On the road from Mexico: a model for regulatory cooperation

En Español

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg

FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., meeting with Mexican public health and regulatory officials in Mexico City this week

This week I’m making my first visit to Mexico as FDA Commissioner and, while I am savoring the rich culture, warm people and delicious food, the trip is providing me with a vital first-hand perspective of the long-standing, productive and collaborative working relationship FDA maintains with our regulatory counterparts in this wonderful country. I’ve blogged many times about the importance of adapting to our rapidly changing world—one in which the medical products we use and the foods we eat are increasingly produced in countries other than our own. Perhaps nowhere is that dynamic more vivid than with our neighbors to the South. And nowhere provides a more profound example of how cooperation is essential to protect public health and realize the benefits of a vibrant trade relationship.

Today, Mexico is a major player in the global marketplace and, of course, one of the United States’ most important trade partners. In the U.S., nearly one-third of the FDA-regulated food products we eat come from Mexico. On the medical products side, Mexico is the 2nd leading exporter of medical devices to the U.S.—the vast majority of which are lower risk devices such as surgical drapes, wheelchair components, and non-invasive tubing.

The foundation of successful cooperation is forging real relationships with our regulatory counterparts and our key stakeholders including the industries we regulate. FDA’s office in Mexico City—one of three in the Latin America region—has been a critical source of support for many of our collaborative activities since we opened its doors some four years ago. And this week my colleagues and I have had the opportunity to have fruitful meetings with the leaders of the Mexican Ministry of Health and the two regulatory agencies with whom work so closely: COFEPRIS (the Federal Commission for the Protection from Sanitary Risks) and SENASICA (the National Service for Agroalimentary Public Health, Safety and Quality).

We’ve discussed our respective strategies to address our nations’ most critical public health issues like obesity and nutrition, and the important ways in which we share information and align our regulatory approaches. For example, our partners in Mexico have such confidence in FDA’s premarket review system of medical products that COFEPRIS issues agreements with companies — agreements that recognize FDA approvals and grant drug and device companies “fast track” pathway to make their products available to patients dramatically more quickly.

Margaret Hamburg and Mike Taylor at mushroom farm

FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. (foreground), and Michael R. Taylor, Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine (left), visit a mushroom farm in Mexico

We also held two interactive roundtable discussions with members of the medical products and food industries in which we had lively exchanges about key issues such as how quality manufacturing is not only good for public health, but good for business. And yesterday I got a close up view on that critical concept with a visit to the Monteblanco facility of Hongos de Mexico, S.A. de C.V., one of Mexico’s largest producer of mushrooms – located in the Toluca valley just a 90 minute drive from downtown Mexico City. Hongos de Mexico is a company that FDA has routinely visited and inspected given Monteblanco produces a staggering 60,000 pounds of mushrooms each day for consumption within Mexico and export to the U.S. and other countries. In addition to being an enlightening education on the process of growing and packing mushrooms, our visit to the Monteblanco facility was a living example of the critical role the private sector plays to ensure the safety of products for consumers in the U.S. and around the world.

Today is the final day of our jam-packed visit to Mexico and I’m thrilled that we will be signing a Produce Safety Partnership Statement of Intent, which is just the latest example of the successful collaboration to reduce the increased risk of foodborne illnesses that naturally comes with a more globalized market. The partnership will support our work to implement preventive practices and verification measures to ensure the safety of fresh and minimally produced fruits and vegetables.

At the end of the day, our trip to Mexico has shined a bright light on how important it is to continue to explore new ways to fulfill the mission that we share with our regulators around the world—to protect and promote public health. Our partnership with Mexico serves as a model not only as it relates to improving the health and well-being of consumers but also to promote innovation and economic growth.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

OpenFDA Provides Ready Access to Recall Data

By: Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S.

Every year, hundreds of human and animal foods, drugs, and medical devices are recalled from the market by manufacturers. These products may be labeled incorrectly or might pose health or safety issues. Most recalls are voluntary; in some cases they may be ordered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Recalls are reported to the FDA, and compiled into its Recall Enterprise System, or RES. Every week, the FDA releases an enforcement report that catalogues these recalls. And now, for the first time, there is an Application Programming Interface (API) that offers developers and researchers direct access to all of the drug, device, and food enforcement reports, dating back to 2004.

Taha Kass-HoutThe recalls in this dataset provide an illuminating window into both the safety of individual products and the safety of the marketplace at large. Recent reports have included such recalls as certain food products (for not containing the vitamins listed on the label), a soba noodle salad (for containing unlisted soy ingredients), and a pain reliever  (for not following laboratory testing requirements).

At present, FDA provides various ways to access the recalls data, including an RSS feed, a Flickr stream, and a search interface. This new API supplements these sources as the first, and one-call, access to the entire enforcements archive. The hope is that this API will be useful to developers and researchers interested in FDA enforcement actions. Developers can now call into the API to add recalls data to mobile apps or consumer websites. And researchers could use the API to study individual manufacturers, product categories, or specific foods or drugs.

The recalls database is the second dataset to be released on openFDA. Since openFDA debuted on June 2, 2014, the website has generated considerable interest. In the past five weeks, the site has had 34,000 sessions (two-thirds are new sessions) from 26,000 unique visitors worldwide that generated 80,000 page views.

The adverse events API has been accessed by 18,000 Internet connected devices, with nearly 2.4 million API calls since the launch.  At least one new website, http://www.researchae.com, has been created to allow any user to submit queries on the adverse events data, and several other companies are integrating the data into their products and services. It is also being accessed by researchers inside and outside FDA and by journalists as well.

More APIs will follow in the weeks ahead. OpenFDA is taking an agile (development in small chunks of iterations) approach in the creation and release of these APIs, with the objective of getting feedback from developers and researchers (as well as from industry and the public) at the GitHub and StackExchange forums that serve our project. We plan to incorporate some of the feedback into future iterations of the API. Accordingly, as we learn more about how the public might seek to use this data — and as a result of our agile and user-centered methodologies — the API structure may change in quite a bit in the coming months. It’s also important to note that this API, like all others on openFDA, are in beta and are not ready for clinical use. However, their contribution to FDA’s public health mission already now grows every day.

Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S., is FDA Chief Health Informatics Officer and Director of FDA Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation

FDA Leverages Big Data Via Cloud Computing

By: Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S.

Last year, I worked with a group of colleagues throughout the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on a project that is critical for the agency’s future: the modernization of our information technology platforms to prepare for the influx of “Big Data”—the enormous data sets we receive daily from manufacturers, health care providers, regulatory bodies, scientists and others.

Taha Kass-HoutThese data sets are not only larger than ever before, they are also arriving more frequently than ever and varying enormously in format, and quality.

This year alone, we expect to receive somewhere between 1.5 and 2 million submissions through our eSubmission Gateway – and some submissions can now be as large as a Terabyte (one trillion bytes) in size. This is the very definition of a big data.

But, at FDA, we view it as an opportunity and a challenge. To meet both, we are building an innovative technology environment that can handle vast amounts of data and provide powerful tools to identify and extract the information we need to collect, store and analyze.

A key example is our recent leveraging of cloud computing.

“Cloud computing” is, basically, computing on demand. Think of how you use water, or electricity, at the same time as do your neighbors and millions of others. You pay only for what you use, and service is always guaranteed. You don’t need to wait till your neighbor is done to use the washer or dryer because there is only enough electrical capacity to handle one person at a time.

The same is true of cloud computing, which stores data on the Internet, rather than on the hard drive or drives of computers. In essence, it gives us the ongoing, simultaneous capacity to collect, control and analyze enormous data sets.

For example, FDA, partnering with state and local health organizations, identifies thousands of foodborne pathogen contaminants every year. We sequence, store and analyze this data to understand, locate, and contain life-threatening outbreaks. Again, cloud computing aids us in this effort.

Finally, FDA has some of the world’s most valuable data stores about human health and medicine. Through OpenFDA, our newest IT program, we are making some of these existing publicly available data sets more easily accessible to the public and to our regulatory stakeholders in a structured, computer readable format that will make it possible for technology specialists, such as mobile application creators, web developers, data visualization artists and researchers to quickly search, query, or pull massive amounts of public information instantaneously and directly from FDA datasets on an as needed basis. OpenFDA is beginning with an initial pilot program involving the millions of reports of drug adverse events and medication errors that have been submitted to the FDA from 2004 to 2013 and will later be expanded to include the agency’s databases on product recalls and product labeling.

OpenFDA promotes data sharing, data access, and transparency in our regulatory and safety processes, and spurs innovative ideas for mining the data and promoting the public health.

Big data is important to the way we carry out regulatory science, which is the science of developing new tools and approaches to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of FDA-regulated products. Through innovative methods such as cloud computing, we are taking advantage of this flood tide of new information to continue to protect and promote the public health.

Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S., is FDA’s Chief Health Informatics Officer and Director of FDA’s Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation.

Why We Want Pregnant Women and Children to Eat More Fish

By: Stephen Ostroff, M.D.

Ten years ago, the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency advised pregnant and breastfeeding women, and women who might become pregnant, to limit their consumption of fish to no more than 12 ounces a week to protect the fetus and their children from mercury, which is present to some degree in all fish.

Stephen OstroffIt appears many women may have taken that advice too far. FDA’s analysis of the reported seafood consumption of more than 1,000 pregnant women in the United States found that over 20 percent of them had eaten no fish at all in the previous month. Of the women who reported eating fish, 50 percent ate less than two ounces a week, and 75 percent ate less than four ounces per week.

That’s a real problem because we now know that that there’s a beneficial link between eating fish during pregnancy and children’s growth and development. Scientific studies indicate that the best way for pregnant and breastfeeding women to reap those health benefits for their children while minimizing risk from mercury is by eating at least eight to 12 ounces per week of a variety of fish lower in mercury. That is the level that we are now recommending.

What fish are lower in mercury? The answer is most fish in the grocery store. For example, nine of the most-commonly eaten fish in the U.S. are toward the low end: shrimp, pollock, salmon, canned light tuna, tilapia, catfish, cod, flatfish and haddock. So there should be little difficulty in selecting fish to meet the optimal weekly amount of fish consumption.

The four fish that FDA and EPA continue to recommend that women in the target group and young children avoid because they are the highest in mercury are: tilefish from the Gulf of Mexico, shark, swordfish and king mackerel. These four types of fish are not commonly eaten in the United States and represent less than two percent of the market share here.

We are also continuing to recommend that women in the target group eat no more than six ounces per week of albacore tuna. This advice should not adversely affect most women’s current consumption patterns because six ounces a week is nearly three times the amount that most women are now eating of any type of fish in a typical week.

We want to hear from you about this draft advice. The draft is now open for comments. We also plan to take the draft updated advice to FDA’s Advisory Committee on Risk Communication, which will hold a public meeting on it in the near the future.

And separately, we have received a citizen petition requesting, in part, that FDA require that its recommendations about seafood consumption be posted where seafood is sold. This petition is currently under consideration by FDA.

Finally, I want to emphasize that pregnant or breastfeeding women should continue to consume a well-balanced diet to help ensure the health of their children. No matter what the food, our priority is making sure you know the benefits and the risks so that you can make the best choice for yourself and your family.

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., is FDA’s Acting Chief Scientist

FDA and Texas Join Forces in Immediate Response to Oil Spill

By: Dennis Baker

There’s never a good outcome after ships collide. But after a March 22, 2014 accident in which a barge and a ship collided in the Houston Ship Channel, a collaborative, flexible response led by FDA and its state partners prevented a catastrophe. Spilled into the waterway were 167,800 gallons of bunker fuel, a waste product from traditional fuel oil processing that is a cross between a solid and a liquid. What followed the collision was an immediate and coordinated federal-state response, underscoring the collaborative flexibility of FDA.

Dennis BakerFDA’s Dallas District Office, Office of Emergency Operations, and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) began working together within 24 hours of the spill. Trained personnel from FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs’ Southwest Region and Dallas District were communicating daily with state public health officials and investigating the risks to public health. A Southwest Region shellfish specialist, Chris Brooks, was part of a team monitoring reports from DSHS’ Seafood Safety Group regarding the condition of Galveston Bay, into which the channel flows to the south.

As a result of such close and early collaboration following the spill, the DSHS and the Dallas District Office jointly activated the Texas Rapid Response Team (RRT) on March 27 for information and coordination purposes, and Incident Commanders were appointed. Then, a very quick response unfolded.

  • More than 70 seafood firms were identified by DSHS—with the list growing to 103 firms—and visits were scheduled to ensure their products were not contaminated.
  • A state-wide consumer alert was broadcast to inform the public about the spill and dockside deliveries of seafood were monitored throughout the area.
  • A massive oil recovery operation swung into place as the oil slick moved southward toward Matagorda Bay. Much of the bunker fuel spilled was ultimately captured by spill containment equipment.
  • The state issued a public consumption advisory recommending that people not eat fish, crabs or shrimp from the Galveston and Matagorda bays.
  • The DSHS contacted licensed seafood firms from Beaumont to Corpus Christi, an expanse of some 300 miles, and advised them to review their HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) plan provisions for chemical contaminants. The firms were also encouraged to strengthen their dockside receipt procedures that include visual and organoleptic (taste, color, odor and feel) exams prior to accepting seafood.

This is but a snapshot of the mechanics of a successful federal-state collaborative effort, an immediate response to protect public health.

Learn more about FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs.

Dennis Baker is FDA’s Regional Food and Drug Director, Office of Regulatory Affairs

OpenFDA: Innovative Initiative Opens Door to Wealth of FDA’s Publicly Available Data

By: Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S.

Today, I am pleased to announce the launch of openFDA, a new initiative from our Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation (OITI). OpenFDA is specifically designed to make it easier for web developers, researchers, and the public to access and use the many large, important, health data sets collected by the agency.

Taha Kass-HoutThese publicly available data sets, once successfully integrated and analyzed, can provide knowledge and insights that cannot be gained from any other single source.

Consider the 3 million plus reports of drug adverse reactions or medication errors submitted to FAERS, the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (previously AERS), since 2004.

Researchers, scientists, software developers, and other technically-focused individuals in both the private and public sectors have always been invited to mine that publicly available data set – and others – to educate consumers, which in turn can further our regulatory or scientific missions, and ultimately, save lives.

But obtaining this information hasn’t always been easy.

In the past, these vast datasets could be difficult for industry to access and to use.  Pharmaceutical companies, for example, send hundreds of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to FDA every year because that has been one of the ways they could get this data. Other methods called for downloading large amounts of files encoded in a variety of formats or not fully documented, or using a website to point-and-click and browse through a database – all slow and labor-intensive processes.

openFDA logoOpenFDA will make our publicly available data accessible in a structured, computer-readable format. It provides a “search-based” Application Programming Interface – the set of requirements that govern how one software application can talk to another – that makes it possible to find both structured and unstructured content online.

Software developers can now build their own applications (such as a mobile phone app or an interactive website) that can quickly search, query or pull massive amounts of public information instantaneously and directly from FDA datasets in real time on an “as-needed” basis. Additionally, with this approach, applications can be built on one common platform that is free and open to use. Publicly available data provided through openFDA are in the public domain with a CC0 Public Domain Dedication.

Drug adverse events is the first dataset – with reports submitted from 2004 through 2013 available now.

Using this data, a mobile developer could create a search app for a smart phone, for example, which a consumer could then use to determine whether anyone else has experienced the same adverse event they did after taking a certain drug.

As we focus on making existing public data more easily accessible, and providing appropriate documentation and examples to developers, it’s important to note that we will not release any data that could be used to identify individuals or reveal other private information.

OpenFDA uses cutting-edge technologies deployed on FDA’s new Public Cloud Computing infrastructure enabled by OITI, and will serve as a pilot for how FDA can interact internally and with external stakeholders, spur innovation, and develop or use novel applications securely and efficiently. As we move forward with the early stages of openFDA, we will be listening closely to the public, researchers, industry and all other users for their feedback on how to make openFDA even more useful in promoting and protecting the public health.

Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S., is FDA’s Chief Health Informatics Officer and Director of FDA’s Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation.

FDA and Health Professionals, Safeguarding the Public’s Health

By: Anna M. Fine, Pharm.D.

At our recent third annual Health Professional Organizations Conference, some of FDA’s most senior leaders exchanged views and discussed issues of mutual interest with senior representatives from key health professional organizations.

Anna FineHeld on FDA’s White Oak campus in Silver Spring, Md., and organized by the FDA’s Office of Health & Constituent Affairs (OHCA), the event was attended by 30 professional organizations representing physicians, nurses, physician assistants, dentists, optometrists, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and others.

An open and ongoing dialogue between these professionals and FDA is a vital part of addressing many important public health issues. In her opening remarks, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg offered a few examples, such as health professionals’ contributions to the FDA’s MedWatch and Adverse Event Reporting programs and their work in interpreting and addressing medical products’ safety signals. A drug’s safety profile is continually evaluated after FDA approval, and health professionals are encouraged to report suspected adverse events to FDA which allows FDA to conduct comprehensive safety evaluations. Dr. Hamburg also emphasized the importance of health professionals’ engagement in regulatory science research, which provides essential support for the agency’s decisions and ability to bring innovative products to market.

Mitch Zeller, the Director of FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, speaking at the third annual Health Professional Organizations Conference, on May 14, 2014

Mitch Zeller, Director of FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, speaking at the agency’s third annual Health Professional Organizations Conference. See more photos of this event on Flickr.

Key FDA leaders who gave presentations throughout the day included Mitch Zeller, the Director of FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products; Dr. Stephen Ostroff, Acting Chief FDA Scientist; and Dr. Peter Lurie, Acting Associate Commissioner of FDA’s Office of Planning and Policy.

In addition, senior scientists from FDA’s centers for drugs, medical devices and food discussed FDA’s priorities and answered questions from the audience. The robust dialogue between the panel members and our stakeholders covered many public health issues including youth and tobacco and FDA’s proposed changes to the food label.

Feedback from the audience highlights the need for such a conference.

“It’s great to have this dialogue with FDA officials. It demonstrates that they respect our organizations and want our feedback,” said one stakeholder representative.

“I love coming to these annual meetings, not only to meet FDA personnel but to talk with colleagues in other professions. This is a one-of-a-kind forum,” said another.

As a pharmacist and team leader within OHCA, I can attest to the fact that my FDA colleagues and I benefited as well. We learned a lot about our stakeholders’ concerns and established new connections with health professional organizations—contacts that we plan to follow-up on to explore new opportunities for mutual cooperation and collaboration in the interest of the public health.

Anna M. Fine, Pharm.D., is Director of the Health Professional Liaison Program in FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs.

For National Women’s Health Week, FDA Resources Help Women Make Informed Health Choices

By: Marsha B. Henderson, M.C.R.P.

“Ask your mother.” In households throughout the country, women often make decisions about foods and medical products for themselves and their loved ones.

8547850411_6e188c4b11_o-1As we celebrate National Women’s Health Week (May 11-17), I want to highlight some of the many ways in which FDA is working to make sure that women have the resources they need to make informed health choices.

FDA’s Office of Women’s Health (OWH) offers educational resources to help women at every stage of their adult lives—covering topics that range from college health to healthy aging. We develop and disseminate easy-to-read health materials and educational videos for women. We also connect women to these resources and other safety information on the FDA’s For Women website.

Throughout this week, OWH will be conducting special health promotions to connect women to resources on how to stay healthy. Starting today, women can order a free kit of OWH health materials on topics including mammograms, sleep problems, pregnancy, and contact-lens care. OWH is also collaborating with FDA’s Office of Communications to share tips for new mothers and other resources.

Lastly, we’re using social media to challenge women to take better care of their health. Encourage the women in your networks to follow us on Pinterest for a special challenge and health tips each day of the week. Use #1wk4health to participate.  In addition, follow @fdawomen and join us on May 13 at 1 pm for a Twitter chat we are co-hosting with the National Institute of Health’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Office of Research on Women’s Health; the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Minority Health; and Everyday Health.

Once the week is over, I hope you will continue to look to FDA for women’s health resources. Encourage the women in your community to read our health materials, watch a video or participate in one of our social media activities.

Marsha B. Henderson, M.C.R.P., is FDA’s Assistant Commissioner for Women’s Health

Building Expertise and Crossing Boundaries to Improve Oversight

By: Howard Sklamberg, J.D.

To keep the food supply safe, have safe, effective, and high quality medical products, and decrease the harms of tobacco product use, we have to work with the rest of the world.

Howard SklambergAs FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy (GO), I oversee FDA’s efforts to further advance its thinking and strategies from a primarily domestic to a globally focused regulator.

GO coordinates the efforts of FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) and the Office of International Programs (OIP), and works with all of FDA’s product centers on scientific, manufacturing or other regulatory challenges. The highly skilled and dedicated workforce in ORA and OIP is responsible for conducting domestic and foreign inspections, deepening collaborations with local, state and foreign regulatory partners, helping these regulatory partners to strengthen their regulatory systems, and fostering the use of science-based standards and regulatory coherence around the globe to promote the public health of our citizens.

We have to be able to share information with our regulatory partners. We need their help to implement new regulations that have worldwide impact on the oversight of food under the Food Safety Modernization Act and medical products under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act. Working together with these partners, we can ensure an effective public health safety net for our citizens and communities.

An important new priority for FDA is to make fundamental changes in the way we operate in today’s world by aligning our efforts across the agency to keep pace with the acceleration of scientific innovation and the global expansion of the markets. So much of FDA’s work cuts across multiple product areas. How do we make that work as a large and complex agency?

Commissioner Hamburg and senior leaders across the Agency are committed to strengthening our ability to do just that and are collaborating to achieve greater operational and program alignment across the Centers and ORA.

A key part of this process is to enhance specialization across FDA. For ORA, enhanced specialization means that investigators, compliance officers, import reviewers, laboratory personnel, managers and others will have increased technical expertise in a specific commodity area and will work closely with subject matter experts in FDA’s centers. Over time, ORA’s geographic-based model will evolve to a commodity-specific, program-based model that will provide ORA staff the opportunity to gain increased expertise in specific product areas, such as pharmaceuticals, food, animal feed, medical devices, biologics, and tobacco. They will work as part of a team with the staff from other centers, collaborating, for example, with the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research on pharmaceutical oversight or with the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition on food safety issues.

It is especially important that experts in the centers and ORA be engaged in helping to develop compliance policies and priorities. Working with the centers on these broader concerns puts ORA investigators and compliance officers in a better position to implement the preventive approaches contained in new statutes and work together more seamlessly with the centers.

These and other changes that are part of the agency’s focus on program alignment will deepen our knowledge and make us more effective and efficient, with more clarity and coherence in our communications and actions.

This process is still in its early stages. There is a lot of planning still to be done, and we will work to ensure a transparent and inclusive process. Nevertheless, change is coming and I am excited and proud to be part of a transformation that can only strengthen our efforts to safeguard the foods and medical products that are so important in the lives of people all over the world.

Howard Sklamberg, J.D., is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

FDA Operations Team Prepares to Implement Food Safety Laws

By: Roberta Wagner and Joann Givens

Since President Barack Obama signed the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) into law—giving FDA new power to oversee food safety using controls that prevent, rather than react, to hazards—we have been developing an operational strategy to help prevent unsafe foods from ever being distributed.

Roberta Wagner

Roberta Wagner, Co-Chair of FDA’s FSMA Operations Team Steering Committee and Deputy Director for Regulatory Affairs at FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Nutrition.

FDA has proposed seven FSMA-mandated rules that, when final, will establish the comprehensive framework of modern, prevention-oriented standards mandated by FSMA, covering the production and transportation of human and animal foods, whether produced in the U.S. or overseas.

As co-chairs of the FSMA operations team, our job is to facilitate implementation of the food law. And we’re not waiting until the proposed rules are finalized to build the infrastructure that will be needed to support their requirements. Foodborne disease currently affects 1 in 6 Americans each year, and we can’t waste any time.

Many of FSMA’s proposed rules intersect and cover an incredibly diverse spectrum of people and companies located all over the world. Our strategy must be workable for all while protecting our food safety goals. Our team is talking to those most affected by the proposed rules—including farmers, importers, industry representatives, and state officials—for their feedback on the most reasonable and practical ways to carry out our preventive and enforcement activities.

We’re thinking about how we can encourage industry compliance with the new rules, and how we can measure this compliance. For example, we’re considering the role of information technology (IT) and how it can be used in reporting activities that will eventually measure compliance with the law.

Joann Givens

Joann Givens, Co-Chair of FDA’s FSMA Operations Team Steering Committee and Acting Regional Food and Drug Director (Central Region) in the Office of Regulatory Affairs.

Our operations team has created three workgroups tasked with implementing a multiyear strategy for compliance. Each group includes at least one state government representative. They focus on:

  • Preventive controls, considering issues such as the need to develop a trained workforce that can complete consistent, high quality inspections.
  • Produce safety and the development of performance measures.
  • Import controls and the need for goals and timelines for each phase of the two proposed rules designed to strengthen FDA oversight of foods imported into the U.S.

As co-chairs, we meet routinely with these workgroups and stay current on their progress and recommendations. We share what we learn from workgroup brainstorming sessions with Michael R. Taylor, FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine, and work with him to fine-tune operational strategies. And we meet with other federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), to see what lessons can be learned from their operations.

The final timing of FSMA depends on when the rules are set, and when industry compliance dates are determined. But we’re getting the people and systems we’ll need in place now so that we’re ready to act when rules go into effect.

Our ultimate public health goal is a safer food supply and a reduction in food-related illnesses. As the proposed rules move through this period in which the public provides input, we hope that all stakeholders will continue to submit comments. Please engage with us and stay tuned for updates.

Roberta Wagner is Co-Chair of FDA’s FSMA Operations Team Steering Committee and Deputy Director for Regulatory Affairs at FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Nutrition.

Joann Givens is Co-Chair of FDA’s FSMA Operations Team Steering Committee and Acting Regional Food and Drug Director (Central Region) in the Office of Regulatory Affairs.