Traveling to the Heartland to Discuss Antimicrobial Resistance

By: Michael R. Taylor

One of the great privileges and pleasures of my job is getting to see the food system at work. Whether it’s a big cereal manufacturer in Minnesota, a small New England produce operator, or, most recently, a Midwest cattle feeding operation, I always learn something new, and I get to meet people who are working hard to put food on our tables.

Michael R. TaylorLast month, I traveled with some FDA colleagues to Kansas at the invitation of U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran to learn about the practicalities of beef production, including how animal drugs are being used and managed. Senator Moran, who goes by “Jerry” back home and clearly enjoys being there, graciously accompanied us the whole day. We had a great experience.

For starters, to paraphrase Dorothy, when you spend a day in Kansas, you know you’re not in Washington any more. It’s partly the famous Midwestern friendliness, which we encountered at every turn as we walked the Kansas State campus, toured the K-State College of Veterinary Medicine, and visited Great Bend Feeding, Inc.

But it’s also the tangible presence of the land itself and people who for generations have built small communities on the foundation of agriculture and food production. These are folks who live and work far from Washington, and who often view Washington skeptically, but with whom we have a common cause in providing Americans the safest possible food supply.

FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) regulates the safety and effectiveness of drugs for both food animals and our pets. When it comes to food animals, this includes ensuring that the meat, milk or eggs do not contain any unsafe drug residues. But it also includes minimizing the risk of antimicrobial resistance, which is a natural biological response to the use of antibiotics, whether in human medicine or in animal production. The public health problem occurs when drugs we rely on to treat human infections are rendered ineffective.

FDA is addressing this problem through an initiative that, by December 2016, will make illegal the use of medically important antibiotics for animal production purposes – such as growth promotion – and bring remaining uses for legitimate animal health purposes under veterinary supervision. CVM’s Dr. Bill Flynn, who is leading this initiative, was my partner on our trip to Kansas.

Kansas Cattle

Cattle on the Great Bend Feeding land in Kansas.

Kansas is a leading beef producer and our trip gave us an opportunity for us to see first-hand the work being done to manage antibiotic use and the real challenges that exist so that together we can find the most practical and effective ways to ensure that these drugs are used judiciously to protect both animal and human health.

Our first stop was Kansas State University’s prestigious College of Veterinary Medicine in Manhattan. Dean Tammy Beckham joined us at the college, which prides itself on teaching, research and service to the community. We met with about 25 students involved in the care of all kinds of animals, from those found on farms, including horses and cows, to companion animals like dogs and cats. We saw a horse and cow being cared for and watched students examine, with great kindness, a tiny dog in a radiology laboratory using computer imaging technology.

We also visited the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, which supports the college’s public role in animal agriculture by examining samples taken from ailing farm animals and helping determine the right treatment. We were joined for the day by Dr. Michael Apley, a professor in the college’s clinical sciences department and a newly appointed member of the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. As a researcher and educator who reaches out to the animal production industry, Dr. Apley is at the forefront of efforts to properly manage the use of antimicrobials in food animals.

With Dr. Apley, we drove for more than two hours through the scenic Kansas prairie to reach Great Bend Feeding, a mid-size feed yard with about 30,000 head of cattle. Manager Paul Woydziak is a native of the area and the facility is staffed by local people. This is their life and their livelihood, and they take the issues of food safety and animal health very seriously.

Their job is to optimize the growth of cattle with a custom feeding program, keeping them from 120 to 280 days before they are harvested to enter the food supply. The animals are fed three times a day with feed that is produced in a mill on the property and highly controlled in terms of quality and quantity. Modern day cowboys on horseback constantly patrol the dozens of large pens looking for signs of illness, with potentially sick animals immediately evaluated by a veterinarian.

There are lessons to be learned at farms and feed yards like Great Bend. It is critical that we identify and implement the best “stewardship” practices to ensure that medically important antimicrobials are used judiciously, including for preventing disease in the animals.

And we need solid data to ensure that our strategy to promote judicious use of antimicrobials is working. We were encouraged by the detailed system that was in place at the Great Bend operation for tracking animal health and drug use. Understanding how such information is monitored in actual animal production settings is important to our ongoing discussions about practical strategies for collecting data on antimicrobial use.

So it was a great trip, and we are grateful to Sen. Moran and all of the Kansans who were so generous with their time. Keeping food safe will always involve collaboration between the public and private sectors, and to build that collaboration there is no substitute for being there in person, seeing how our food is produced, and learning from the people who dedicate their lives to that work.

The food safety problem posed by antimicrobial resistance is one that we can solve, working together.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

FDA Invests in Innovative Ways to Communicate to Hispanics

By: Gloria Sánchez-Contreras, M.A.

En Español

National Hispanic Heritage Month–celebrated annually from September 15 to October 15—gives Americans a great opportunity to celebrate the histories, cultures, and contributions of Hispanic Americans whose roots are in Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.

Gloria Sanchez-ContrerasAt FDA, we join in this celebration as we continue to use innovative ways to reach Hispanics as part of our mission to protect the public health. To achieve this goal, FDA uses media strategies that are culturally and linguistically tailored to Hispanics, who, according to research, are avid users of online and social media.

There are 54 million people of Hispanic origin in the United States, making them the nation’s largest ethnic or racial minority group, with 17 percent of the nation’s total population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The United States has the second-largest population of Spanish-speaking residents in the world, ahead of Colombia and Spain, and second to Mexico, a recent study by the Instituto Cervantes shows.

These statistics cannot go unnoticed. FDA recognizes the importance of connecting with this growing and diverse segment of our population. Consequently, we have increased our online consumer information in Spanish and developed a variety of bilingual communications strategies to reach and engage all Hispanics.

One of the most important strategies we use is to make sure that messages created for Hispanics speak to them effectively. We consider Hispanics’ informational needs, lifestyles, and cultural health beliefs both when creating new messaging and when translating messaging from English to Spanish.

For example, we know Hispanics respond better when communications are in their primary language – which can be English or Spanish – and when communications use images that relate to them. We do this by employing a bilingual and bicultural team that reviews messaging for cultural competence and adapts translations to ensure they are culturally sensitive and in plain language.

In addition to our English-language communications, we have developed strategies to reach out to Spanish-speaking Hispanics online. Our Consumer Updates and drug safety communications are regularly translated into Spanish. We share Spanish-language information through our social media channels, including Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and YouTube.

In addition, we also have a complete Web section in Spanish for consumers (, a press room (“Comunicados de Prensa”), and a central page ( that links to a variety of Spanish-language content developed across the Agency’s product centers and offices.

These are exciting times, and it is a privilege to lead some of these efforts for our agency. The Office of External Affairs works diligently across FDA to share important and timely public health news with Latino consumers, stakeholders, media, and community organizations. And during Hispanic Heritage Month—and all the months of the year–we want Hispanics to know that FDA is a trusted source of consumer information.

Gloria Sanchez-Contreras, M.A., is a Bilingual Public Affairs Specialist and the Spanish-Language Communications Lead in FDA’s Office of Media Affairs.

A Quarter Century of Groundbreaking Science: The Forensic Chemistry Center

By: Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D.

This month marks the 25th anniversary of our Forensic Chemistry Center (FCC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. I recently joined former and current administrators and staff of this lab—one of FDA’s many incredible field laboratories—at an event celebrating this milestone.

Acting FDA Commissioner, Stephen Ostroff, M.D.One thing is clear: The last quarter-century has been a period of tremendous success at the FCC. FCC scientists use their scientific analysis and original research to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics and effects of adulterants on products regulated by the Agency, including chemical fingerprinting of poisons, glass, pharmaceuticals, food products and product packaging materials. By analyzing physical samples they can identify counterfeits, trace the origin of a pathogen or solve a crime.

In short, they are the CSI of FDA.

The commitment, expertise, and curiosity of FCC scientists have helped FDA overcome many scientific challenges, and made an extraordinary difference in the lives and safety of millions of Americans. Time and again the sophisticated analyses of puzzling substances by our scientists—often using innovative, esoteric methods, and groundbreaking research, along with the development of new processes and procedures—have made a critical difference in FDA’s ability to investigate and enforce–and protect the American public.

FCC Anniversary group photo

Former and current administrators and staff of the Forensic Chemistry Center (FCC) in Cincinnati, Ohio, at an event celebrating the 25th Anniversary. From left to right: Paul Norris, Director, Office of Regulatory Science; Steve Solomon, Deputy Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs; Dr. Ostroff, Acting Commissioner of Food and Drugs; Phil Walsky, Deputy Director, Office of Criminal Investigations; Fred Fricke, former Director of FCC; and, Duane Satzger, Director of FCC.

FCC’s work has paved the way for passage of important laws, legal prosecutions, and consumer protection activities like recalls. And it has helped strengthen international relationships and advance international cooperation to ensure product quality and consumer safety.

Just a few highlights of FCC’s important efforts include:

  • In the 1990s, the lab supported some of FDA’s early work evaluating nicotine, which was recently cited in the proposed rule to deem additional tobacco products subject to the agency’s tobacco product authorities;
  • In 2001, after 22 people died in the Croatian Republic after receiving dialysis using certain devices, FCC’s analysis identified the presence of a toxic performance fluid in those devices that resulted in their recall by the manufacturers;
  • FCC investigated numerous illnesses and deaths of cats and dogs during 2007-8, which led to the determination that the pet food was adulterated with melamine and related compounds;
  • FCC’s investigation and analysis following the death of cattle in Washington State helped the FBI rule out the possibility that it was caused by terrorism;
  • Following the deaths of a number of infants in India who had been given the measles vaccine, FCC investigated the vaccine’s manufacturing process and discovered that the cause was not, as initially feared, a vaccine of poor quality. Instead the children had received pancuronium bromide, a muscle relaxant, which had been packaged in vials with similar size and shape to the vaccine, rather than the vaccine itself. This discovery was communicated to the Indian government, leading to a critical change in their immunization practices; and,
  • FCC developed a method for examining the sea animals impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which helped determine when the seafood would be safe to consume.

It is an extraordinary record. And it’s meant so much to FDA—and the nation—over the past 25 years. But the anniversary and success of this one lab also underscores the remarkable work done by all of FDA’s laboratories across the country. These labs and the districts in which they are located are the critical front line eyes and ears of FDA. And they are the springboard for excellent science.

Good science is fundamental to the mission of FDA. We need it to make good regulatory decisions. It’s what the public expects and deserves. By being able to handle and apply the science of today and anticipate the science of tomorrow we can be more flexible and adaptive, and support innovation.

Having seen the impressive and important work our labs are doing, I’m more committed than ever of the need to invest in better facilities and the best support. We must maintain state-of-the-art laboratories and research facilities, and attract, hire, and retain the best scientists to work in them. First-rate regulatory science requires first-rate scientists working in first-rate facilities.

It’s why I’ve made this a priority for FDA. And why we will put it high on our list of subjects for discussion with Congress as they shape future budgets for the Agency.

The scientists in FDA’s field laboratories are among the unsung heroes of FDA’s work to protect the public health. So let me congratulate and thank those at the FCC and across FDA on the milestone occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Forensic Chemistry Center.

Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D., is Acting Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Need a Guidance Document? We’ve Got You Covered

By: Chris Mulieri, PMP

We all understand the frustration of searching online for something and not finding it. The Food and Drug Administration recently helped end this problem by making it faster and easier to find our guidance documents – some of the most requested items on our website.

Chris MulieriGuidance documents represent FDA’s current thinking on a particular subject. Currently, there are about 3,100 of them – and the list is growing.

FDA’s Web & Digital Media team and the Office of Information Management and Technology have created a dynamic search list on one site so you can go to just one page and find the guidance documents you need, no matter where they are on This search tool is powerful and easy to use. Now you can go to just one search box to find what you need in moments, instead of the 10 different pages on FDA’s website where guidance documents are posted.

It doesn’t matter if it’s a guidance document on devices, drugs, biologics, tobacco, veterinary medicine, or foods – it’s all there.

We did this as part of FDA’s Transparency Initiative and in response to the feedback we got from our stakeholders via the American Customer Service Index (ACSI) online survey. They told us just how hard and time-consuming it was for them to find these important documents. So we decided to do something about it.

It’s not practical for us to put these documents all in one place. So, we assembled a working group with representatives from each of FDA’s Centers (which post the guidance documents on their own sites) and developed the search criteria.

In addition, we tagged the documents with metadata (search terms) needed to make search and filtering functions work as intended. Now, the list automatically populates as you enter search terms and filters. Each column is sortable.

You can narrow your search by filtering on different categories, including product, date issued, FDA organization, document type, and subject. Refine your search by draft guidance, final guidance, whether it’s open for comment, or by comment closing date.

How are we doing?

Since the launch of the guidance search in December 2014, page views have increased from about 22,000 to more than 136,000 for the first quarter of 2015. For the first time, the page is among the top visited on FDA’s website. And we’ve seen improved user satisfaction, reflected in the feedback in the ACSI responses.

We hope you’ll try the new guidance document search page soon and let us know what you think.

Chris Mulieri, PMP, is FDA’s Director, Web & Digital Media, Office of External Affairs.

Talking Across International Borders About FSMA

By: Michael R. Taylor

Michael R. TaylorAll countries face the challenges presented by a food supply that is increasingly global, and consumers rightfully expect that the food they eat is safe no matter where it comes from. We all have the same goals: safe food, consumer confidence, and efficient and effective oversight to reach those goals.

With that in mind, our partnerships with foreign food producers and our regulatory counterparts in other countries are increasingly important. As we get closer to releasing the final rules that will implement the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), we are reaching across borders to ensure that our international stakeholders have the information and training they need to meet these new standards.

The need for this international outreach is a message that came through loud and clear at a public meeting this April on FSMA implementation. The feedback from agricultural attaches, overseas business owners, and representatives from governments worldwide was that they want to hear more about what to expect, and how to prepare for what’s ahead.

To address these concerns, we invited representatives of foreign embassies and other international stakeholders to attend a roundtable discussion on June 23, 2015. In the attached video, you’ll see both the optimism and concerns that surfaced during the meeting at FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in College Park, Md.

On June 23, 2015, FDA held a meeting of representatives of foreign embassies and international stakeholders involved in implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). This is the fifth video blog in which the people who will be helping to make FSMA a reality share their insights on challenges, opportunities and next steps. (The first video is Voices of FSMA: The Road to Implementation; the second: Voices of FSMA: The Opportunities Ahead; the third: Voices of FSMA: The Challenges We Face; the fourth: Voices of FSMA: Moving Forward.)

One sentiment, expressed at the meeting, was: “The United States isn’t the only country concerned about food safety.” From FDA’s perspective, we’re counting on that as we build the partnerships we’ll need to help ensure the safety of foods all over the world. We will join forces with agriculture and public health officials in other countries, international industries and associations, multilateral organizations, and academia to address the unique needs of foreign food producers who must comply with the new FSMA regulations.

We’re operating under the premise that the vast majority of food producers, both foreign and domestic, want to ensure the safety of their foods. We will be relying on our international partners to help us find ways to provide solid verification that the FSMA standards are being met.

The earliest compliance dates will be a year after we publish the first final rules this summer. In the meantime, we are working with our public and private partners to develop training for domestic and international food producers. These partners include the U.S. Department of Agriculture, grower and local food system groups, and the Food Safety Preventive Controls and Produce Safety alliances, whose members include the FDA, local and state regulatory agencies, the food industry, and academia.

We are committed to making FSMA implementation as open and transparent a process as possible. The April public meeting and the June roundtable discussion were just two steps in that process. But they were important steps because both provided open and frank conversations.

We’ve got a long road ahead. We’ve long worked with other countries as trading and regulatory partners. Now, we aspire to be food safety partners, working together and supporting each other when problems arise. These partnerships ultimately will benefit consumers all over the world.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

FDA Science Forum 2015: Views of FDA

FDA’s 2015 Science Forum attracted more than 800 people from the scientific community. Here’s what some attendees said about the innovative research going on at the agency and why FDA can be a valuable collaborator in research aimed at transforming food safety and medical product development. If you couldn’t attend the FDA science forum, you can still see all the presentations on our web site.

FDA Engages Internationally to Promote Access to Safe, Effective Animal Medicines

By: Bettye Walters, D.V.M.

Regulators around the world are reaching across national borders as they work together to ensure the safety of veterinary medical products.

Bettye WaltersI am a veterinarian on the International Programs Team at the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM). In this role, I attended the 4th Global Animal Health Conference in Tanzania on June 24 and 25 and participated in the global dialogue about the use and availability of high quality, safe and effective veterinary medical products in developing countries, especially in Africa. FDA embraces the One Health approach, which recognizes the connection between the health of people, animals and the environment.

I was accompanied by my colleague Steven Vaughn, D.V.M., who heads CVM’s Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation. Dr. Vaughn has years of experience exploring the most effective ways to regulate animal medications to ensure that they are high quality and safe.

The conference was attended by leading figures from the world’s governments, academia, industries, and international organizations and its focus was on the concept of “regulatory convergence,” a process that allows countries to bring their regulatory processes into closer alignment. We tackled important ideas related to promoting market control, including the surveillance of veterinary products on the market and improving access to effective animal drugs. We also discussed fostering systems for mutual recognition of regulatory oversight and standards, forming regional organizations, and implementing African regional harmonization initiatives to create a convergence of international guidelines.

If all countries can agree on the testing and safety of animal drugs, each country could have faster access to new medical products and be able to better leverage often-limited resources. While globalization provides many challenges, FDA believes it also offers opportunities for innovation if regulators, industry, and academia are working together for the benefit of all countries.

It’s a small world and solutions to public health problems, for both people and animals, are increasingly found on the world stage. FDA is committed to working with its global partners to promote cooperation in veterinary medicine.

Bettye Walters, D.V.M., is a veterinary medical officer on the International Programs Team at FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine.

FDA Continues its Collaboration with Canada in Phase 2 of the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council

By: Lou Valdez, M.S.M.

For more than 30 years, FDA has enjoyed a robust partnership with our Canadian regulatory colleagues. In FDA, we are excited to build upon this relationship in Phase 2 of the U.S.–Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC).

Lou ValdezThe RCC was established in 2011 by U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to develop smarter and more efficient and effective approaches to regulatory cooperation between the two countries. The RCC aims to bring the U.S. and Canadian regulators and stakeholders closer in terms of sharing information, combining expertise, eliminating duplicative work and creating an enabling environment to foster and facilitate ideas.

In Phase 1 of the RCC, our governments identified important regulatory issues to work together to improve. For example, as a result of the cooperation between FDA and Health Canada, we reduced the regulatory burden for industry through the development of the Common Electronic Submission Gateway (CESG). Led by our FDA Medical Product Centers, the CESG allows industry to simultaneously submit electronic applications to both FDA and Health Canada for pharmaceutical and biological products.

In Phase 2, over the next three years, FDA has committed to work with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Health Canada in the areas of:

  • Food Safety
  • Medical Devices
  • Over-the-Counter Drug Products
  • Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, and
  • Veterinary Drugs.

Together with CFIA and Health Canada, we developed five individual work plans describing specific activities within the above areas and two Regulatory Partnership Statements outlining the institutional frameworks for this cooperation.

Throughout the implementation of these work plans, American and Canadian stakeholders will have opportunities to engage with the regulatory agencies to provide updates on significant industry and consumer trends and associated implications for regulatory systems.

FDA is committed to continuing our valued partnership with Canada and using the RCC as an important tool upon which to build. Learn more about FDA’s work under the RCC at

Lou Valdez, M.S.M., is FDA’s Associate Commissioner for International Programs

Veterinary Feed Directive Will Protect Both People and Animals

By: Michael R. Taylor

For the past several years, the FDA has been taking steps to fundamentally change how antimicrobials are legally used in food-producing animals. The agency is moving to eliminate the use of these drugs for production purposes – such as speeding weight gain – and bring their remaining therapeutic uses in feed and water under the supervision of licensed veterinarians. These changes are critical to ensuring these drugs are used judiciously and only when necessary for legitimate animal health purposes.

Michael TaylorToday, we added another element to our overall strategy, one that recognizes the important role that veterinarians fulfill as guardians of animal health and preservers of judicious use of medically important antimicrobials. The Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) final rule lays out what veterinarians must do when they need to authorize the use of these products in feed to protect the animals they serve.

This rule is a key piece of FDA’s initiative to combat the overuse of antimicrobial medications — including antibiotics — in both people and animals, which has created a global health crisis. Disease-causing bacteria commonly develop resistance to the medications created to kill them, but misuse of these important treatments ups the ante. FDA is particularly concerned about the use of “medically important” antibiotics in animal agriculture because they are also used to treat human disease and could become useless if bacteria become resistant to their effects.

Of course, change takes time. Since December 2013, we have been implementing a plan with animal drug companies to phase out the use of medically important antibiotics for enhanced food production. We have been working since then with drug companies, animal producers and veterinarians to change how these antibiotics are used in animals that enter the food supply, such as cattle, hogs and poultry.

Partnership and collaboration is delivering results. All 25 affected animal drug companies agreed to work with FDA to remove production uses for growth promotion and feed efficiency from the approved uses of their drug products, and move the therapeutic uses of these products from over-the-counter availability to a marketing status requiring veterinary oversight. By December 2016, we expect to see significant changes in the way medically important antibiotics are used in animal agriculture as compared to how they have been used for decades.

What will this mean in practice? Once these changes are fully implemented, it will be illegal to use these medically important antibiotics for production purposes, period. Instead of having unrestricted over-the-counter access, animal producers will need to obtain authorization from a licensed veterinarian to use these medications for therapeutic uses — for prevention, control or treatment of a specifically identified disease.

The VFD rule respects the diversity of circumstances that veterinarians encounter on the farm, but also ensures that their oversight is in line with nationally consistent principles. They will be required to have sufficient knowledge of the animals being treated by examining them or visiting the facility at which their care is managed.

Specifically, veterinarians play an important role in animal and human health and their oversight, as an integral part of the VFD process, will help ensure that medically important antimicrobial drugs will be used in feed according to label directions and only when appropriate to meet specific animal health needs. That means using a product for a specifically-identified disease, at the right dose, and for the period of time stipulated on the product label.

We aren’t done yet. The next step is getting the data we need on how medically important antibiotics are now being used on farms, information that will be essential to measuring the impact of our judicious use strategy. Right now we collect antibiotic sales and distribution data but do not have explicit regulatory authority to require data to be submitted on how antibiotics are actually being used in farm animals. We are evaluating how to obtain additional detailed information on such things as the species, indication, dose, and duration of use in order to better understand links between usage patterns and trends in antibiotic resistance. This will help provide a more comprehensive and science-based picture of antibiotic use and resistance in animal agriculture. FDA is actively engaged with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and a wide array of stakeholders to fill this need. We plan to hold a public meeting this summer to discuss how to collect and present this data.

Finally, FDA has been actively engaging veterinary organizations, animal producer organizations, and other stakeholders to express concern about some currently-approved preventive, therapeutic uses of medically important antibiotics that have no limit on how long they can be given to the animal. This is not what we consider a judicious use. We believe that veterinarians should work with their clients to explore alternative approaches for managing certain animal health conditions, and we will be working with animal producers and drug companies to make any needed changes in approved conditions of use.

Antimicrobial resistance is everyone’s problem. It requires determination and cooperation to make the changes needed to protect the utility of these life-saving drugs. We are grateful for the way our partners and stakeholders across the food system are responding to this challenge.

Michael R. Taylor is FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine

FDA to Industry: Let’s Increase the Availability of Safe, Effective Animal Drugs

By: Martine Hartogensis, D.V.M.

Just as drugs for people benefit from FDA review to ensure their safety, effectiveness and quality, so do drugs for animals.

Martine HartogensisUnfortunately, this fact is ignored by some companies that sell unapproved animal drugs. By bypassing the FDA’s drug approval process, these firms potentially put the health of animals—and people—at risk. That’s why the FDA is working to get these products off the market.

There are different pathways to FDA approval and legal marketing of an animal drug product, but each pathway requires a drug company to expend both time and financial resources to generate the appropriate scientific evidence to support the approval. Companies that bypass the FDA drug approval process may be endangering the animals given unapproved drugs and people who either handle the unapproved drugs or eat food from animals treated with them. In addition, those who market unapproved drugs have an unfair competitive edge, and might prompt others to also break the law in order to compete in the marketplace. This slippery slope leads to a diminished supply of animal drugs that have been reviewed by the FDA for safety and effectiveness.

FDA’s rigorous review process also makes certain that the manufacturing process preserves the drug’s strength, quality and purity, and ensures that it has been consistently produced from batch to batch. FDA also requires that the product labeling is truthful and complete.

In some circumstances, the unapproved drug may be the only one of its kind available. In these cases, FDA often works with the company to develop the evidence that the product is safe and effective. Making innovative, FDA-approved animal medications legally marketable is an important part of FDA’s mission to protect the public health.

But while being helpful, FDA is also stepping up efforts to combat illegal animal drug sales, both on the ground and online.

We’ve recently issued warning letters to several marketers, distributors and manufacturers of unapproved animal drugs and expect to issue more in the coming year. Our enforcement actions could include seizures of violative products and/or injunctions against manufacturers and distributors of unapproved animal drugs. We also continue to regularly update the agency’s web page on unapproved animal drugs with information for veterinarians and industry.

We’ll continue to do all we can to make the animal drug approval process as straightforward and efficient as possible. But we need industry to do its part, so that we can continue to make more safe and effective drugs available to veterinarians, animal producers and pet owners.

Martine Hartogensis, D.V.M., is Deputy Director, Office of Surveillance and Compliance at FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine