FDA as part of a coordinated global response on Ebola

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

The tragic Ebola epidemic is an extraordinary global public health crisis, and FDA is taking extraordinary steps to be proactive and flexible in our response – whether it’s providing advice on medical product development, authorizing the emergency use of new diagnostic tools, quickly enabling access to investigational therapies, or working on the front lines in West Africa.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.FDA has an Ebola Task Force with wide representation from across FDA to coordinate our many activities. We are actively working with federal colleagues, the medical and scientific community, industry, and international organizations and regulators to help expedite the development and availability of medical products – such as treatments, vaccines, diagnostic tests, and personal protective equipment – with the potential to help bring the epidemic under control as quickly as possible.

These efforts include providing scientific and regulatory advice to commercial developers and U.S. government agencies that support medical product development, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Department of Defense (DoD). The advice that FDA is providing is helping to accelerate product development programs.

Our medical product reviewers have been working tirelessly with sponsors to clarify regulatory requirements, provide input on manufacturing and pre-clinical and clinical trial designs, and expedite the regulatory review of data as it is received. FDA has been in contact with dozens of drug, vaccine, device, and diagnostic test developers, and we remain in contact with more than 20 sponsors that have possible products in pipeline.

We also have been collaborating with the World Health Organization and other international regulatory counterparts—including the European Medicines Agency, Health Canada, and others—to exchange information about investigational products for Ebola in support of international response efforts.

Investigational vaccines and treatments for Ebola are in the earliest stages of development and for most, there are only small amounts of some experimental products that have been manufactured for testing. For those in limited supply, there are efforts underway to increase their production so their safety and efficacy can be properly assessed in clinical trials.

As FDA continues to work to expedite medical product development, we strongly support the establishment of clinical trials, which is the most efficient way to show whether these new products actually work. In the meantime, we also will continue to enable access to investigational products when they are available and requested by clinicians, using expanded access mechanisms, also known as “compassionate use,” which allow access to such products outside of clinical trials when we assess that the expected benefits outweigh the potential risks for the patient.

In addition, under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority, we can allow the use of an unapproved medical product—or an unapproved use of an approved medical product—for a larger population during emergencies, when, among other reasons, based on scientific evidence available, there is no adequate, approved, and available alternative. To date, FDA has authorized the use of five diagnostic tests during this Ebola epidemic: one was developed by DoD, two were developed by CDC, and this week FDA issued EUAs for two new, quicker Ebola tests made by BioFire Defense.

To further augment diagnostic capacity, we have contacted several commercial developers that we know are capable of developing rapid diagnostic tests and have encouraged them to work with us to quickly develop and make available such tests. Several entities have expressed interest and have initiated discussions with FDA.

We also are monitoring for fraudulent products and false product claims related to the Ebola virus and taking appropriate action to protect consumers. To date, we have issued warning letters to three companies marketing products that claim to prevent, treat or cure infection by the Ebola virus, among other conditions. Additionally, we are carefully monitoring the personal protective equipment (PPE) supply chain to help ensure this essential equipment continues to be available to protect health care workers.

And at least 12 FDA employees are being deployed to West Africa as part of the Public Health Service’s team to help with medical care. We are proud that they are answering the call.

As you can see, FDA has been fully engaged in response activities and is using its authorities to the fullest extent possible to continue its mission to protect and promote the public health, both domestically and abroad. Our staff is fully committed to responding in the most proactive, thoughtful, and flexible manner to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

I could not be more proud of the dedication and leadership that the FDA staff involved in this response has shown. I therefore want to take this opportunity to thank more than 250 staff, including those soon to be on the ground in West Africa, who have already contributed countless hours to this important effort, and who will continue to do so in the coming days and weeks as we address this very serious situation. I am hopeful that our work and the coordinated global response will soon lead to the end of this epidemic and help reduce the risk of additional cases in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

The more we know about rare diseases, the more likely we are to find safe and effective treatments

By: Janet Woodcock, M.D.

Janet WoodcockYou may be inclined to think that rare diseases affect only a tiny fraction of the more than 320 million people in our country. That’s true about a single rare disease. But there are about 7,000 rare diseases. If you add them all together, there are about 30 million – or almost one in ten — people in the U.S. with some form of rare disease. Sadly, although great progress has been made in some areas, many of these people have no FDA approved drug to cure their condition, help them feel better, or even slow the disease’s progress.

That’s why I am pleased about FDA’s support for an exciting new tool researchers are using to study rare diseases. It’s a new database with information about the diseases’ “natural history.”

“Natural history” is the scientific term to describe how a disease would progress with no treatment. Since a disease can affect different people differently, scientists must study many cases of a disease to acquire a thorough understanding of its natural history. Well-conducted studies of natural history can yield vital information about:

  • Biomarkers, demographic, genetic, and environmental variables that correlate with the course and stages of the disease;
  • Identification of patient subpopulations with different characteristics and effects of the disease;
  • Patient perspectives on what aspects of disease are most important to treat; and,
  • How to quantify those aspects so that they can serve as useful outcome measures for clinical trials.

But when it comes to rare diseases, their natural histories frequently are not fully understood because there are simply not enough cases that have been observed and studied. This lack of knowledge limits researchers’ ability to study rare diseases and develop new treatments. Knowledge of natural history is essential for developing more efficient clinical trial designs. It also could help reduce the length and cost of drug development and, possibly, contribute toward greater predictability of clinical development programs.

Recently The National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD), has teamed up with the patient advocacy group that represents people with the rare disease known as Von Hippel Lindau disease. This is a condition with many debilitating symptoms that also predisposes individuals to benign and malignant tumors. The Von Hippel Lindau Alliance and NORD have created an online tool that enables people with this rare disease to enter information about their experiences with the disease, such as the progression of symptoms, and to add to this information at intervals throughout their lives.

This tool is now helping researchers compile valuable data about the natural history of Von Hippel Lindau disease. The even better news is that this tool is universal.  If it can be used effectively to help researchers better understand Von Hippel Lindau disease, it can do the same for other rare diseases as well!

Importantly, this online tool was developed with direct input from patients, as well as patient organizations, researchers, FDA, and other international drug regulatory agencies.

The natural history tool has important features such as these:

  • It protects  the security and privacy of personal information, while making valuable information available to a researcher or drug developer interested in creating a new therapy for a rare disease;
  • It can be used by patients or health care professionals;
  • It helps make sure that text and online tools data are accurate.

FDA is committed to working with patient advocates and other organizations to support natural history studies for rare diseases.  We encourage the use of natural history data collection tools to describe natural history for many rare diseases. It is our deeply felt hope and wish that we can then take steps toward developing and approving new therapies for persons with rare diseases.

Janet Woodcock, M.D., is the Director of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

For more information about the NORD patient registry tool, visit their website: http://rarediseases.org/patient-orgs/registries

And please read: A Pivotal Moment for the Treatment of Rare Diseases — Address by Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg to the NORD Rare Diseases and Orphan Products Breakthrough Summit

Regulatory Science Collaborations Support Emergency Preparedness

By: Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S.

Scientists love a challenge. And coordinating government agencies, healthcare providers, and numerous additional partners to protect public health in emergency situations is definitely a challenge.

Jean Hu-Primmer

Jean Hu-Primmer, Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA’s Medical Countermeasures Initiative (MCMi) is working with federal agencies (through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise), product developers, healthcare professionals, and researchers, among other partners, to help translate cutting-edge science and technology into safe, effective medical countermeasures. Through these collaborations, MCMi supports research to help develop solutions to complex regulatory science challenges.

Data are critical to help FDA evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medical countermeasures—products that can save lives—during public health emergencies. But collecting data in the midst of an emergency is exceptionally challenging. Working with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), FDA is teaming with critical care physicians nationwide to help address these challenges.

Under a contract awarded last month, FDA and BARDA will work with the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group (USCIITG) to gather important information about medical countermeasures used during public health emergencies. Physicians will help address challenges with collecting and sharing data rapidly in emergencies, including streamlining electronic case reporting for clinical trials and rapidly disseminating key findings to FDA and other stakeholders to support clinical decision-making.

During this four-year project, USCIITG will also develop and pre-position a simple influenza treatment protocol in 10 hospitals throughout the U.S. during the 2015-2016 influenza season. The project will help doctors more easily use an investigational treatment protocol for patients with severe influenza, and test the data collection and reporting system during peak times. The goal is to help streamline the process during future influenza seasons and emergencies.

When it is not ethical or feasible to test the effectiveness of products in humans—such as countermeasures for potential bioterror agents—products may be approved under the Animal Rule. When products are approved under the Animal Rule, FDA requires additional studies, called phase 4 clinical trials, to confirm safety and effectiveness. In addition to the MCMi work, BARDA is funding USCIITG to investigate conducting phase 4 clinical studies during public health emergencies. USCIITG partners will train on these protocols, have them reviewed through their Institutional Review Boards (a requirement for all human studies), and create plans for enactment. USCIITG will then conduct an annual exercise to test these plans, a unique approach to broader science preparedness.

MCMi has also recently awarded regulatory science contracts to support other aspects of emergency preparedness, including two projects to investigate decontamination and reuse of respirators in public health emergencies (awarded to Battelle and Applied Research Associates, Inc.), and an award to support appropriate public use of medical countermeasures through effective emergency communication.

Our work involves big challenges. Through regulatory science, and through new and expanding collaborations, we continue to address these challenges to better prepare our nation to use medical countermeasures in emergencies.

Want to help? We’re currently accepting submissions for additional research to support medical countermeasure preparedness. If you have an idea for a new medical countermeasure regulatory science collaboration, we’d love to hear from you.

You can also visit BARDA’s MCM Procurements and Grants page for more information.

Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S., is Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA and the Cybersecurity Community: Working Together to Protect the Public Health

By: Suzanne Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A.

Cyber vulnerabilities – bugs or loopholes in software codes or other unintentional access points – are a real and constant threat to our networked laptops, mobile phones, or tablets. The Heartbleed virus and security breaches at major retailers are just a few recent examples of exploits of this hazard that have been in the news.

Suzanne SchwartzWhat you may not know is that there is a coordinated network of cybersecurity researchers, software engineers, manufacturers, government staffers, information security specialists, and others who share the responsibility of discovering and closing these security gaps. As a result, many vulnerabilities are detected and fixed before they seriously affect the public.

Medical devices that contain computer hardware or software or that connect to computer networks are subject to the same types of cyber vulnerabilities as consumer devices. The consequences of medical device breaches include impairing patient safety, care, and privacy. And as in the case of consumer devices, strengthening the cybersecurity of medical devices requires collaboration and coordination among many stakeholders, as well as a shared sense of responsibility for reducing the cybersecurity vulnerabilities.

This is why on October 21-22, 2014 the FDA, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) will host a public meeting, Collaborative Approaches for Medical Device and Healthcare Cybersecurity.   The purpose of the meeting is to catalyze collaboration in the health care and public health sector to more fully address medical device cybersecurity. The meeting will bring together medical device manufacturers; health care providers; biomedical engineers; IT system administrators; professional and trade organizations; insurance providers; cybersecurity researchers; local, state and federal government staffs; and representatives of information security firms. They will explore topics such as:

The cybersecurity of medical devices is an important part of public health safety, and the FDA has a significant role. In addition to convening this meeting, the FDA entered into a partnership with the National Health – Information Sharing and Analysis Center (NH-ISAC), a non-profit organization that closely cooperates with government agencies, and numerous health care and public health organizations. The partnership will enable FDA and NH-ISAC to share information about medical device cybersecurity vulnerabilities and threats. It will foster the development of a shared risk framework where information about medical device vulnerabilities and fixes is quickly shared among health care and public health stakeholders.

In addition, on October 1 the FDA released a final guidance for the Content of Premarket Submissions for Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices. The guidance recommends that manufacturers consider cybersecurity risks as part of the design and development of a medical device, and submit documentation to the FDA about the risks identified and controls in place to mitigate those risks. We think this will help improve the cybersecurity of medical devices and help contribute to the strengthening of our Nation’s health care cybersecurity infrastructure.

The FDA shares the responsibility of managing and reducing cybersecurity risks with many other stakeholders, and we look forward to hearing from them at the public meeting on October 21-22. We’re committed to working together to build a comprehensive cybersecurity infrastructure that can detect and respond to vulnerabilities in a timely way and that best protects the public health.

Suzanne B. Schwartz, M.D., M.B.A., is Director of Emergency Preparedness/Operations & Medical Countermeasures (EMCM) at FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

FDA’s Program Alignment Addresses New Regulatory Challenges

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Over the last year, a group of senior FDA leaders, under my direction, were tasked to develop plans to modify FDA’s functions and processes in order to address new regulatory challenges. Among these challenges are: the increasing breadth and complexity of FDA’s mandate; the impact of globalization on the food and medical product supply chains; and the ongoing trend of rapid scientific innovation and increased biomedical discovery.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The Directorates, Centers and the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) have collaborated closely to define the changes needed to align ourselves more strategically and operationally and meet the greater demands placed on the agency. As a result, each regulatory program has established detailed action plans. Specifically, each plan describes the steps in transitioning to commodity-based and vertically-integrated regulatory programs in the following areas: human and veterinary drugs; biological products; medical devices and radiological health; bioresearch monitoring (BIMO); food and feed; and tobacco.

These action plans focus on what will be accomplished in FY 2015 and outline the need to develop detailed future plans for the next five years in some cases. The plans represent what each Center and ORA have agreed are the critical actions to jointly fulfill FDA’s mission in the key areas of specialization, training, work planning, compliance policy and enforcement strategy, imports, laboratory optimization, and information technology.

Because each Center has a unique regulatory program to manage, there are understandably variations among the plans. However, there are also common features across most of the plans: the need to define specialization across our inspection and compliance functions; to identify competencies in these areas of specialization and develop appropriate training curricula; to develop risk-based work planning that is aligned with program priorities and improves accountability; and to develop clear and current compliance policies and enforcement strategies.

Below are some highlights from the plans that illustrate these features:

  • Establish Senior Executive Program Directors in ORA. In the past, for example, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) would work with several ORA units responsible for the pharmaceutical program. Now, the Centers will have a single Senior Executive in ORA responsible for each commodity program, allowing ORA and the Centers to resolve matters more efficiently.
  • Jointly develop new inspection approaches. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and ORA plan, for example, will begin to focus some inspections on characteristics and features of medical devices most critical to patient safety and device effectiveness. ORA investigators will perform these inspections utilizing jointly developed training.
  • Invest in expanded training across ORA and the Centers. The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and ORA will jointly develop a biologics training curriculum, redesign investigator certification, and cross-train Center and ORA investigators, compliance officers and managers.
  • Expand compliance tools. Field investigators will be teamed with subject matter experts from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the Center for Veterinary Medicine to make decisions in real time, working with firms to achieve prompt correction of food safety deficiencies and to help implement the preventive approaches outlined by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). If industry does not quickly and adequately correct critical areas of noncompliance that could ultimately result in food borne outbreaks, we will use our enforcement tools, including those provided under FSMA, as appropriate.
  • Optimize FDA laboratories. ORA and the various Centers will establish a multi-year strategic plan for ORA scientific laboratory work, including hiring and training analysts, purchasing and using equipment, and allocating resources and facilities. At the same time, ORA is committed to conducting an ongoing review of its labs to ensure that they are properly managed and operating as efficiently as possible.
  • Create specialized investigators, compliance officers, and first-line managers. A bioresearch monitoring (BIMO) working group is developing a plan for a dedicated corps of ORA investigators to conduct BIMO inspections, and a dedicated cadre of tobacco investigators is being established.

Working together to implement these action plans will take time, commitment, and continued investment and we’ll need to monitor and evaluate our efforts. These plans will help us implement the new FSMA rules announced in September, as well as the Agency’s new medical product quality initiatives under the FDA Safety and Innovation Act and Drug Quality and Security Act.

FDA’s Program Alignment is a well-thought out approach that responds to the needs of a changing world. I look forward to the ways in which these action plans will ultimately enhance the FDA’s public health and regulatory mission.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

New Data Dashboard Tool Shares FDA’s Inspection, Compliance and Recall Data

By: Douglas Stearn

Douglas StearnAs part of our commitment to transparency FDA is pleased to announce that we have released a new online tool to provide insight into our compliance, inspection, and recall activities.

This new dynamic tool represents a departure from the downloadable spreadsheet-based datasets that we have posted in the past. Instead, the FDA data dashboard presents information in an easy-to-read graphical format. It also provides access to the underlying data allowing anyone interested to see related data and trends.

Our new dashboard provides data for FY 2009 to FY 2013, and allows access to data on:

  • inspections;
  • warning letters;
  • seizures and injunctions;
  • and statistics, specifically for recalls.

We plan to update the data semi-annually.

The dashboard is staged in a cloud environment, and it allows you to:

  • download information for additional analysis;
  • manipulate what you see by selecting filters;
  • rearrange the format of datasets and the way columns are sorted;
  • drill down into data; and
  • export charts and source information for further review.

We developed this new dashboard after President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum on Regulatory Compliance in January 2011.

The President directed federal agencies to make publicly available compliance information easily accessible, downloadable and searchable online, to the extent feasible and permitted by law. FDA formed internal working groups that same year to develop recommendations for enhancing the transparency of our operations and decision-making processes. These working groups identified an online tool as a way to present compliance and enforcement data in a user-friendly manner. The dashboard represents the latest example of our commitment to compiling and posting a wealth of FDA data  for public review and feedback.

FDA works within a global environment and is carrying out more inspections around the world. We collaborate with regulatory authorities across the globe to protect public health. Our data dashboard provides information about inspections in this global environment, and makes this information more readily accessible to the public. Now you can use the dashboard to see this kind of inspection-related information to better understand our regulatory decisions.

A “feedback mechanism” is available so you can send comments, questions or concerns directly to us at FDADataDashboard@fda.hhs.gov.

This rollout effort is part of FDA’s continuing commitment to share inspection, compliance, and recall data. We will continue to update the FDA data dashboard and provide public access to this timely and important information.

Douglas Stearn is Director of the Office of Enforcement and Import Operations within FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs

FDA’s New Roadmap for Progress: Strategic Priorities 2014-2018

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates products that represent about 20 cents of every dollar American consumers spend on products. This includes the safety and effectiveness of drugs, medical devices, and vaccines, the safety of blood supply to food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that emit radiation, and more recently, tobacco. This fact can be easy to gloss over, but if one pauses for a moment to reflect on this fact, it is clear that the FDA’s regulatory role is large and truly meaningful to all of our everyday lives.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.When the FDA was first established, our regulated industries were predominantly local, the volume of imported products was low, and even the movement of goods across country was minimal. But times have changed, and so have the strategies we employ to address those changes. Over the last five years alone, the FDA’s regulatory portfolio has increased to now include regulating tobacco products, developing a new global system for protecting food safety, and addressing challenges created by the global expansion of research, commerce and trade.

In fact, more often than not today, a drug or medical product that ends up on the shelves of an American drugstore or in our hospitals will come, at least in part, from some foreign source. Nearly 40 percent of finished medicines that Americans now take are made elsewhere, as are about 50 percent of all medical devices. Approximately 80 percent of the manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients used in the United States are located outside our borders.

These and other new challenges and transformative developments in global science, technology and trade are rapidly altering the environment in which we work to fulfill our broad public health mission. In order to continue to carry out that mission, we need a set of clearly defined priorities and goals, as well as the strategies for reaching them. Therefore, I am pleased to announce the release of a revised set of FDA Strategic Priorities which will guide the agency in how we continue to promote and protect the health of the American public.

The new Strategic Priorities document sets the path for our Agency over the next four years. It establishes a framework for integrating our five strategic priorities – regulatory science, globalization, safety and quality, smart regulation, and stewardship.

Although each priority is significant in and of itself, the priorities are also interconnected and must not be addressed in isolation. In addition, this new roadmap sets forth FDA’s core mission goals and objectives, such as improving and safeguarding access to the products FDA regulates – and promoting better informed decisions about their use.

The Strategic Plan has been in development for more than a year and was created by a hard-working team of talented and knowledgeable FDA employees representing programs from across the agency. While this team drove the Plan’s creation, it is backed by the commitment of all of us at the FDA. My hope is that these priorities, which will be repeatedly cited in our speeches, policies and writings, will serve as our foundational guidepost, providing the strategic direction to help the agency continue to provide the level of service and protection the American people deserve.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA Works to Mitigate the West Africa Ebola Outbreak

By: Luciana Borio, M.D.

Luciana Borio, M.D.The world is witnessing the devastating effects of the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, the worst Ebola outbreak in recorded history. To date, more than two thousand people in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have become infected, and more than twelve hundred have died. The stories of so many lives lost, and those of so many others fighting for their lives, are heartbreaking and tragic. We at the Food and Drug Administration are dedicated to helping end this outbreak as quickly as possible. And we are working hard to accelerate the development and production of treatments and vaccines to help prevent future outbreaks like this.

The primary approaches to contain the current outbreak remain standard public health measures. However, this outbreak presents complex challenges, in part because there are no FDA-approved treatments or vaccines for the Ebola virus. FDA has an important role during situations like this.

For example, we are working closely with U.S. government agencies that support medical product development – including the National Institutes of Health, the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) – to speed the development and production of medical products that could help mitigate outbreaks like this. And we are working interactively with medical product sponsors to clarify regulatory and data requirements in order to move investigational products forward in development as quickly as possible. We also are in close contact with the World Health Organization and several of our international regulatory counterparts to exchange information about these investigational products for Ebola treatment, and to exchange information about how FDA works to facilitate development of and access to these products.

The experimental vaccines and treatments in development are in the earliest investigational stages and have not been fully tested for safety or efficacy. Only small amounts of some experimental products have been manufactured for testing, which means few courses, if any, are available for companies to make available for compassionate use in response to this outbreak. We are working closely with our U.S. government colleagues to have experimental treatments and vaccines available for clinical evaluation in the next few months. We are hopeful that, in the future, we will have medical products approved and manufactured for wide-scale use to address the Ebola outbreak. However, these products are not at that stage yet.

In the meantime, FDA is doing all we can to alleviate the situation. FDA has one of the world’s most flexible regulatory frameworks, which includes mechanisms to enable access to available investigational medical products when, based on certain criteria such as the balance between expected risk and benefit to the patient, it would be appropriate to use such products.

For example, under certain circumstances, clinicians may request the use of an Emergency Investigational New Drug (EIND) application under the FDA’s Expanded Access program to access investigational products outside of clinical trials for their patients. And under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority, we can allow the use of an unapproved medical product – or an unapproved use of an approved medical product – for a larger population during emergencies, when there are no adequate, approved and available alternatives.

This month, we authorized the use of an Ebola diagnostic test, developed by DoD, under an EUA to detect the Ebola virus in DoD-designated laboratories. This test can help facilitate an effective response to the ongoing outbreak in West Africa by helping to rapidly identify patients infected with Ebola virus and facilitate appropriate containment measures and clinical care.

It is an unfortunate fact that, during outbreaks like this, fraudulent products that claim to prevent, treat or cure a disease rapidly appear on the market. FDA has learned of several fraudulent products that claim to prevent or treat this Ebola virus infection, including so-called natural remedies. Consumers who have seen these fraudulent products or false claims should report them to us. For our part, we will remain vigilant for fraudulent products and false product claims related to the Ebola virus, and will take enforcement actions as warranted to protect public health.

FDA stands ready to work with companies and healthcare providers to speed product development and to facilitate access to investigational products to treat patients when appropriate. We are fully committed to helping end this outbreak as quickly as possible and to sustaining our efforts to help prevent such outbreaks in the future.

Luciana Borio, M.D., is the Assistant Commissioner for Counterterrorism Policy and Acting Deputy Chief Scientist.

FDA Researchers Build Partnerships to Advance Innovations

By: David G. White, Ph.D.

Last week, FDA scientists and researchers presented more than 160 abstracts at the 4th Annual Food and Drug Administration Foods and Veterinary Medicine Science and Research Conference:  that’s more than 160 research projects focused on protecting the health of people and animals. The presentations and posters at the conference were shared among approximately 300 FDA researchers and other staff members who came to hear the latest on our science and research accomplishments.

David White and Heather Tate discuss poster

Heather Tate, author of “NARMS investigation of an increase in Salmonella serotype IIIa 18:z4,z23:- isolated from retail meats and humans,” discussing her poster with David G. White, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer and Research Director, FDA Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine, at the 4th Annual FDA Foods and Veterinary Medicine Science and Research Conference. See more photos of this event on Flickr.

FDA research in the food and veterinary medicine arena covers many different fields of study, from foodborne pathogens to nanotechnology, food allergens, dietary supplements and much more. For example, research is being conducted to improve detection methods for numerous microbial pathogens and chemical hazards that may contaminate the foods you and your pets eat. The diverse research portfolio of this conference showcased all the advancements in science and technology that the FDA is investing in to protect the health of people and animals.

The research presented was the highlight of the conference, but we are making equally important advancements as an organization. We have come very far in terms of our communication and collaboration among foods, cosmetics, and animal health researchers across different components of the FDA. There are so many parts of FDA involved in these areas of research that our top priority is to be sure we are working together and using our resources strategically. We must make sure our projects are more than just interesting – they must be focused on our highest public health priorities.

One of the major themes of the conference was that partnerships are critical to fostering innovation. This was emphasized by Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine Mike Taylor, who noted in his opening remarks the terrific effort of everyone who worked on the Whole Genome Sequencing project – a major undertaking that was recently a finalist and a Secretary’s Pick for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Innovates award.

FDA Science and Research Conference

Tammy Barnaba, author of “Surveillance of Probiotic Ingredients in Dietary Supplements and Microbial Variations Between Product Lots,” explaining data from her poster to Laurenda Carter, another attendee, at the 4th Annual FDA Foods and Veterinary Medicine Science and Research Conference. See more photos of this event on Flickr.

This project was launched to showcase the capacity of this technology to revolutionize foodborne disease tracking, and it was a true collaboration among many laboratories within FDA (Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and Office of Regulatory Affairs), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS).

One of the goals of our Whole Genome Sequencing initiative is to further develop and roll out a pathogen detection network called the GenomeTrakr, which would store genomic data of common foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella and Listeria. This data would enable FDA scientists to determine the exact order of the molecules in an organism’s genetic material, information which can then be used to identify specific strains of bacteria or viruses in foods that are causing illness. Once the strains are identified, scientists from FDA, CDC, USDA and the various states can quickly and efficiently trace the strain back to the origin of contamination so that we can improve the safety of our food supply and protect people from becoming ill.

As Dr. Eric Brown, the director of FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) Division of Microbiology in the Office of Regulatory Science, explains: “What genome sequencing allows us to do with food traceback is unprecedented. It’s like upgrading from an old backyard telescope to the Hubble.”

The projects presented at this year’s conference highlight the progress we have made, and the progress we want to continue to make, to expand our partnerships beyond FDA and our sister agencies, such as CDC and USDA, into academia and the private sector.

It’s exciting to see the headway we are making and the commitment of our researchers to protect and promote the health of humans and animals.

David G. White, Ph.D., is Chief Science Officer and Research Director, FDA Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine

See more photos of this event on Flickr.

A Milestone in our Partnership with Mexico on Food Safety

En Español

By: Michael R. Taylor

We know that food safety is more a journey than a destination, but there are times when we can point to a major milestone along the road. Today, we reached such a milestone in our long-standing relationship with Mexico by signing a statement of intent to establish a new produce safety partnership.

signing ceremony in Mexico

Left to right: Michael R. Taylor, FDA Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine; Enrique Sánchez Cruz, Executive Director, SENASICA, Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Mikel Arriola Peñalosa, Commissioner, COFEPRIS – at today’s signing ceremony.

Working with Mexico on food safety is a top priority. Mexico is one of the United States’ top trading partners, and much of the produce we eat is grown there, including produce that otherwise would be hard to find during the winter. And food safety modernization efforts are underway in both countries, providing an excellent opportunity for progress. In the U.S., we are implementing the Food Safety Modernization Act, and produce safety is a big part of that effort, while Mexico is implementing an amendment to its food safety laws that mandates standards for fresh produce, inspections, and surveillance and verification programs.

We have been working with the two food safety agencies in Mexico—SENASICA, the National Service for Agro-Alimentary Public Health, Safety and Quality, and COFEPRIS, the Federal Commission for the Protection from Sanitary Risks—for some time, and it has been a very rewarding relationship. Last fall, I had the pleasure of traveling to Mexico City to meet with Dr. Enrique Sanchez Cruz, director general of SENASICA, and Mikel Arriola, federal commissioner of COFEPRIS, who were both present for today’s signing ceremony. And in March of this year, I traveled to Tubac, Arizona, to meet with Mexican government officials and producers of fresh fruits and vegetables from both sides of the border to discuss how all of us—in both the public and private sectors—can do our part to meet high consumer expectations for food safety.

The statement of intent is just a two-page document, but it represents a strategy that is far-reaching and designed to achieve high rates of compliance with produce standards in each country. In the months and years to come, we will be working with Mexico to identify practices to prevent contamination during the growing, harvesting, packing, holding and transportation of fresh fruits and vegetables and verification measures to ensure these preventive practices are working. We will exchange information to better understand each other’s produce safety systems—and in fact, this sharing is already underway. We intend to develop culturally appropriate education and outreach materials to support industry compliance with produce safety standards, and we will work on enhancing our collaboration on laboratory activities and on outbreak response and traceback activities.  It’s an ambitious agenda, and that is the value of an inclusive partnership. We are engaging industry, commerce, agriculture, academia and consumers because everyone has a role in ensuring the safety of the food supply.

It is gratifying to see the progress we have made along the way—and even more gratifying to know that with the new produce safety partnership in place, fruits and vegetables will be safer for consumers on both sides of the border.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine