Providing Consumers More Information with Menu and Vending Labeling

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Increasingly, Americans are paying more attention to the foods we eat – the kinds, the quantities, the sources, and the individual ingredients that go into our meals. We know that when we have more information about the nutritional content of our food, we have the opportunity to make more informed choices.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Increased awareness about the choices we make certainly does not mean that we always eat what is healthy. But whether we choose to eat french fries or a tuna sandwich, those selections should reflect informed decision-making. That can only happen if the right information is available to make those choices. That’s why the two new rules FDA issued today on menu and vending machine labeling are so valuable for consumers.

Some states, localities and big restaurant chains are already doing their own forms of menu labeling. The new rules will require calorie information to be listed in a consistent, direct and accessible manner on menus in chain restaurants and similar retail food establishments, and on vending machines. Under the menu labeling rule, certain additional nutrition information will need to be available in writing when customers ask for it.

This is especially important, because about one third of the calories Americans eat and drink come from foods and beverages consumed away from home. In addition, research shows that when we eat out we often consume less nutritious foods and underestimate the number of calories we are taking in.

People can clearly benefit by knowing more, and the new FDA rules will help to do just that. They are not requirements about what people should eat or what restaurants should serve, but rather they will place more information in the customer’s hands so that they can make more informed choices for themselves and their families.

After considering more than 1,100 comments on the proposed versions of these rules, the rules create a consistent approach that will establish a level playing field for larger chain restaurants, while not being overly burdensome on small businesses or individual food establishments. The menu labeling rule applies to restaurants and similar retail food establishments only if they are part of a chain of 20 or more locations and satisfy other criteria.

Few decisions are as critical to our health and our daily lives as those involving the foods we eat. With these new rules on menu and vending machine labeling, Americans can be more certain that those choices are informed ones.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

China Journal: strengthening relationships to protect public health

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

I am just about to wrap up a jam-packed five-day visit to China, a fascinating country with a dramatically growing economy and with an increasingly significant impact on the products that Americans consume. Indeed, a key reason for my trip is the important and growing collaboration between FDA and our counterpart agencies in China to ensure the safety of the large volume of foods and medical products exchanged between our two nations.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Of the 200 countries that export their products to the United States, China ranks first in exports (in dollar value) to our nation. It is the sixth largest provider of food and the sixth largest provider of drugs and biologics. Only the United States has more FDA-registered drug establishments than China. And these numbers are growing. Between 2007 and 2013, China’s annual exports of FDA-regulated products to the U.S. nearly quadrupled, reaching 5.2 million “lines” (portions of a shipment) of imported goods in 2013.

Ensuring the safety and quality of these and other U.S.-destined FDA-regulated goods is a major challenge. To meet it, FDA has transformed itself— from a domestic agency that focused primarily on products manufactured in the U.S. to a truly global agency grappling with the many challenges of globalization.

Among the many efforts in this area, an important component is the FDA’s establishment of permanent outposts staffed by FDA experts in all major exporting regions, including in China. We have 13 FDA staff members currently stationed in the country, primarily in Beijing. Their job is to help ensure that the food and medical products being exported from China meet our standards. FDA’s China Office does this by providing significant support for the Agency’s inspections in China, by strengthening our relationships with Chinese regulators, by working with industry and other stakeholders, by providing important information and technical assistance to all interested parties, and by analyzing trends and events that might affect the safety of FDA-regulated products exported from China to the United States.

Given the volume of U.S. trade with China, we are working to more than triple the number of American staff we place in China. Placing more FDA experts in China will allow FDA to increase significantly the number of inspections it performs in this dynamic, strategic country, as well as to be more effective partners with our colleagues here in China. Such dramatic staffing increases will also allow FDA to enhance its training efforts and technical collaboration with Chinese regulators, industry and others.

This week, we took an important step forward in strengthening our relationship with China when we signed an Implementing Arrangement with the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA). We expect to sign a similar Implementing Arrangement with the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) in the coming weeks. These documents, which build on 2007 agreements with the same two agencies, help to frame the work our inspectors will do in China and create mechanisms for collaboration on inspections.

FDA is also engaging with other stakeholders to create sustainable models for training future champions of regulatory science and quality. Here in China, we helped to create a world-class graduate degree program in international pharmaceutical engineering management (IPEM) at Peking University (PKU), an institution renowned for educating Chinese leaders and thinkers.

This partnership with PKU began in 2005 with just two courses on current good manufacturing practices. These proved hugely successful, and drew attention from Chinese drug companies and regulatory agencies, as well as industry and regulators in neighboring countries. The following year, PKU established a master’s degree program in IPEM, with support from FDA and multinational pharmaceutical companies. The program was formally launched in March 2007, with courses in regulatory science, pharmaceutical science, engineering, and more.

One of the highlights of my trip this week was speaking to more than 200 PKU students, future leaders who will help to accelerate the modernization of this nation’s pharmaceutical industry. I discussed not only FDA’s growing regulatory cooperation with China but the importance of strengthening regulatory science in China to ensure that the highest standards are used to support the development, review, and approval of new medical products, as well as the manufacturing and safety monitoring of medical products. All of this can make an enormous difference in the lives of patients in China, the U.S. and beyond.

Also this week, I met with top Chinese regulatory officials, toured CFDA’s mobile laboratories that test for counterfeit drugs and contaminants in food, and attended the 9th International Summit of Heads of Medicines Regulatory Authorities in Beijing.

Throughout the week, we addressed tough problems that require global solutions. Our discussions ranged from how best to advance biomedical product innovation, expand access to important pharmaceuticals through generic and biosimilar regulatory pathways, and how coordinated action, along with using new, state-of-the art technologies and analytical methods, will more effectively protect the public from substandard or counterfeit products. We are also making tangible progress in strengthening FDA’s partnership with our Chinese counterparts to better oversee the increasingly complex international supply chain and to prevent problems before they occur.

As I prepare for the journey home, I am encouraged by what we accomplished. And all of this bodes well for our ability to promote and protect protect public health in the future.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

View Photos from China:

Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., tours an FDA China Office mobile lab that tests for counterfeit OTC drugs and contaminants in food

Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., meets with Chinese pharmaceutical executives

Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., with students of Peking University

 

FDA and Asia-Pacific Colleagues Focus on Food Safety

By: Camille Brewer, M.S., R.D., and Christopher Hickey, Ph.D.

In the alphabet soup of international affairs— UN, NATO, WTO— APEC is perhaps one of the lesser-known entities. In FDA’s world, APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation), which focuses on facilitating economic growth, cooperation, trade and investment in the Asia-Pacific region, is a significant focus of collaboration in the area of food safety.

Camille Brewer

Camille Brewer, M.S., R.D., Director of International Affairs at FDA’s Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

Food safety is one of the priority areas for APEC, as evidenced by the establishment of the Food Safety Cooperation Forum (FSCF), which has been co-chaired by China and Australia since the forum was formally established in April 2007. FSCF was founded to bring together APEC’s 21 member economies to make the region’s food standards consistent with those of the international food standards body (Codex Alimentarius Commission) – all for the ultimate purpose of improving public health while facilitating trade. (The word “economies,” rather than “nations,” is used to describe APEC members because of their focus on trade and economic issues.)

In September, FDA joined colleagues for APEC food safety meetings in Beijing. Because of the importance of building the capacity for food safety protections in China and the region, China hosted a “Special Session” of FSCF to consider progress from technical working groups on export certificates and maximum residue limits of pesticide in food products. There was also a meeting called the “High-Level Regulator Industry Dialogue” to spotlight numerous cooperative ventures between the private and public sectors. This overview of APEC projects gave us a sense of how well the regions’ economies function together.

Christopher Hickey

Christopher Hickey, Ph.D., FDA’s Country Director for the People’s Republic of China.

While FSCF aims to support dialogue among regulators, many of APEC’s food safety initiatives are built on collaboration with government, industry and academia. At the High-Level Regulator-Industry Dialogue session, the group discussed how working with partners is enhancing food safety by leveraging the benefits of our shared work. FDA talked about how the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) creates new tools to prevent food safety problems, and how FDA’s foreign offices are working with fellow regulators to bolster a coordinated approach.  It was especially heartening to see China present its challenges in the area of food safety as an opportunity to lead development of deeper food safety capacity in the APEC region.

The central role of partnerships was a predominant theme throughout, and when Pam Bailey, CEO and president of the Grocery Manufacturers of America (GMA), addressed participants, she implored delegates to “work together to create conduits for the private sector to interface with governments as they develop newfound safety regimes.”  Bailey highlighted the U.S. notice and comment rule-making process, and noted GMA’s proactive engagement in this process. She emphasized the transparency of the U.S. system, and spoke of GMA’s active engagement to provide constructive feedback on the rules that FDA has proposed to implement FSMA. The importance of transparency in regulatory operations was a message repeated by all representatives from private and public sectors.

Camille Brewer

Camille Brewer, M.S., R.D., at the APEC food safety meetings in Beijing.

There is exceptional collaborative work taking place. The value of these partnerships was evident in technical sessions of the meetings, which covered best practices in laboratory proficiency testing, pilot projects on export certificates in the wine industry, and the convergence of approaches to regulate maximum residue limits for pesticides in wine grapes. It was exciting for us to hear constructive proposals from both developing and developed countries, industry and academia, each with a vital role to play in addressing the challenges of a globalized food safety system. The candid exchange of views is a recipe for success.

Camille Brewer, M.S., R.D., is Director of International Affairs at FDA’s Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

Christopher Hickey, Ph.D., is FDA’s Country Director for the People’s Republic of China.

FDA Invites Students to Sharpen their Research Skills

By: Nysia George, Ph.D., and Tom Powers

NCTR Intern Claire Boyle, a graduate student from Florida State University

NCTR Intern Claire Boyle, is a graduate student from Florida State University. Get this and other NCTR photos on Flickr.

Biology. Chemistry. Bioinformatics. Toxicology.

Practical, hands-on laboratory work is important for all college students who want to become scientists—but, for many of them, such experiences are out of reach.

That’s one of the reasons why every summer, our National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)—FDA’s internationally acclaimed toxicological research center in Jefferson, Arkansas—hosts a special internship program for science students interested in toxicology research.

The 2014 program was exceptionally successful for both the students and the Center.

Applications poured in from more than 200 students pursuing a variety of majors in universities from coast-to-coast. The competition was intense, and the 21 selected students came from schools in 13 states. But they were all alike in two fundamental ways: they were top students, and were eager to hone their scientific skills in real FDA laboratories.

NCTR Intern Luis Valencia, a senior from Texas A&M University

NCTR Intern Luis Valencia, is a senior from Texas A&M University. Get this and other NCTR photos on Flickr.

During their 10 weeks at NCTR, the students worked on projects varying from the development of bioinformatics and statistical methods for RNA sequencing data, to evaluating effects of silver nanoparticles in plastic food containers. They conducted in-vitro experiments; examined effects of nicotine treatment; gained lab experience in cell culture; and were trained in computational modeling or statistical programming.

Each student’s experience was unique and addressed the student’s interests.

The interns gave the program top grades. For example Claire Boyle, a graduate student from Florida State University, said about the lab work: “I like it a lot more than classes. There they tell you that you can do research once you get into the real world. I’ve never had an opportunity to do that before coming here [to NCTR], and that’s the aspect of the program I like best. It’s given me insight into what I want to do for the rest of my life!”

Luis Valencia, a senior from Texas A&M University, echoed similar praise. “This isn’t some pointless classroom assignment; this is the FDA. Something you discover [in this lab] could save a life.” He continued, “I’m having a great experience at NCTR. [My NCTR mentor] let me design my own experiment and helps me a lot. I’m already on my second trial and we’re getting good results.”

The internship program, which was partly funded by the FDA’s Office of Minority Health, is one of the many ways NCTR reaches far and wide to strengthen the scientific foundations of our agency. We engage with scientists within FDA and across other government agencies, industry, and academia to develop scientific information that is vital for sound regulatory policy. We cooperate with colleagues abroad to advance international standardization of regulatory science. And we’re mindful that all quest for knowledge starts with education.

If you are a science student interested in toxicology research, or if you know someone who is, it’s not too early to consider the NCTR’s 2015 internship program. To qualify for admission, a candidate must meet the GPA requirements and provide evidence of success in science courses. He or she will also need letters of recommendation and a personal statement describing his or her research interests.

If you believe you have what it takes, you could be among the select few chosen to join us in the summer of 2015. Applications are accepted throughout the month of February. We look forward to your application!

For more information about the program go to: Summer Student Research Program (NCTR)

For more information about the FDA Office of Minority Health go to: Minority Health

Nysia George, Ph.D., is the National Center for Toxicological Research’s Intern Program Coordinator.

Tom Powers is the National Center for Toxicological Research’s Communication Officer.

Regulatory Science Collaborations Support Emergency Preparedness

By: Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S.

Scientists love a challenge. And coordinating government agencies, healthcare providers, and numerous additional partners to protect public health in emergency situations is definitely a challenge.

Jean Hu-Primmer

Jean Hu-Primmer, Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA’s Medical Countermeasures Initiative (MCMi) is working with federal agencies (through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise), product developers, healthcare professionals, and researchers, among other partners, to help translate cutting-edge science and technology into safe, effective medical countermeasures. Through these collaborations, MCMi supports research to help develop solutions to complex regulatory science challenges.

Data are critical to help FDA evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medical countermeasures—products that can save lives—during public health emergencies. But collecting data in the midst of an emergency is exceptionally challenging. Working with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), FDA is teaming with critical care physicians nationwide to help address these challenges.

Under a contract awarded last month, FDA and BARDA will work with the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group (USCIITG) to gather important information about medical countermeasures used during public health emergencies. Physicians will help address challenges with collecting and sharing data rapidly in emergencies, including streamlining electronic case reporting for clinical trials and rapidly disseminating key findings to FDA and other stakeholders to support clinical decision-making.

During this four-year project, USCIITG will also develop and pre-position a simple influenza treatment protocol in 10 hospitals throughout the U.S. during the 2015-2016 influenza season. The project will help doctors more easily use an investigational treatment protocol for patients with severe influenza, and test the data collection and reporting system during peak times. The goal is to help streamline the process during future influenza seasons and emergencies.

When it is not ethical or feasible to test the effectiveness of products in humans—such as countermeasures for potential bioterror agents—products may be approved under the Animal Rule. When products are approved under the Animal Rule, FDA requires additional studies, called phase 4 clinical trials, to confirm safety and effectiveness. In addition to the MCMi work, BARDA is funding USCIITG to investigate conducting phase 4 clinical studies during public health emergencies. USCIITG partners will train on these protocols, have them reviewed through their Institutional Review Boards (a requirement for all human studies), and create plans for enactment. USCIITG will then conduct an annual exercise to test these plans, a unique approach to broader science preparedness.

MCMi has also recently awarded regulatory science contracts to support other aspects of emergency preparedness, including two projects to investigate decontamination and reuse of respirators in public health emergencies (awarded to Battelle and Applied Research Associates, Inc.), and an award to support appropriate public use of medical countermeasures through effective emergency communication.

Our work involves big challenges. Through regulatory science, and through new and expanding collaborations, we continue to address these challenges to better prepare our nation to use medical countermeasures in emergencies.

Want to help? We’re currently accepting submissions for additional research to support medical countermeasure preparedness. If you have an idea for a new medical countermeasure regulatory science collaboration, we’d love to hear from you.

You can also visit BARDA’s MCM Procurements and Grants page for more information.

Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S., is Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA’s Program Alignment Addresses New Regulatory Challenges

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Over the last year, a group of senior FDA leaders, under my direction, were tasked to develop plans to modify FDA’s functions and processes in order to address new regulatory challenges. Among these challenges are: the increasing breadth and complexity of FDA’s mandate; the impact of globalization on the food and medical product supply chains; and the ongoing trend of rapid scientific innovation and increased biomedical discovery.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The Directorates, Centers and the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) have collaborated closely to define the changes needed to align ourselves more strategically and operationally and meet the greater demands placed on the agency. As a result, each regulatory program has established detailed action plans. Specifically, each plan describes the steps in transitioning to commodity-based and vertically-integrated regulatory programs in the following areas: human and veterinary drugs; biological products; medical devices and radiological health; bioresearch monitoring (BIMO); food and feed; and tobacco.

These action plans focus on what will be accomplished in FY 2015 and outline the need to develop detailed future plans for the next five years in some cases. The plans represent what each Center and ORA have agreed are the critical actions to jointly fulfill FDA’s mission in the key areas of specialization, training, work planning, compliance policy and enforcement strategy, imports, laboratory optimization, and information technology.

Because each Center has a unique regulatory program to manage, there are understandably variations among the plans. However, there are also common features across most of the plans: the need to define specialization across our inspection and compliance functions; to identify competencies in these areas of specialization and develop appropriate training curricula; to develop risk-based work planning that is aligned with program priorities and improves accountability; and to develop clear and current compliance policies and enforcement strategies.

Below are some highlights from the plans that illustrate these features:

  • Establish Senior Executive Program Directors in ORA. In the past, for example, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) would work with several ORA units responsible for the pharmaceutical program. Now, the Centers will have a single Senior Executive in ORA responsible for each commodity program, allowing ORA and the Centers to resolve matters more efficiently.
  • Jointly develop new inspection approaches. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and ORA plan, for example, will begin to focus some inspections on characteristics and features of medical devices most critical to patient safety and device effectiveness. ORA investigators will perform these inspections utilizing jointly developed training.
  • Invest in expanded training across ORA and the Centers. The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and ORA will jointly develop a biologics training curriculum, redesign investigator certification, and cross-train Center and ORA investigators, compliance officers and managers.
  • Expand compliance tools. Field investigators will be teamed with subject matter experts from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the Center for Veterinary Medicine to make decisions in real time, working with firms to achieve prompt correction of food safety deficiencies and to help implement the preventive approaches outlined by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). If industry does not quickly and adequately correct critical areas of noncompliance that could ultimately result in food borne outbreaks, we will use our enforcement tools, including those provided under FSMA, as appropriate.
  • Optimize FDA laboratories. ORA and the various Centers will establish a multi-year strategic plan for ORA scientific laboratory work, including hiring and training analysts, purchasing and using equipment, and allocating resources and facilities. At the same time, ORA is committed to conducting an ongoing review of its labs to ensure that they are properly managed and operating as efficiently as possible.
  • Create specialized investigators, compliance officers, and first-line managers. A bioresearch monitoring (BIMO) working group is developing a plan for a dedicated corps of ORA investigators to conduct BIMO inspections, and a dedicated cadre of tobacco investigators is being established.

Working together to implement these action plans will take time, commitment, and continued investment and we’ll need to monitor and evaluate our efforts. These plans will help us implement the new FSMA rules announced in September, as well as the Agency’s new medical product quality initiatives under the FDA Safety and Innovation Act and Drug Quality and Security Act.

FDA’s Program Alignment is a well-thought out approach that responds to the needs of a changing world. I look forward to the ways in which these action plans will ultimately enhance the FDA’s public health and regulatory mission.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA Invents: How Technology Transfer Gets FDA Inventions from Lab to Marketplace

By: Alice Welch, Ph.D.

If you think the term “government invention” is an oxymoron—well, think again. You may be surprised to learn that many of the breakthrough technologies that shape our lives today are the brainchildren of government researchers—including those at FDA.

Alice WelchTake the Internet and that GPS in your car or on your cell phone. Both technologies were developed by the U.S. Department of Defense —as were the turbine engines that power the wind farms generating some 6% of our nation’s electrical energy. Those long-lasting radial tires on your vehicle? They’re reinforced with a material five times tougher than steel that was developed by a NASA partnership. And you can thank the government for your flu shot and the development of many other life-saving vaccines such as those for hepatitis A and B and HPV.

Government funding is also critical in supporting and accelerating research in academia and industry that leads to game-changing innovations. Technologies like bar code scanners, Internet search-engines, and the touch screens on your tablet and smartphone might not have been possible without the research funding from the National Science Foundation.

Like other government agencies, FDA drives innovation in its own mission-critical work by supporting collaborative research with external partners and by transferring our life-saving inventions to the commercial market. Making all of this happen is a dedicated team of experts from across the agency that forms FDA’s Technology Transfer Program.  Managed from within the Office of the Chief Scientist, the Technology Transfer Program means many things at FDA.

To our researchers, it means they can access unique resources, participate in scientific collaborations, or obtain the technical expertise they need to make their research possible. These resources support and complement the work underway in FDA’s research laboratories. Whether it’s conducting research into how a blood product becomes a commercially produced therapy, or how to improve vaccine manufacturing, or tracking how patients use a product, the research of FDA’s scientists is fundamental to informing FDA’s evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of our regulated products.

To FDA inventors, Technology Transfer means they can get their inventions translated into commercial products that protect and promote public health. A little known fact is that in the course of their research, FDA scientists regularly gain new scientific insights and invent novel technologies or processes. The Technology Transfer team helps move these technologies to the private sector under license agreements so that new products in areas like vaccines, food-pathogen detection systems, counterfeit drug detection, and manufacturing can be created and made available on the market. To give you a sense of what we mean when we say that “FDA drives innovation,” in the last few years alone, our researchers have produced and reported about 20 patentable inventions annually.

And for FDA’s many collaborators, Technology Transfer means they’re able to engage with our researchers to solve scientific problems and create solutions to support FDA’s regulatory mission. To establish these collaborations and get the right resources for FDA researchers, our Technology Transfer team uses special tools or legal agreements, such as Material Transfer Agreements, Confidential Disclosure Agreements, Research Collaboration Agreements, and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements.

Each of these tools is designed to meet the needs of the research project at hand. They enable FDA researchers to obtain materials not available at the agency and to establish successful scientific exchanges with experts in the scientific community—at universities, small businesses, nonprofits or for-profits, or other government agencies.

Technology Transfer’s efforts may not be the stuff of headlines, but they’ve produced huge dividends for public health. They’ve helped guide FDA researchers through negotiating agreements, to establish collaborations, and to ensure that the tools they use to report, transfer and protect the patents of technologies align with legal and policy requirements. Look for my next few blog posts, where I’ll highlight some exciting, high-impact public health contributions based on FDA inventions.

Learn more:

FDA Researchers Build Partnerships to Advance Innovations

Alice Welch, Ph.D, is Director of FDA’s Technology Transfer Program

New Data Dashboard Tool Shares FDA’s Inspection, Compliance and Recall Data

By: Douglas Stearn

Douglas StearnAs part of our commitment to transparency FDA is pleased to announce that we have released a new online tool to provide insight into our compliance, inspection, and recall activities.

This new dynamic tool represents a departure from the downloadable spreadsheet-based datasets that we have posted in the past. Instead, the FDA data dashboard presents information in an easy-to-read graphical format. It also provides access to the underlying data allowing anyone interested to see related data and trends.

Our new dashboard provides data for FY 2009 to FY 2013, and allows access to data on:

  • inspections;
  • warning letters;
  • seizures and injunctions;
  • and statistics, specifically for recalls.

We plan to update the data semi-annually.

The dashboard is staged in a cloud environment, and it allows you to:

  • download information for additional analysis;
  • manipulate what you see by selecting filters;
  • rearrange the format of datasets and the way columns are sorted;
  • drill down into data; and
  • export charts and source information for further review.

We developed this new dashboard after President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum on Regulatory Compliance in January 2011.

The President directed federal agencies to make publicly available compliance information easily accessible, downloadable and searchable online, to the extent feasible and permitted by law. FDA formed internal working groups that same year to develop recommendations for enhancing the transparency of our operations and decision-making processes. These working groups identified an online tool as a way to present compliance and enforcement data in a user-friendly manner. The dashboard represents the latest example of our commitment to compiling and posting a wealth of FDA data  for public review and feedback.

FDA works within a global environment and is carrying out more inspections around the world. We collaborate with regulatory authorities across the globe to protect public health. Our data dashboard provides information about inspections in this global environment, and makes this information more readily accessible to the public. Now you can use the dashboard to see this kind of inspection-related information to better understand our regulatory decisions.

A “feedback mechanism” is available so you can send comments, questions or concerns directly to us at FDADataDashboard@fda.hhs.gov.

This rollout effort is part of FDA’s continuing commitment to share inspection, compliance, and recall data. We will continue to update the FDA data dashboard and provide public access to this timely and important information.

Douglas Stearn is Director of the Office of Enforcement and Import Operations within FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs

FDA’s New Roadmap for Progress: Strategic Priorities 2014-2018

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates products that represent about 20 cents of every dollar American consumers spend on products. This includes the safety and effectiveness of drugs, medical devices, and vaccines, the safety of blood supply to food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that emit radiation, and more recently, tobacco. This fact can be easy to gloss over, but if one pauses for a moment to reflect on this fact, it is clear that the FDA’s regulatory role is large and truly meaningful to all of our everyday lives.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.When the FDA was first established, our regulated industries were predominantly local, the volume of imported products was low, and even the movement of goods across country was minimal. But times have changed, and so have the strategies we employ to address those changes. Over the last five years alone, the FDA’s regulatory portfolio has increased to now include regulating tobacco products, developing a new global system for protecting food safety, and addressing challenges created by the global expansion of research, commerce and trade.

In fact, more often than not today, a drug or medical product that ends up on the shelves of an American drugstore or in our hospitals will come, at least in part, from some foreign source. Nearly 40 percent of finished medicines that Americans now take are made elsewhere, as are about 50 percent of all medical devices. Approximately 80 percent of the manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients used in the United States are located outside our borders.

These and other new challenges and transformative developments in global science, technology and trade are rapidly altering the environment in which we work to fulfill our broad public health mission. In order to continue to carry out that mission, we need a set of clearly defined priorities and goals, as well as the strategies for reaching them. Therefore, I am pleased to announce the release of a revised set of FDA Strategic Priorities which will guide the agency in how we continue to promote and protect the health of the American public.

The new Strategic Priorities document sets the path for our Agency over the next four years. It establishes a framework for integrating our five strategic priorities – regulatory science, globalization, safety and quality, smart regulation, and stewardship.

Although each priority is significant in and of itself, the priorities are also interconnected and must not be addressed in isolation. In addition, this new roadmap sets forth FDA’s core mission goals and objectives, such as improving and safeguarding access to the products FDA regulates – and promoting better informed decisions about their use.

The Strategic Plan has been in development for more than a year and was created by a hard-working team of talented and knowledgeable FDA employees representing programs from across the agency. While this team drove the Plan’s creation, it is backed by the commitment of all of us at the FDA. My hope is that these priorities, which will be repeatedly cited in our speeches, policies and writings, will serve as our foundational guidepost, providing the strategic direction to help the agency continue to provide the level of service and protection the American people deserve.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Reflecting on New Food Protections in the Wake of PCA Convictions

By: Howard Sklamberg and Michael R. Taylor

Last Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, a federal jury in Georgia returned guilty verdicts against two former officials of and one broker for the Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) in connection with practices that led to a 46-state outbreak of Salmonella poisoning in 2009. While there were more than 700 reported cases, including nine deaths, epidemiological projections by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put the total number of illnesses at more than 22,000.

Howard Sklamberg

Howard Sklamberg

The convictions arise from the unlawful sale of Salmonella-tainted peanuts and peanut products. According to the evidence, the trio participated in a scheme to fabricate documents stating that the foods were free of disease-causing bacteria when, in fact, there had either been no testing or the testing had revealed the presence of such bacteria.

We can’t tell you this will never happen again. But we can say that five years after the original actions that led to the PCA convictions, we have stronger protections in place – with more coming soon – that will help prevent foodborne illnesses while empowering us to act swiftly against those who flaunt food-safety regulations.

The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), signed into law in 2011, was passed by Congress with the intent of building a safety net that would provide protections at all points along the global food-supply chain – from farm to table.

FSMA empowers FDA to facilitate the growth of a food-safety culture, working with federal and state agencies, and with farmers, food manufacturers and importers, to bring about widespread compliance with the new regulations mandated by the food safety law.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

Michael R. Taylor

We are still in the midst of rulemaking designed to help keep food safety problems from happening in the first place. We can never prevent all problems and will still have to be vigilant and take action when problems do occur. But having a prevention-based system in place will go a long way to keeping food safe for American consumers. We have proposed seven rules since January 2013 to implement such a system, and last week we issued supplemental proposals to make practical and targeted changes to four of those rules related to the safety of produce, human and animal food products, and imported foods. We are working on implementation strategies well in advance of the 2015 dates on which the rules will be final so we will be ready to put these new requirements in place. We are also working on a plan for outreach and education, so that everyone involved in providing our food – including growers, food processers and importers — will know what the rules require and will have adequate time to plan.

What you may not see in the language of the proposed rules is that FDA is reinventing itself to become as much a coach as a cop. In partnership with state and federal agencies, we will help provide technical assistance and education, and we will provide guidance to help farmers and industry build a framework that protects their products from contamination and, if potential hazards are identified, enables them to act immediately to control them.

That’s not to say that we won’t use tough enforcement tools when necessary, as evidenced by the PCA prosecution. When consumers are at risk, FSMA has given FDA greater authority to take action, in addition to bringing a civil action or seeking criminal prosecution. We can issue mandatory recalls when a company fails to voluntarily recall unsafe food; we can detain products that are potentially in violation of the law to keep them from being moved; and in certain situations we can suspend the registration of a facility to prohibit it from distributing food.

The law gives us these powers. But the vast majority of farmers, manufacturers and importers are committed to providing safe food. FSMA also gives us the power to work with them in partnership to keep foods safer than ever for you and your family.

Howard Sklamberg is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

Read the U.S. Department of Justice press release:

http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/peanut-corporation-america-former-officials-and-broker-convicted-criminal-charges-related