A Quarter Century of Groundbreaking Science: The Forensic Chemistry Center

By: Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D.

This month marks the 25th anniversary of our Forensic Chemistry Center (FCC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. I recently joined former and current administrators and staff of this lab—one of FDA’s many incredible field laboratories—at an event celebrating this milestone.

Acting FDA Commissioner, Stephen Ostroff, M.D.One thing is clear: The last quarter-century has been a period of tremendous success at the FCC. FCC scientists use their scientific analysis and original research to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics and effects of adulterants on products regulated by the Agency, including chemical fingerprinting of poisons, glass, pharmaceuticals, food products and product packaging materials. By analyzing physical samples they can identify counterfeits, trace the origin of a pathogen or solve a crime.

In short, they are the CSI of FDA.

The commitment, expertise, and curiosity of FCC scientists have helped FDA overcome many scientific challenges, and made an extraordinary difference in the lives and safety of millions of Americans. Time and again the sophisticated analyses of puzzling substances by our scientists—often using innovative, esoteric methods, and groundbreaking research, along with the development of new processes and procedures—have made a critical difference in FDA’s ability to investigate and enforce–and protect the American public.

FCC’s work has paved the way for passage of important laws, legal prosecutions, and consumer protection activities like recalls. And it has helped strengthen international relationships and advance international cooperation to ensure product quality and consumer safety.

Just a few highlights of FCC’s important efforts include:

  • In the 1990s, the lab supported some of FDA’s early work evaluating nicotine, which was recently cited in the proposed rule to deem additional tobacco products subject to the agency’s tobacco product authorities;
  • In 2001, after 22 people died in the Croatian Republic after receiving dialysis using certain devices, FCC’s analysis identified the presence of a toxic performance fluid in those devices that resulted in their recall by the manufacturers;
  • FCC investigated numerous illnesses and deaths of cats and dogs during 2007-8, which led to the determination that the pet food was adulterated with melamine and related compounds;
  • FCC’s investigation and analysis following the death of cattle in Washington State helped the FBI rule out the possibility that it was caused by terrorism;
  • Following the deaths of a number of infants in India who had been given the measles vaccine, FCC investigated the vaccine’s manufacturing process and discovered that the cause was not, as initially feared, a vaccine of poor quality. Instead the children had received pancuronium bromide, a muscle relaxant, which had been packaged in vials with similar size and shape to the vaccine, rather than the vaccine itself. This discovery was communicated to the Indian government, leading to a critical change in their immunization practices; and,
  • FCC developed a method for examining the sea animals impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which helped determine when the seafood would be safe to consume.

It is an extraordinary record. And it’s meant so much to FDA—and the nation—over the past 25 years. But the anniversary and success of this one lab also underscores the remarkable work done by all of FDA’s laboratories across the country. These labs and the districts in which they are located are the critical front line eyes and ears of FDA. And they are the springboard for excellent science.

Good science is fundamental to the mission of FDA. We need it to make good regulatory decisions. It’s what the public expects and deserves. By being able to handle and apply the science of today and anticipate the science of tomorrow we can be more flexible and adaptive, and support innovation.

Having seen the impressive and important work our labs are doing, I’m more committed than ever of the need to invest in better facilities and the best support. We must maintain state-of-the-art laboratories and research facilities, and attract, hire, and retain the best scientists to work in them. First-rate regulatory science requires first-rate scientists working in first-rate facilities.

It’s why I’ve made this a priority for FDA. And why we will put it high on our list of subjects for discussion with Congress as they shape future budgets for the Agency.

The scientists in FDA’s field laboratories are among the unsung heroes of FDA’s work to protect the public health. So let me congratulate and thank those at the FCC and across FDA on the milestone occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Forensic Chemistry Center.

Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D., is Acting Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Need a Guidance Document? We’ve Got You Covered

By: Chris Mulieri, PMP

We all understand the frustration of searching online for something and not finding it. The Food and Drug Administration recently helped end this problem by making it faster and easier to find our guidance documents – some of the most requested items on our website.

Chris MulieriGuidance documents represent FDA’s current thinking on a particular subject. Currently, there are about 3,100 of them – and the list is growing.

FDA’s Web & Digital Media team and the Office of Information Management and Technology have created a dynamic search list on one site so you can go to just one page and find the guidance documents you need, no matter where they are on FDA.gov. This search tool is powerful and easy to use. Now you can go to just one search box to find what you need in moments, instead of the 10 different pages on FDA’s website where guidance documents are posted.

It doesn’t matter if it’s a guidance document on devices, drugs, biologics, tobacco, veterinary medicine, or foods – it’s all there.

We did this as part of FDA’s Transparency Initiative and in response to the feedback we got from our stakeholders via the American Customer Service Index (ACSI) online survey. They told us just how hard and time-consuming it was for them to find these important documents. So we decided to do something about it.

It’s not practical for us to put these documents all in one place. So, we assembled a working group with representatives from each of FDA’s Centers (which post the guidance documents on their own sites) and developed the search criteria.

In addition, we tagged the documents with metadata (search terms) needed to make search and filtering functions work as intended. Now, the list automatically populates as you enter search terms and filters. Each column is sortable.

You can narrow your search by filtering on different categories, including product, date issued, FDA organization, document type, and subject. Refine your search by draft guidance, final guidance, whether it’s open for comment, or by comment closing date.

How are we doing?

Since the launch of the guidance search in December 2014, page views have increased from about 22,000 to more than 136,000 for the first quarter of 2015. For the first time, the page is among the top visited on FDA’s website. And we’ve seen improved user satisfaction, reflected in the feedback in the ACSI responses.

We hope you’ll try the new guidance document search page soon and let us know what you think.

Chris Mulieri, PMP, is FDA’s Director, Web & Digital Media, Office of External Affairs.

Talking Across International Borders About FSMA

By: Michael R. Taylor

Michael R. TaylorAll countries face the challenges presented by a food supply that is increasingly global, and consumers rightfully expect that the food they eat is safe no matter where it comes from. We all have the same goals: safe food, consumer confidence, and efficient and effective oversight to reach those goals.

With that in mind, our partnerships with foreign food producers and our regulatory counterparts in other countries are increasingly important. As we get closer to releasing the final rules that will implement the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), we are reaching across borders to ensure that our international stakeholders have the information and training they need to meet these new standards.

The need for this international outreach is a message that came through loud and clear at a public meeting this April on FSMA implementation. The feedback from agricultural attaches, overseas business owners, and representatives from governments worldwide was that they want to hear more about what to expect, and how to prepare for what’s ahead.

To address these concerns, we invited representatives of foreign embassies and other international stakeholders to attend a roundtable discussion on June 23, 2015. In the attached video, you’ll see both the optimism and concerns that surfaced during the meeting at FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in College Park, Md.

On June 23, 2015, FDA held a meeting of representatives of foreign embassies and international stakeholders involved in implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). This is the fifth video blog in which the people who will be helping to make FSMA a reality share their insights on challenges, opportunities and next steps. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

One sentiment, expressed at the meeting, was: “The United States isn’t the only country concerned about food safety.” From FDA’s perspective, we’re counting on that as we build the partnerships we’ll need to help ensure the safety of foods all over the world. We will join forces with agriculture and public health officials in other countries, international industries and associations, multilateral organizations, and academia to address the unique needs of foreign food producers who must comply with the new FSMA regulations.

We’re operating under the premise that the vast majority of food producers, both foreign and domestic, want to ensure the safety of their foods. We will be relying on our international partners to help us find ways to provide solid verification that the FSMA standards are being met.

The earliest compliance dates will be a year after we publish the first final rules this summer. In the meantime, we are working with our public and private partners to develop training for domestic and international food producers. These partners include the U.S. Department of Agriculture, grower and local food system groups, and the Food Safety Preventive Controls and Produce Safety alliances, whose members include the FDA, local and state regulatory agencies, the food industry, and academia.

We are committed to making FSMA implementation as open and transparent a process as possible. The April public meeting and the June roundtable discussion were just two steps in that process. But they were important steps because both provided open and frank conversations.

We’ve got a long road ahead. We’ve long worked with other countries as trading and regulatory partners. Now, we aspire to be food safety partners, working together and supporting each other when problems arise. These partnerships ultimately will benefit consumers all over the world.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

FDA Science Forum 2015: Views of FDA

FDA’s 2015 Science Forum attracted more than 800 people from the scientific community. Here’s what some attendees said about the innovative research going on at the agency and why FDA can be a valuable collaborator in research aimed at transforming food safety and medical product development. If you couldn’t attend the FDA science forum, you can still see all the presentations on our web site.

FDA Engages Internationally to Promote Access to Safe, Effective Animal Medicines

By: Bettye Walters, D.V.M.

Regulators around the world are reaching across national borders as they work together to ensure the safety of veterinary medical products.

Bettye WaltersI am a veterinarian on the International Programs Team at the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM). In this role, I attended the 4th Global Animal Health Conference in Tanzania on June 24 and 25 and participated in the global dialogue about the use and availability of high quality, safe and effective veterinary medical products in developing countries, especially in Africa. FDA embraces the One Health approach, which recognizes the connection between the health of people, animals and the environment.

I was accompanied by my colleague Steven Vaughn, D.V.M., who heads CVM’s Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation. Dr. Vaughn has years of experience exploring the most effective ways to regulate animal medications to ensure that they are high quality and safe.

The conference was attended by leading figures from the world’s governments, academia, industries, and international organizations and its focus was on the concept of “regulatory convergence,” a process that allows countries to bring their regulatory processes into closer alignment. We tackled important ideas related to promoting market control, including the surveillance of veterinary products on the market and improving access to effective animal drugs. We also discussed fostering systems for mutual recognition of regulatory oversight and standards, forming regional organizations, and implementing African regional harmonization initiatives to create a convergence of international guidelines.

If all countries can agree on the testing and safety of animal drugs, each country could have faster access to new medical products and be able to better leverage often-limited resources. While globalization provides many challenges, FDA believes it also offers opportunities for innovation if regulators, industry, and academia are working together for the benefit of all countries.

It’s a small world and solutions to public health problems, for both people and animals, are increasingly found on the world stage. FDA is committed to working with its global partners to promote cooperation in veterinary medicine.

Bettye Walters, D.V.M., is a veterinary medical officer on the International Programs Team at FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine.

FDA Continues its Collaboration with Canada in Phase 2 of the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council

By: Lou Valdez, M.S.M.

For more than 30 years, FDA has enjoyed a robust partnership with our Canadian regulatory colleagues. In FDA, we are excited to build upon this relationship in Phase 2 of the U.S.–Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC).

Lou ValdezThe RCC was established in 2011 by U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to develop smarter and more efficient and effective approaches to regulatory cooperation between the two countries. The RCC aims to bring the U.S. and Canadian regulators and stakeholders closer in terms of sharing information, combining expertise, eliminating duplicative work and creating an enabling environment to foster and facilitate ideas.

In Phase 1 of the RCC, our governments identified important regulatory issues to work together to improve. For example, as a result of the cooperation between FDA and Health Canada, we reduced the regulatory burden for industry through the development of the Common Electronic Submission Gateway (CESG). Led by our FDA Medical Product Centers, the CESG allows industry to simultaneously submit electronic applications to both FDA and Health Canada for pharmaceutical and biological products.

In Phase 2, over the next three years, FDA has committed to work with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Health Canada in the areas of:

  • Food Safety
  • Medical Devices
  • Over-the-Counter Drug Products
  • Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, and
  • Veterinary Drugs.

Together with CFIA and Health Canada, we developed five individual work plans describing specific activities within the above areas and two Regulatory Partnership Statements outlining the institutional frameworks for this cooperation.

Throughout the implementation of these work plans, American and Canadian stakeholders will have opportunities to engage with the regulatory agencies to provide updates on significant industry and consumer trends and associated implications for regulatory systems.

FDA is committed to continuing our valued partnership with Canada and using the RCC as an important tool upon which to build. Learn more about FDA’s work under the RCC at http://www.trade.gov/rcc/.

Lou Valdez, M.S.M., is FDA’s Associate Commissioner for International Programs

Veterinary Feed Directive Will Protect Both People and Animals

By: Michael R. Taylor

For the past several years, the FDA has been taking steps to fundamentally change how antimicrobials are legally used in food-producing animals. The agency is moving to eliminate the use of these drugs for production purposes – such as speeding weight gain – and bring their remaining therapeutic uses in feed and water under the supervision of licensed veterinarians. These changes are critical to ensuring these drugs are used judiciously and only when necessary for legitimate animal health purposes.

Michael TaylorToday, we added another element to our overall strategy, one that recognizes the important role that veterinarians fulfill as guardians of animal health and preservers of judicious use of medically important antimicrobials. The Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) final rule lays out what veterinarians must do when they need to authorize the use of these products in feed to protect the animals they serve.

This rule is a key piece of FDA’s initiative to combat the overuse of antimicrobial medications — including antibiotics — in both people and animals, which has created a global health crisis. Disease-causing bacteria commonly develop resistance to the medications created to kill them, but misuse of these important treatments ups the ante. FDA is particularly concerned about the use of “medically important” antibiotics in animal agriculture because they are also used to treat human disease and could become useless if bacteria become resistant to their effects.

Of course, change takes time. Since December 2013, we have been implementing a plan with animal drug companies to phase out the use of medically important antibiotics for enhanced food production. We have been working since then with drug companies, animal producers and veterinarians to change how these antibiotics are used in animals that enter the food supply, such as cattle, hogs and poultry.

Partnership and collaboration is delivering results. All 25 affected animal drug companies agreed to work with FDA to remove production uses for growth promotion and feed efficiency from the approved uses of their drug products, and move the therapeutic uses of these products from over-the-counter availability to a marketing status requiring veterinary oversight. By December 2016, we expect to see significant changes in the way medically important antibiotics are used in animal agriculture as compared to how they have been used for decades.

What will this mean in practice? Once these changes are fully implemented, it will be illegal to use these medically important antibiotics for production purposes, period. Instead of having unrestricted over-the-counter access, animal producers will need to obtain authorization from a licensed veterinarian to use these medications for therapeutic uses — for prevention, control or treatment of a specifically identified disease.

The VFD rule respects the diversity of circumstances that veterinarians encounter on the farm, but also ensures that their oversight is in line with nationally consistent principles. They will be required to have sufficient knowledge of the animals being treated by examining them or visiting the facility at which their care is managed.

Specifically, veterinarians play an important role in animal and human health and their oversight, as an integral part of the VFD process, will help ensure that medically important antimicrobial drugs will be used in feed according to label directions and only when appropriate to meet specific animal health needs. That means using a product for a specifically-identified disease, at the right dose, and for the period of time stipulated on the product label.

We aren’t done yet. The next step is getting the data we need on how medically important antibiotics are now being used on farms, information that will be essential to measuring the impact of our judicious use strategy. Right now we collect antibiotic sales and distribution data but do not have explicit regulatory authority to require data to be submitted on how antibiotics are actually being used in farm animals. We are evaluating how to obtain additional detailed information on such things as the species, indication, dose, and duration of use in order to better understand links between usage patterns and trends in antibiotic resistance. This will help provide a more comprehensive and science-based picture of antibiotic use and resistance in animal agriculture. FDA is actively engaged with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and a wide array of stakeholders to fill this need. We plan to hold a public meeting this summer to discuss how to collect and present this data.

Finally, FDA has been actively engaging veterinary organizations, animal producer organizations, and other stakeholders to express concern about some currently-approved preventive, therapeutic uses of medically important antibiotics that have no limit on how long they can be given to the animal. This is not what we consider a judicious use. We believe that veterinarians should work with their clients to explore alternative approaches for managing certain animal health conditions, and we will be working with animal producers and drug companies to make any needed changes in approved conditions of use.

Antimicrobial resistance is everyone’s problem. It requires determination and cooperation to make the changes needed to protect the utility of these life-saving drugs. We are grateful for the way our partners and stakeholders across the food system are responding to this challenge.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

FDA to Industry: Let’s Increase the Availability of Safe, Effective Animal Drugs

By: Martine Hartogensis, D.V.M.

Just as drugs for people benefit from FDA review to ensure their safety, effectiveness and quality, so do drugs for animals.

Martine HartogensisUnfortunately, this fact is ignored by some companies that sell unapproved animal drugs. By bypassing the FDA’s drug approval process, these firms potentially put the health of animals—and people—at risk. That’s why the FDA is working to get these products off the market.

There are different pathways to FDA approval and legal marketing of an animal drug product, but each pathway requires a drug company to expend both time and financial resources to generate the appropriate scientific evidence to support the approval. Companies that bypass the FDA drug approval process may be endangering the animals given unapproved drugs and people who either handle the unapproved drugs or eat food from animals treated with them. In addition, those who market unapproved drugs have an unfair competitive edge, and might prompt others to also break the law in order to compete in the marketplace. This slippery slope leads to a diminished supply of animal drugs that have been reviewed by the FDA for safety and effectiveness.

FDA’s rigorous review process also makes certain that the manufacturing process preserves the drug’s strength, quality and purity, and ensures that it has been consistently produced from batch to batch. FDA also requires that the product labeling is truthful and complete.

In some circumstances, the unapproved drug may be the only one of its kind available. In these cases, FDA often works with the company to develop the evidence that the product is safe and effective. Making innovative, FDA-approved animal medications legally marketable is an important part of FDA’s mission to protect the public health.

But while being helpful, FDA is also stepping up efforts to combat illegal animal drug sales, both on the ground and online.

We’ve recently issued warning letters to several marketers, distributors and manufacturers of unapproved animal drugs and expect to issue more in the coming year. Our enforcement actions could include seizures of violative products and/or injunctions against manufacturers and distributors of unapproved animal drugs. We also continue to regularly update the agency’s web page on unapproved animal drugs with information for veterinarians and industry.

We’ll continue to do all we can to make the animal drug approval process as straightforward and efficient as possible. But we need industry to do its part, so that we can continue to make more safe and effective drugs available to veterinarians, animal producers and pet owners.

Martine Hartogensis, D.V.M., is Deputy Director, Office of Surveillance and Compliance at FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine

A Year of Significant Progress in Public Health

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.A new year offers both an opportunity to look forward and an opportunity to reflect on the achievements of the previous year. And, in 2014, FDA’s accomplishments were substantial, touching on many of the agency’s broad responsibilities to protect and promote the public health.

Whether our achievements involved medical product safety and innovation, food safety and nutrition, tobacco control, or other areas of our important work, all were accomplished thanks in large part to our ability to respond to evolving needs and opportunities including the embrace of new approvals, technologies and cutting-edge science.

Consider these highlights:

Drug Approvals: This past calendar year, FDA approved 51 novel drugs and biologics (41 by CDER and 10 by CBER), the most in almost 20 years. Among CDER’s 2014 approvals are treatments for cancer, hepatitis C and type-2 diabetes, as well as the most new drugs for “orphan” diseases since Congress enacted the Orphan Drug Act over 30 years ago. Seventeen of these new approvals are “first in class” therapies, which represent new approaches in the treatment of disease. In addition, CBER approved many important biological products in 2014, including a number of groundbreaking vaccines for meningitis B, the flu, and certain types of Human Papillomavirus, the latter of which is expected to prevent approximately 90 percent of the cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers caused by HPV.

These developments are a testament not just to our expanding understanding of human biology, the biology of disease and the molecular mechanisms that drive the disease process, but also to FDA’s innovative approaches to help expedite development and review of medical products that target unmet medical needs, while adhering to the established standards for safety and efficacy. These include enhanced guidance to shape the research and development agenda, early input on clinical study needs and design, expedited review programs, targeted regulatory advice and other tools and incentives that spur investment and innovation in new medical products to address unmet medical needs.

Opioids: This past year FDA took several actions to address the abuse of opioid drugs. First, we approved abuse deterrent labeling for three opioid products that are designed to deter prescription drug abuse. These drugs used different technologies to combat the abuse problem in different ways, such as by making the product resistant to crushing or dissolving or using “aversive technology” to discourage users from taking more than the approved dosage of the drug. To help encourage the development of more drugs in abuse-deterrent forms, we are also working to provide additional advice to manufacturers. Although abuse-deterrent opioid drugs are not a silver bullet to prevent opioid abuse, we believe that our work in this area will give physicians effective new treatment options with less risk of abuse.

FDA also worked to improve the treatment of patients who overdose on opioids. We approved a new dosage form of naloxone, with an autoinjector to enable a caregiver to administer the drug in the emergency treatment of opioid overdose (as it rapidly reverses the effects of an overdose). While we continue to support development in this area, this approval offers a new valuable tool to help prevent the tragedy of opioid drug overdose.

Antibiotic Resistance: We made important strides in confronting the growing resistance of some bacteria to antimicrobial drugs. Our efforts, which are a critical part of the recently unveiled National Strategy on Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, offer a multi-pronged approach that recognizes that to effectively address this challenge means simultaneously addressing the many different causes for increasing antibiotic resistance. One important response has been efforts to expand the pipeline of new medical products, including therapeutics to treat and cure infection, diagnostics to aid in the identification of the cause of infection and of resistant infections, and vaccines to help prevent infection with bacteria in the first place.

These efforts are already having an impact. In 2014, FDA approved four novel systemic antibiotics. In contrast, only five new antibiotics had been approved in the previous ten year period.

In addition to working on the human medical product side, we also developed and, over the next two years will be implementing, an important complementary strategy to eliminate the use of medically important antibiotics for growth promotion in food-producing animals. This strategy, once fully implemented, also will bring the remaining uses of such drugs to treat, control or prevent disease in these animals under the oversight of veterinarians. All 26 animal health companies who produce those drugs have committed to participate, and 31 products already have been withdrawn from the market.

Pharmacy Compounding: We continued to respond effectively to the 2012 outbreak of fungal meningitis that was linked to contaminated compounded drugs. This included conducting more than 90 inspections of compounding facilities across the nation in the past year. As a result, numerous firms that engaged in poor sterile practices stopped making sterile drugs, and many firms recalled drugs that have been made under substandard conditions. Where appropriate, we have worked with the Department of Justice to pursue enforcement action against some of these facilities.

We also have continued to implement the compounding provisions of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA), and to develop and implement policies to address compounding by state-licensed pharmacies and the new category of registered outsourcing facilities.

Food Safety: Over the past year, the Agency has made great strides in implementing the landmark FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Through our proposed rules for preventive controls requirements for both human and animal food, standards for produce safety, foreign supplier verification programs, third party auditor accreditation, focused mitigation strategies to prevent intentional adulteration of food aimed at causing large-scale public health harm, and requirements for sanitary transportation practices to ensure the safe transport of food, we are working to ensure the safety of American consumers related to the foods they eat.

Nutrition: Good health depends not just on food safety, but also on what we choose to eat. FDA plays an important role in promoting good nutrition and healthy food choices by helping consumers understand the importance and benefits of good nutrition – and of being able to make informed choices about what we eat.

New rules in 2014 to finalize requiring calorie information on restaurant menus and vending machines give our citizens information they need to make healthy food choices and hopefully help reduce the epidemic of obesity in the United States. We also proposed changes to the familiar “Nutrition Facts” label on packaged foods which, when finalized, will give our citizens updated nutrition information, reflecting the most current nutrition science, to help them make healthy choices when purchasing packaged foods.

Tobacco Control: There are few areas that have as profound an impact on public health as tobacco products, which is why, five years ago, Congress gave FDA the responsibility to oversee the manufacture, marketing, distribution, and sale of tobacco products.

Over the past year, we worked with state authorities to conduct more than 124,000 inspections of retailers to enforce the ban on the sale of tobacco products to children. We unveiled the first of its kind national public education campaign—The Real Cost—to reduce youth smoking. And we took the first steps towards extending the agency’s tobacco product authority over additional products such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, waterpipe (hookah) tobacco, and dissolvables not already subject to such authority through our proposed “Deeming Rule.” In addition, as part of ongoing work on product review decisions, eleven tobacco products that were allowed to enter the market during a provisional period established by the Tobacco Control Act were found “not substantially equivalent” to a predicate tobacco product. As a result of this finding, these products can no longer be sold or distributed in interstate commerce or imported into the United States.

Ebola: The tragic Ebola epidemic in West Africa demonstrates that we do not have the luxury of closing our eyes – or our borders – to the public health problems that exist in the rest of the world. I’m proud that FDA has played an important role in the response to this disease, working closely with colleagues in our government as well as the scientific community, industry and a range of other organizations and nations. We have helped facilitate the development, testing, manufacture, and availability of investigational products for use in diagnosing, treating and preventing Ebola, and worked with sponsors and health care providers to facilitate access to these products as clinical circumstances warrant. In August 2014, FDA designated the drug Z-Mapp as an orphan drug for Ebola, with the hope that this would incentivize further development and study.

And I’m very pleased to report that FDA is represented on the ground in West Africa by dedicated officers of the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service who continue to staff and operate the Monrovia Medical Unit in Liberia that was built to treat the health workers who became ill responding to the outbreak. Like everything FDA does, both at home and abroad, our actions on Ebola represent our agency’s continuing commitment to health and safety, and the use of science to advance these important goals.

I am extremely proud of our accomplishments in 2014, and I am confident that FDA will have a successful 2015, as we continue our work to protect and promote the public health.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

FDA’s FY 2016 Budget Request

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.FDA oversees products that represent more than 20 cents of every dollar that American consumers spend. Today, FDA presented its FY 2016 budget to Congress.This sensible budget request will help ensure that FDA can continue to fulfill its vast responsibilities to protect the public health, safety, and quality of life of the American public.

I want to share the cover letter that I wrote to Congress outlining some of our specific proposals.


Letter from the Commissioner

I am pleased to present the FY 2016 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Budget.

FDA fulfills its important mission to promote and protect health in an increasingly complex and globalized world in many ways.  The scope of our work includes assuring that foods are safe, wholesome, sanitary and properly labeled; ensuring that human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products, and medical devices intended for human use are safe and effective; and regulating tobacco products.  We also play a lead role in protecting the public from electronic product radiation and assuring that cosmetics and dietary supplements are safe and properly labeled.  Finally, we have devoted – and will continue to devote – substantial resources to advancing the public health by helping to speed product innovations.

FDA’s responsibilities continue to expand as we work to fulfill the mandates of groundbreaking legislation passed in recent years, including the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) of 2011, the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012, and the Drug Quality and Security Act of 2013.  Further, with so many FDA-regulated products manufactured in whole or in part outside of our borders, FDA is keenly focused on the complexities of regulating in a global marketplace.

In FY 2014, we took important steps to finalize a key set of proposed food safety rules; worked to improve the safety of compounded pharmaceutical products by conducting more than 90 inspections and implementing compounding legislation through proposed regulations, guidances, and other actions; published the “deeming rule” to extend FDA’s tobacco authority; and collaborated with federal, international, and industry partners to expedite the development and availability of medical products.  In addition, FDA has worked intensively to respond to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa by facilitating the development and availability of investigational diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines with the potential to help combat the epidemic.

FDA continues to seek new ways to obtain the most public health value for the federal dollar as we implement expanded authorities.  The products that FDA regulates are essential to public health, safety, and quality of life and represent over 20 cents of every consumer dollar spent on products in the United States.  Yet, in terms of our FDA budget, each American taxpayer contributes approximately $8 per year for the vast array of protections and services provided by FDA.

In FY 2016, we are requesting essential and timely resources to address critical food and medical product safety issues.  Mindful of the fiscal environment, we have identified targeted reductions where possible and identified long-term needs for additional user fees to balance budget authority growth.  FDA is requesting a total of $4.9 billion to support our various mandates to protect the American people.  This includes a $148 million budget authority increase to focus on the following:

  • delivering a farm-to-table system of prevention, including improved oversight of imported foods, through effectively implementing the final rules required by FSMA;
  • combating the growing threat of antibiotic resistance – in which drugs become less effective, or ineffective, against harmful bacteria;
  • promoting the development and appropriate use of reliable molecular and genetic diagnostics – precision medicine tools – to “personalize” the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease;
  • implementing key FDASIA requirements to improve medical product review and inspections;
  • addressing the safety of compounded drugs;
  • continuing implementation of new requirements for review of sunscreen ingredients under the Sunscreen Innovation Act; and
  • supporting modern facilities to provide the laboratories and office space needed to meet FDA’s expanded legislative mandates.

As a science-based regulatory agency with a public health mission, FDA plays a unique and essential role in promoting and protecting public health and safety.  We are committed to meeting the needs and expectations of the American people.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Commissioner of Food and Drugs