Talking Across International Borders About FSMA

By: Michael R. Taylor

Michael R. TaylorAll countries face the challenges presented by a food supply that is increasingly global, and consumers rightfully expect that the food they eat is safe no matter where it comes from. We all have the same goals: safe food, consumer confidence, and efficient and effective oversight to reach those goals.

With that in mind, our partnerships with foreign food producers and our regulatory counterparts in other countries are increasingly important. As we get closer to releasing the final rules that will implement the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), we are reaching across borders to ensure that our international stakeholders have the information and training they need to meet these new standards.

The need for this international outreach is a message that came through loud and clear at a public meeting this April on FSMA implementation. The feedback from agricultural attaches, overseas business owners, and representatives from governments worldwide was that they want to hear more about what to expect, and how to prepare for what’s ahead.

To address these concerns, we invited representatives of foreign embassies and other international stakeholders to attend a roundtable discussion on June 23, 2015. In the attached video, you’ll see both the optimism and concerns that surfaced during the meeting at FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in College Park, Md.


On June 23, 2015, FDA held a meeting of representatives of foreign embassies and international stakeholders involved in implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). This is the fifth video blog in which the people who will be helping to make FSMA a reality share their insights on challenges, opportunities and next steps. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)


One sentiment, expressed at the meeting, was: “The United States isn’t the only country concerned about food safety.” From FDA’s perspective, we’re counting on that as we build the partnerships we’ll need to help ensure the safety of foods all over the world. We will join forces with agriculture and public health officials in other countries, international industries and associations, multilateral organizations, and academia to address the unique needs of foreign food producers who must comply with the new FSMA regulations.

We’re operating under the premise that the vast majority of food producers, both foreign and domestic, want to ensure the safety of their foods. We will be relying on our international partners to help us find ways to provide solid verification that the FSMA standards are being met.

The earliest compliance dates will be a year after we publish the first final rules this summer. In the meantime, we are working with our public and private partners to develop training for domestic and international food producers. These partners include the U.S. Department of Agriculture, grower and local food system groups, and the Food Safety Preventive Controls and Produce Safety alliances, whose members include the FDA, local and state regulatory agencies, the food industry, and academia.

We are committed to making FSMA implementation as open and transparent a process as possible. The April public meeting and the June roundtable discussion were just two steps in that process. But they were important steps because both provided open and frank conversations.

We’ve got a long road ahead. We’ve long worked with other countries as trading and regulatory partners. Now, we aspire to be food safety partners, working together and supporting each other when problems arise. These partnerships ultimately will benefit consumers all over the world.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

Putting Added Sugars Into Context for Consumers

By: Susan Mayne, Ph.D.

For two decades, consumers have been able to check the Nutrition Facts label to understand not only how much saturated fat, dietary fiber and sodium is in any given food, but how that amount fits in the context of their daily diet. Today, FDA proposes a supplemental rule that would provide consumers with access to that same information for added sugars. This would fill a gap by providing the same valuable content already available to consumers for other nutrients.

Susan MayneIn March 2014, FDA proposed to include the amount of added sugars in grams on the Nutrition Facts label but without the percent Daily Value, and we continue to review comments on this proposed rule. Now, in addition, we are proposing to include on the Nutrition Facts label the percent Daily Value (% DV) for added sugars and are accepting comments on this additional provision.

Why propose providing this additional information to consumers? Scientific data shows that it is difficult to meet nutrient needs while staying within calorie requirements if you consume more than 10 percent of your total daily calories from added sugar. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC), whose recommendations inform the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the foundation for national nutrition programs, standards and education, used the same data in the analysis for their recommendations earlier this year.

FDA considered the evidence and determined that it supports setting a Daily Value for added sugars. The Daily Value, which is used to calculate the percent Daily Value that consumers see on the Nutrition Facts label, would be 50 grams of added sugars for adults and children 4 years of age and older and 25 grams for children 1 through 3 years.

FDA’s initial proposal to include the amount of added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label is now further supported by newly reviewed studies suggesting healthy dietary patterns, including lower amounts of sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, are strongly associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Consumers can still choose foods that have added sugars as part of a healthy diet, but the proposed Daily Value would provide a benchmark for intake. Without information like this about a nutrient, it’s hard to know if you’re eating too much or too little in a given day. For example, a consumer who drinks a 20-ounce sugared beverage may be surprised to know it contains about 66 grams of added sugar, which would be listed on the label as 132 percent of the Daily Value.

We know that consumers may need some help getting used to this new information. Coming to FDA from outside of government with a background in public health nutrition, I have a great appreciation for the need to educate people to use the information we provide to them. I look forward to working with the nutrition community in this effort.

Susan Mayne, Ph.D., is FDA’s Director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

FDA Science Forum 2015: Views of FDA

FDA’s 2015 Science Forum attracted more than 800 people from the scientific community. Here’s what some attendees said about the innovative research going on at the agency and why FDA can be a valuable collaborator in research aimed at transforming food safety and medical product development. If you couldn’t attend the FDA science forum, you can still see all the presentations on our web site.

FDA China Office’s Lixia Wang Wins Award for HHS Locally-Employed Staff

By: Mary Lou Valdez

The FDA’s mission to ensure that food is safe and medical products are effective for use by U.S. consumers and patients is widely recognized.

Lou Valdez

Mary Lou Valdez, FDA’s Associate Commissioner for International Programs

A lesser-known fact is that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) employs more than 1,700 locally-employed (LE) staff in 60 countries to uphold its mission across five operating divisions, including FDA. Dr. Lixia Wang, a locally-employed staff member working for FDA in China, exemplifies the contributions of our LE staff and is the recipient of the annual HHS LE Staff of the Year Award.

China is a key supplier of goods imported to the U.S. The FDA has made significant regulatory in-roads since establishing its China post in 2008 and in many ways these are due to the contributions made by Dr. Wang and other LE staff in the world’s most populous country.

For example, Dr. Wang was essential in the negotiations of bilateral agreements for the placement of additional staff in China. With Dr. Wang’s contributions, FDA finalized these important agreements, which pave the way for FDA to more than triple its staff size in China. This move will bolster FDA’s work to protect and promote the health of consumers and patients in the U.S. and around the world.

Dr. Lixia Wang

Dr. Lixia Wang in Beijing

Dr. Wang, who has served as Medical Research Scientist for FDA’s China Office since 2009, was cited for her central role in negotiations concerning the Implementing Arrangements with China’s Food and Drug Administration, and Implementing Arrangement Between the Food and Drug Administration and the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine.

In addition, Dr. Wang has made significant contributions to the HHS mission in China since joining U.S. Embassy Beijing in 2006. From 2006 to 2009, she served as senior local staff in the Office of the HHS Health Attaché, and played a key role in strengthening U.S.-China collaboration on infectious disease.

During that time, she also supported the FDA response to emerging problems associated with melamine in dairy and pet products, and worked to address contaminated blood thinner sourced from China. She played a key role in the 2007 negotiations of binding agreements with the Chinese Government on the safety of FDA-regulated products, and on the opening of FDA’s first-ever overseas office in 2008.

FDA congratulates Dr. Wang, and takes pride in the recognition for excellence and commitment to global public health that she brings to FDA with this award.

Mary Lou Valdez is FDA’s Associate Commissioner for International Programs

Looking at the Road Ahead for FSMA

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. And in this last of four video blogs, they share their insights on next steps as FDA moves from rule-making to implementation. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face.)

Thinking About FSMA Issues

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. And in this third of four video blogs, they share their insights on the challenges ahead as FDA moves from rule-making to implementation. The next blog focuses on next steps. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

Continuing the Conversation About FSMA

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. And in this second of four video blogs, they share their insights on the opportunities that FSMA makes possible for the global food safety system. The next blogs focus on challenges and momentum. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

Coming Together to Talk About FSMA

Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) involves people at all segments of the food supply chain, from farm to table. On April 23-24, 2015, FDA held a public meeting in Washington D.C. to discuss its plans to implement FSMA rules designed to build a food safety system that focuses on prevention and risk. The meeting drew hundreds of people in person and thousands joined the webcast. They included consumers, growers, manufacturers, importers, advocates, state and federal government officials, and representatives from other nations. This first of four video blogs focuses on the insights of FDA leaders. Over the next few weeks, the blogs will share the insights of FDA experts and other meeting participants, both in the government and the private sector, on the opportunities, challenges and momentum that FSMA presents. (The second video is Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

Protecting Consumers from Trans Fat

By: Susan Mayne

FDA is taking a step today to remove artificial trans fat from the food supply. This action will save many thousands of lives.

Susan MaynePHOs or partially hydrogenated oils have been used as ingredients since the 1950s to improve the shelf-life of processed foods. FDA has issued a final determination that PHOs, the primary source of industrially-produced trans fat in processed foods, are not “Generally Recognized as Safe” or GRAS. This means that PHOs may no longer be added to food after June 18, 2018, unless they are otherwise approved by FDA.

In this case, it has become clear that what’s good for extending shelf-life is not equally good for extending human life. A 2002 report by the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine found a direct correlation between intake of trans fat and increased levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is commonly known as “bad” cholesterol, because it contributes to clogged, damaged arteries.

What this means is that there is an increased risk of heart disease, so much so that this action is expected to reduce coronary heart disease and prevent thousands of fatal heart attacks each year.

In 2006, FDA required that manufacturers declare the amount of trans fat on the Nutrition Facts label because of these public health concerns. Many manufacturers responded by voluntarily changing their product formulations to reduce or eliminate trans fat, and consumers started avoiding foods with trans fat.

Despite the declines in trans fat in foods, PHOs have continued to be found in some brands of popular food products, such as frostings, microwave popcorn, packaged pies, frozen pizzas, stick margarines and coffee creamers. And for consumers who consistently choose products with added PHOs, their daily intake of industrially-produced trans fat is approximately twice as high as the average consumer. Today, FDA has issued its determination that PHOs are not generally recognized as safe.

We are establishing a three year compliance period. This will allow for an orderly process as companies make the transition — to reformulate products and if they choose, to allow companies or other interested parties to use the food additive petition process to present evidence to FDA as to whether any uses of PHOs meet our standard for safety. Thus, industry is responsible for providing evidence to FDA to demonstrate safety, while FDA is responsible for evaluating that evidence to determine whether to approve PHOs for any specific intended use.

We know that many companies have already removed PHOs and we expect that others will accelerate the phasing out of PHOs based on today’s action. FDA encourages consumers seeking to reduce trans fat intake to check the Nutrition Facts label for trans fat. The most effective way to avoid PHOs is to check the ingredient list for partially hydrogenated oils. Even if trans fat is listed as “0”, some PHOs could be in the product.

At the heart of FDA’s mission is a responsibility to ensure that the foods we eat, and share with our family, are as safe as possible. It’s a responsibility to protect health by taking action when needed, based on the best available science. This action will ultimately allow all of us to enjoy safer foods and healthier lives.

Susan Mayne, Ph.D., is the Director of FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

FDA Continues its Collaboration with Canada in Phase 2 of the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council

By: Lou Valdez, M.S.M.

For more than 30 years, FDA has enjoyed a robust partnership with our Canadian regulatory colleagues. In FDA, we are excited to build upon this relationship in Phase 2 of the U.S.–Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC).

Lou ValdezThe RCC was established in 2011 by U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to develop smarter and more efficient and effective approaches to regulatory cooperation between the two countries. The RCC aims to bring the U.S. and Canadian regulators and stakeholders closer in terms of sharing information, combining expertise, eliminating duplicative work and creating an enabling environment to foster and facilitate ideas.

In Phase 1 of the RCC, our governments identified important regulatory issues to work together to improve. For example, as a result of the cooperation between FDA and Health Canada, we reduced the regulatory burden for industry through the development of the Common Electronic Submission Gateway (CESG). Led by our FDA Medical Product Centers, the CESG allows industry to simultaneously submit electronic applications to both FDA and Health Canada for pharmaceutical and biological products.

In Phase 2, over the next three years, FDA has committed to work with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Health Canada in the areas of:

  • Food Safety
  • Medical Devices
  • Over-the-Counter Drug Products
  • Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, and
  • Veterinary Drugs.

Together with CFIA and Health Canada, we developed five individual work plans describing specific activities within the above areas and two Regulatory Partnership Statements outlining the institutional frameworks for this cooperation.

Throughout the implementation of these work plans, American and Canadian stakeholders will have opportunities to engage with the regulatory agencies to provide updates on significant industry and consumer trends and associated implications for regulatory systems.

FDA is committed to continuing our valued partnership with Canada and using the RCC as an important tool upon which to build. Learn more about FDA’s work under the RCC at http://www.trade.gov/rcc/.

Lou Valdez, M.S.M., is FDA’s Associate Commissioner for International Programs