these challenges manifest themselves in China. As FDA’s country director for the People’s Republic of China, I testified on April 3, 2014 before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, an advisory panel created by Congress, on our work to ensure the safety and quality of medical products produced in China and imported into the United States.

China is the source of a large and growing volume of imported foods, medical products and ingredients. In the years spanning fiscal years 2007 and 2013, the total number of shipments of FDA-regulated products from China to the United States almost quadrupled.

The challenges we see in China mirror those we see in other countries with developing regulatory systems. These issues include problems with data integrity, inadequate implementation of quality systems in manufacturing, and inconsistent regulatory oversight, among others.

As China’s role on the global stage expands, FDA has significantly increased drug and medical device inspections there, but we need to continue to strengthen our efforts. FDA is currently working to use Congressionally-appropriated funding to increase from eight to 27 the number of U.S. staff it posts in China. Visa issues that arose with the Chinese government over new FDA staff assigned there were addressed during Vice President Joe Biden’s visit to Beijing in December, and FDA continues its work to post new staff in Beijing in the coming months.

FDA recognizes that strategic engagement in China starts first and foremost with Chinese regulators. China’s Food and Drug Administration, or CFDA, is responsible for the regulation of food, drugs, and devices for domestic distribution in China, and for regulation of certain exported drugs and medical devices.

Senate Committee Hearing, April 3, 2014

Christopher Hickey, Ph.D., testifies before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission.

FDA has established a strong working relationship with CFDA. Our office has trained hundreds of Chinese inspectors in areas that include inspecting for good manufacturing practices and assessing the quality of data from sites that conduct clinical trials. Experts from FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health now meet regularly with their counterparts from CFDA under the auspices of the International Medical Devices Regulatory Forum. These investments will pay long-term dividends for the American people: a stronger Chinese regulatory system can only strengthen FDA’s efforts to promote and protect U.S. public health.

Finally, in the area of inspections and enforcement, CFDA inspectors now regularly observe FDA inspections in China. And since 2012, FDA’s Office of Criminal Investigations has worked closely with CFDA to fight against Internet-based, illegal distribution into the U.S. of falsified, counterfeit and adulterated drugs.

FDA’s priorities in China match its global priorities: we work to ensure the safety and efficacy of FDA-regulated products. Manufacturers are best situated to make certain that appropriate processes are in place to ensure safety and quality in production. Regulatory bodies should hold companies accountable for lapses in the production process. Inspections and testing are important tools in that process, but they must be used as part of a larger system that emphasizes a preventive, approach to the production of safe, effective, high-quality medical products.

And in our globalized world, it’s increasingly important that regulatory partners work together to ensure the safety of products as they move through increasingly complex supply chains. Patients and consumers – whether in Beijing or Boston – deserve no less.

Christopher Hickey, Ph.D., is FDA’s Country Director for the People’s Republic of China.

For more information, please visit this Web link:

China’s Healthcare Sector, Drug Safety, and the U.S.-China Trade in Medical Products

Visiting India: The Importance of Biomedical Research and Quality

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

As my busy and productive trip to India drew to a close, I had the opportunity for one final meeting and one last memory with a group of some of the country’s most extraordinary women. The occasion was a Women’s Roundtable in Mumbai, organized by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII). It brought together a diverse collection of female industry and academic leaders in India for a thought-provoking discussion and a wonderful chance to share perspectives with these accomplished women.

Commissioner Hamburg and members of the Women's Roundtable in Mumbai

Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. and members of Women’s Roundtable in Mumbai, India.

We covered a wide range of important and timely topics and could have gone on for much longer had time allowed. We discussed the many challenges that professional women often face in today’s workplace including efforts to achieve work-life balance and the importance of educating, motivating, mentoring and empowering women at every stage of both their professional and personal development. We also focused on a number of pressing issues in biomedical research, clinical trials and the regulatory framework for food and drugs.

What was most striking about this remarkable group of women is the commitment each has made not only to support one another in their diverse professional endeavors, but also to work to improve the lives of people living in India and around the world.

Two themes emerged during our discussion: the importance of biomedical research in India, specifically clinical trial design and enrollment; and the importance of quality and the role these prominent leaders in the pharmaceutical and food production sectors can play in communicating why quality matters.

The group expressed concern about the status of the clinical trial system in India. Many Indians have been wary of the way clinical trials have been conducted and how trial participants are chosen and informed. India has been in the midst of a significant re-examination of its clinical trial infrastructure and the legal, regulatory, ethical and scientific required for future research.

Certainly, we understand the importance of a vibrant, reliable and transparent clinical trials system. The information FDA receives and reviews from clinical trials conducted in the U.S. and abroad is an essential part of the agency’s decision-making for all new and existing drugs. Without it, we would not have important information such as how a drug works, whether it is reasonably safe for patients, and how the human body metabolizes the drug. Additionally, clinical trials may represent a vital mechanism to access an investigational drug for patients living with serious and life-threatening diseases.

Over the years, the FDA has worked closely with academia, industry and the advocacy community to improve transparency around the design and conduct of the clinical trials used to generate data for medical product review and approval. The agency has been working with the health care and research community to improve a clinical trial subject’s understanding of what it means to participate in a clinical trial, as well as the specifics of the trial in which they are considering enrollment.

Because the information we learn from clinical trials has the potential to benefit people living around the world – and the trials may be conducted in a wide range of countries – it is important that government officials, industry, the research community and patient organizations work together to ensure appropriate human subject protections, rigorous clinical trial design, and needed health care. We look forward to continuing our discussions with government, industry and academia on these important topics.

Quality was a recurring theme during my visit to India. I was pleased that the women who participated in the roundtable were as committed to quality as I am.  As leaders in their industries and academic institutions, these women are uniquely positioned to help reinforce the message that quality matters and to educate the next generation of leaders in their respective industries and organizations about the importance of building quality into everything they do. And I was delighted that the group appreciated how smart regulation can help shape, support, and strengthen the product development and manufacturing processes that can help ensure continuous quality. In the words of moderator Swati Piramal, one of the highest ranking and most eminent leaders in Indian Pharma today, “good regulators make good companies.” And that combination can lead to better, safer and higher quality products – which benefits the health of people in both our nations and around the world.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of Food and Drugs

Quality: A Recurring Theme During My Visit to India

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

As one of the Seven Wonders of the World, the Taj Mahal is not only one of India’s most sacred symbols, but one of the finest, most carefully designed architectural structures in the world. As I studied the details of the marble and embedded precious stones of the mausoleum during a recent visit to the city of Agra, I could not help but reflect on the care, craftsmanship and quality of the work that took just over two decades to complete. It was evident as I walked along with hundreds of other visitors in socked feet that those responsible for building the Taj and those that are preserving the centuries old structure are committed to extraordinary quality.

Commissioner Hamburg with A Didar Singh

FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., and A Didar Singh of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industries.

This vision of quality and care remained with me when I met with executives from pharmaceutical and food exporting companies operating in India. The roundtable meetings, organized by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industries, were an opportunity for me to learn about two of the largest business sectors in India and to hear from business leaders about the challenges they are facing as a result of globalization.

One of the challenges cited by the pharmaceutical leaders is approval times for abbreviated new drug applications – the applications filed for generic drugs. I am happy to report that the FDA is working quickly to fulfil one of our commitments under the Generic Drug User Fee Act (GDUFA) – reducing the backlog of generic drug applications that were pending when the new user fee program went into effect on Oct. 2, 2012.  As of the end of January 2014, our Center for Drug Evaluation and Research had taken a formal action on 45 percent of backlogged generic drug applications. In December 2013 alone, the center completed 174 actions, including 30 full approvals for generic drugs.

GDUFA also requires that we step up our number of foreign inspections and gives us the funding to do so. Companies participating in both the pharmaceutical and drug roundtables said they were challenged by our heightened inspectional activities. I told them that every company supplying the U.S. market has the responsibility of ensuring that their products are safe, effective and of high-quality.

In my talks with regulators and companies here in India I have placed a great deal of emphasis on why quality matters. As I explained, quality is linked to product safety and without a direct focus on quality, the potential for patient harm increases significantly.

In recent years the FDA has identified significant lapses in quality by some companies operating in the U.S. and around the world. As a result, American consumers have had to endure greater risk of illnesses, recalls, and warnings about the products many of them rely on each day. This is unacceptable. Consumers should be confident that the products they are using are safe and high quality and when companies sacrifice quality, putting consumers at risk, they must be held accountable.

Regulatory agencies around the world share my vision for ensuring that consumers, patients and healthcare providers in all of our nations have access to high quality products. I am pleased that, as a global leader in the pharmaceutical and foods sectors, India will continue partnering with us to ensure that the companies exporting products to the U.S. are adhering to established quality standards.

On the home front, we at the FDA will also continue to increase our focus on quality. One way we are doing this is through the creation of a new Office of Pharmaceutical Quality that will create one voice for drug quality at the FDA and improve our oversight of quality throughout the lifecycle of a pharmaceutical product.

All companies must understand that quality is the basis for the public’s trust and confidence in their products and maintaining high quality standards is part of the cost of doing business.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

 

Visiting India: Sharing a Vision for Strengthening Food and Medical Product Safety

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Fresh mangos, bananas and other native fruits add a pop of color and provide the backdrop while we ride along the busy streets of Delhi. While en route to the first of several meetings I held with Indian regulators, I can’t help but marvel at the vibrant buzz of India’s capital and the progress that has been made since I traveled here years ago as a young woman. Since that time, the rapid globalization of commerce has posed significant challenges to ensuring consumer safety as the number of products and suppliers entering the U.S. has increased. India now represents the 3rd largest trade partner, 2nd largest supplier of over-the-counter and prescription drugs, and 8th largest supplier of food to the United States.

Margaret Hamburg and officials in India

(L-to-R) Arun Panda, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; Shri Keshav Desiraju, Secretary, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; Shri Ghulam Nabi Azad, Minister, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Dr. Altaf Lal, Director of U.S. FDA’s India Office; Nancy Powell, U.S. Ambassador to India.

On Monday, I began my first official visit to the country as Commissioner of the FDA. I met with officials from the Indian government who oversee the country’s health-related matters as well as those responsible for overseeing the export of foods to the U.S. and more than 200 countries around the world. These meetings provided the opportunity for me to discuss our shared vision for strengthening the quality of the foods and medical products exported from India to the United States. Ultimately this vision is intended to enhance consumer confidence in these products both at home and abroad.

As two of the largest democracies in the world, our countries have enjoyed an enduring partnership and commitment to collaborate on initiatives designed to enhance both our economies and the lives of the people in our respective countries.

Ensuring that the products distributed in the United States meet our requirements for product safety and quality is among my top priorities as Commissioner. Unfortunately the many Indian companies that understand good manufacturing and quality processes have been overshadowed by recent lapses in quality at a handful of pharmaceutical firms.

While the FDA will take appropriate action against any company that doesn’t meet our requirements, we are also willing to work with them to address their issues. All consumers deserve access to safe and affordable drugs and should not have to sacrifice quality to get that.

Officials at India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare share this goal. In the spirit of continued collaboration and a commitment to quality, our agencies signed the first-ever Statement of Intent. Our organizations plan to collectively work together to improve the lines of communication between our agencies and work diligently to ensure that the products being exported from India are safe and of high quality.

While the Statement of Intent is an important milestone, I am proud to report that FDA’s Office in India has already been working closely with India’s drug regulators to reinforce the importance of producing quality products for patients. Drug and food regulators in India have participated in FDA-hosted workshops and observed FDA inspections of manufacturing facilities and clinical sites with operations in India.

During my visit I am eager to learn more about the industries that produce products for the United States and to meet with business leaders where I will reinforce our expectations that they meet our requirements for ensuring that consumers here and around the world have access to safe and high-quality products.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA and Health Canada: Working Together for an Efficient Pathway for Drug Applications

By:  Robert Yetter, PhD 

At FDA, we work closely with national regulatory agencies around the world on issues relating to the safety, efficacy and availability of medical products. An exciting example of such collaborative efforts is the Common Electronic Submissions Gateway (or CESG), an outcome of the US-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC). Through a cooperative research and development agreement, FDA worked with our counterparts in Health Canada, to share technology that will make it more efficient for industry to submit applications to both the U.S. and Canada for the approval of pharmaceutical and biological products. A common infrastructure would enable industry to submit to both countries using the same electronic format for technical documents. 

Robert YetterThe RCC Initiative was announced in February 2011 by President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Its goals are to promote economic growth, job creation and benefits to consumers and businesses through increased regulatory transparency and coordination. The electronic submissions gateway is one such project designed to meet those goals. 

So just what is this gateway? It’s an electronic “post office” that uses secure Internet connections to receive electronic versions of medical product applications and related documents from industry sponsors seeking regulatory approval. The technology was developed under contract, and implementation at FDA was led by the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.  FDA’s Electronic Submissions Gateway (ESG) has been in operation since 2006. It has now been modified to accommodate submissions from both Canada and the U.S. using the same interface and technology, and subsequently sending those submission transmissions to one or both regulatory authorities. 

The collaboration on the Common Electronic Submissions Gateway has the potential to yield long-term positive outcomes for both FDA and Health Canada. The collaboration continues the work between the two regulatory partners to streamline both agencies’ submission requirements while maintaining consistency in regulatory requirements. It could also lead to cost reductions for regulated industry, which would not have to follow separate technical requirements for submission to the two countries. 

We’re very proud of our work with Health Canada to make this technology accessible in a relatively short amount of time, going from concept to delivery in 26 months. This is yet another example of the steps FDA is taking as part of our Global Initiative, which envisions enhanced collaboration with our regulatory partners. 

Robert Yetter, PhD, is the Associate Director for Review Management in FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

We Moved Forward on Many Fronts This Year

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

At the FDA, the agency that I’ve had the privilege to lead for the past five years, I am gratified to report that we have a lot to be proud of this year. In fact, this past year’s accomplishments on behalf of public health have been as substantial as any in FDA’s recent history.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.We moved significantly forward, for example, in creating a system that will reduce foodborne illness, approving novel medical products in cutting-edge areas of science, and continuing to develop our new tobacco control program. We worked successfully with Congress and with regulated industry to reach agreement on a number of difficult issues, while continuing to use the law to the full extent possible to protect consumers and advance public health.

While there were many significant actions and events to recognize, below are some of the highlights of 2013.

In the foods area, there were many new actions this year that will have a long-standing impact on improving our food supply for consumers. Throughout the year we have been proposing new rules to reach the goals set forth by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). These science-based standards will help ensure the safety of all foods produced for our market, whether they come from the U.S. or from other countries.

We also took important steps towards reducing artery-clogging trans fat in processed foods, and understanding the health impact of arsenic in rice. With a final rule that defines when baked goods, pastas and other foods can be considered free of gluten, people with celiac disease can have confidence in foods labeled “gluten free.” And we are studying whether adding caffeine to foods may have an effect on the health of young people and others.

There have likewise been many accomplishments in advancing the safety and effectiveness of medical products. We worked closely with Congress on the recently enacted Drug Quality and Security Act, which contains important provisions relating to the oversight of human drug compounding. The law also has provisions to help secure the drug supply chain so that we can better help protect consumers from the dangers of counterfeit, stolen, contaminated, or otherwise harmful drugs.

Using tools provided by last year’s landmark Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), we are continuing to improve the speed and efficiency of medical product reviews, including those involving low-cost, high quality generic drugs and innovative new medical devices. The average number of days it takes for pre-market review of a new medical device has been reduced by about one-third since 2010. The percentage of pre-market approval applications that we approve has increased since then, after steadily decreasing each year since 2004.

We launched a powerful new tool to accelerate the development and review of “breakthrough therapies,” allowing FDA to expedite development of a drug or biologic (such as a vaccine) if preliminary clinical evidence indicates that it may offer a substantial improvement over available therapies for patients with serious or life-threatening diseases. This offers real opportunities to get promising drugs more quickly to patients who need them. In fact, using this new approach, FDA recently approved two advanced treatments for rare types of cancer and one for hepatitis C. We have also strengthened efforts to ensure product quality, increased protection of the drug supply chain, and reduced drug shortages.

We confronted the growing misuse of powerful opioid pain relievers by advising manufacturers on how to make these drugs harder to abuse with formulations that are more difficult to crush for inhalation or dissolve for injection. And we recommended that hydrocodone combination products be subject to stricter controls to help prevent abuse. 

We took an important step towards fighting the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by implementing a voluntary plan to phase out the use of antibiotics to enhance the growth of food-producing animals, and to move any remaining therapeutic uses of these drugs under the oversight of a licensed veterinarian. So-called “production” use is considered a contributing factor in the development of bacteria that are resistant to the antibiotics used in human medical treatment.

In many areas of our work we are supporting the emerging field of personalized medicine. Advances in sequencing the human genome and greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease, combined with increasingly powerful computers and other technologies, are making it possible to tailor medical treatments to the specific characteristics, needs, and preferences of individual patients.

Many cancer drugs today are increasingly used with companion diagnostic tests that can help determine whether a patient will respond to the drug based on the genetic characteristics of the patient’s tumor. In May, FDA approved two drugs and companion diagnostic testing for the treatment of certain melanoma patients with particular genetic mutations.

Advances in science and technology are also seen in the creation of new medical devices. For example, 3-D printing - the making of a three-dimensional solid object from a digital model – was once considered the wave of the future. But in February, FDA cleared for marketing a device created by 3-D printing – a plate used in a surgical repair of the skull that is built specifically for the individual patient.

While we have worked hard to get therapies to patients, we are at the same time using the tools available to us to remove unsafe and dangerous products from the market. In November, we used new enforcement tools provided by the food-safety law to act quickly in the face of a potential danger to public health presented by certain OxyElite Pro products. These supplements had been linked to dozens of cases of acute liver failure and hepatitis. After FDA took action, the manufacturer agreed to recall and destroy the supplements.

Finally, we made significant progress in implementing the letter and spirit of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. We have signed contracts with numerous state and local authorities to enforce the ban on the sale of tobacco to children and teens; conducted close to 240,000 inspections; and written more than 12,100 warning letters to retailers. And, in the first quarter of 2014 we will launch a public education campaign aimed at reducing the number of young people who use tobacco products.

All of us take great pride in the skill and vigor with which we overcame the year’s challenges and new demands. And so, as the year draws to a close, I extend my gratitude to the employees at the FDA who work tirelessly on behalf of the American public year in and year out. To all of our stakeholders, my heartfelt wishes for a joyous holiday season and a safe and healthy 2014.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

Your Input is Bringing Change to Food Safety Rules

By: Michael R. Taylor

Michael R. TaylorYou spoke. We heard you.

We began 2013 with the proposal in January of two rules required by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: the Produce Safety Rule and Preventive Controls for Human Food. The former would set science-based standards for the produce industry while the latter would set safety requirements for food facilities.

We were determined from the beginning to be transparent in our processes and to engage all stakeholders in the work of crafting final regulations that would work across the broad spectrum of food-producing operations. An unparalleled outreach effort followed the proposal of these rules. My team and I traveled across the country and around the world to discuss these food-safety requirements with the people who would be most affected, including farms of varying types and sizes.

In our travels, we saw first-hand how everyone is committed to food safety.  We especially spent a lot of time talking to farmers, both those who are smaller and work the land their family has owned for generations, and those who oversee large, diverse operations. We have heard concerns that certain provisions, as proposed, would not fully achieve our goal of implementing the law in a way that improves public health protections while minimizing undue burden on farmers and other food producers.

And because of the input we received from farmers and the concerns they expressed about the impact of these rules on their lives and livelihood, we realized that significant changes must be made, while ensuring that the proposed rules remain consistent with our food safety goals.

For that reason, we are planning to revise language in the proposed rules affecting farmers and plan to publish it in the Federal Register for public comment by early summer. These include changes to sections covering water quality standards and testing, standards for using raw manure and compost, certain provisions affecting mixed-use facilities (such as a farm that has a food-processing operation), and procedures used to withdraw the qualified exemption to these requirements for certain farms. As we consider the comments we’ve received, we may decide to include other changes for public comment. We recognize that completing these rules is essential to protecting the public health and are committed to completing them as quickly as possible.

We always knew that the rules governing farmers would be complex, in part because of the incredible diversity in the size and nature of farming operations. The standards we set must accommodate that diversity and be feasible to implement.

In our efforts to get first-hand information about how these rules would work in the real world, we visited nearly 20 states, Europe and Mexico; toured small and large farms and met with farmers across the country; met with the Amish, organic producers and other groups deeply involved in farming; collaborated with officials from other federal and state public health agencies; and held many public meetings. We also met with coalitions of consumer groups and other stakeholders. Our outreach work has been focused on ensuring that we never took our eyes off the ultimate goal: Keeping the food that you and your family eat safe.

We believe that this decision to change  these proposed rules—in response to the careful consideration of many people involved in supplying our food—is critical to fulfilling our commitment to getting them right. I urge you to review these changes when they are ready and let us know what you think.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

FDA Confers with International Counterparts to Advance Regulatory Science

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

I have recently returned from the 8th International Summit of Heads of Medicines Regulatory Agencies, which was hosted on December 3-6, 2013, by the Netherlands’ Medicines Evaluation Board in Amsterdam. These annual meetings are an important forum for the exchange of information, views and regulatory strategies among the chief executives of major and like-minded medicines regulatory agencies. I was particularly pleased to be able to contribute to these discussions as a speaker on a panel on regulatory science together with Dr. Tatsuya Konda, M.D., Ph.D., the chief executive of Japan’s Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The theme of this year’s summit was “Changes in the Regulatory Landscape,” and my foreign colleagues and I had plenty to talk about. Overcoming the challenges and reaping the benefits of regulatory science is even more critical today, when the FDA and other regulatory agencies face new and growing tasks in the global marketplace. All of us have to contend with the huge changes in the size and nature of international trade caused by emerging markets, developing economies, and increased cross-border flows of goods, information and capital.

As regulators, my international counterparts and I have many issues in common. They include the increasing complexity of new drug products and drug development; growing geographic distribution of markets; greater demands for public accountability and transparency in our work; budgetary and political challenges to regulatory oversight; and, the overriding need to keep up with the rapid changes in science and technology. Given these shared concerns, building cross-border partnerships and finding common solutions is paramount.

I reiterated to the conference our goal to encourage and strengthen cooperation and collaboration among those nations that are actively working to advance regulatory science. Regulatory science endeavors to use current and emerging knowledge to create new tools, standards and approaches for reliable assessment of the safety, effectiveness, quality and performance of medical products. At its best, this process is based on findings, evaluations, discussions and collaboration by scientists throughout the world.  And it is meetings like the recent summit in Amsterdam that help enhance this cooperation and the development of strategies that promote and strengthen the understanding, acceptance and application of regulatory science.

As the FDA embraces its international role in today’s complex regulatory environment, we fully accept the need to think and act globally more than ever before. I look forward to working with other nations’ regulators, the academic community, non-governmental organizations and industry as we join forces to advance regulatory science, the road to even better protection and advancement of the public health.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

Produce Safety Rule: The Partnership Continues

By: Michael R. Taylor

The comment period for the proposed produce safety rule closed on Friday, Nov. 22, but this is far from the end of FDA’s collaboration on produce safety with growers, the food industry, and consumers. FDA will continue to engage stakeholders, and we are committed to engagement through a final rule’s ultimate implementation.

Michael R. TaylorThe proposed produce safety rule is an important part of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), along with new measures to prevent problems in food processing facilities and strengthen our assurances that imported foods meet U.S. safety standards. When finalized, the produce rule will set science-based standards for the safe production and harvesting of fruits and vegetables, whether grown here or in another country. It’s crucial for all concerned that the final rule be both right for food safety and as practical and feasible as possible for the many produce operations involved in supplying fresh fruits and vegetables to America’s consumers.

To help get the rules right, my team and I have traveled our country to get input from the people who will be most affected and have the greatest expertise. Just in recent months, we have traveled to the Pacific Northwest, New England, Michigan, and California. We’ve toured all kinds of farms, from small ones that have been in the family for generations and grow many different crops, to huge farms that grow one crop. We’ve visited food hubs, roadside stores and irrigation districts. We’ve been joined by staffers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, extension agents, state agriculture commissioners and others. And there have been hundreds of listening sessions in which we’ve heard people speak frankly about their concerns about the proposed new requirements. What I want to say first to all the people we met and all those who have submitted comments is simply this:

Thank you.

The people I’ve met in all parts of the produce supply chain take great pride in the quality of their work and are committed to food safety. But they also feel that some parts of the produce rule as drafted won’t work, and they went to considerable effort – taking time out of their day, traveling to where we were, and waiting to speak to us – to help us understand their concerns. Particular concerns include the requirements that would affect irrigation water and the use of manure to fertilize crops. They also told us about parts of the rule with which they fully agree and want to be sure stay in place.

We now turn to the deliberations needed to craft a final rule, based on the thousands of written comments submitted to FDA and the input we received in our travels. While some concerns may be addressed through more precise language, others may need more changes, and a few may require substantial changes in what we’ve proposed. Rest assured that we will carefully consider these concerns and do whatever is possible to get these rules right. 

FDA will also engage stakeholders in the eventual implementation of the final rules. This includes continuing to work with the Produce Safety Alliance, state agriculture departments, and others in the produce community on education, training and technical assistance to support implementation by growers. They won’t be going it alone.

Keeping our food supply safe is FDA’s ultimate goal – and it’s a goal we know is shared widely by farmers, food distributors, and marketers throughout the food system. In field and factory, at the local food system level and over long supply chains, good people are working hard to keep your food safe. We look forward to an enduring partnership with this community as we work to finalize and implement the produce safety rule and the other important elements of the modern food safety system envisioned by FSMA.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine