FDA to Industry: Let’s Increase the Availability of Safe, Effective Animal Drugs

By: Martine Hartogensis, D.V.M.

Just as drugs for people benefit from FDA review to ensure their safety, effectiveness and quality, so do drugs for animals.

Martine HartogensisUnfortunately, this fact is ignored by some companies that sell unapproved animal drugs. By bypassing the FDA’s drug approval process, these firms potentially put the health of animals—and people—at risk. That’s why the FDA is working to get these products off the market.

There are different pathways to FDA approval and legal marketing of an animal drug product, but each pathway requires a drug company to expend both time and financial resources to generate the appropriate scientific evidence to support the approval. Companies that bypass the FDA drug approval process may be endangering the animals given unapproved drugs and people who either handle the unapproved drugs or eat food from animals treated with them. In addition, those who market unapproved drugs have an unfair competitive edge, and might prompt others to also break the law in order to compete in the marketplace. This slippery slope leads to a diminished supply of animal drugs that have been reviewed by the FDA for safety and effectiveness.

FDA’s rigorous review process also makes certain that the manufacturing process preserves the drug’s strength, quality and purity, and ensures that it has been consistently produced from batch to batch. FDA also requires that the product labeling is truthful and complete.

In some circumstances, the unapproved drug may be the only one of its kind available. In these cases, FDA often works with the company to develop the evidence that the product is safe and effective. Making innovative, FDA-approved animal medications legally marketable is an important part of FDA’s mission to protect the public health.

But while being helpful, FDA is also stepping up efforts to combat illegal animal drug sales, both on the ground and online.

We’ve recently issued warning letters to several marketers, distributors and manufacturers of unapproved animal drugs and expect to issue more in the coming year. Our enforcement actions could include seizures of violative products and/or injunctions against manufacturers and distributors of unapproved animal drugs. We also continue to regularly update the agency’s web page on unapproved animal drugs with information for veterinarians and industry.

We’ll continue to do all we can to make the animal drug approval process as straightforward and efficient as possible. But we need industry to do its part, so that we can continue to make more safe and effective drugs available to veterinarians, animal producers and pet owners.

Martine Hartogensis, D.V.M., is Deputy Director, Office of Surveillance and Compliance at FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine

A Year of Significant Progress in Public Health

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.A new year offers both an opportunity to look forward and an opportunity to reflect on the achievements of the previous year. And, in 2014, FDA’s accomplishments were substantial, touching on many of the agency’s broad responsibilities to protect and promote the public health.

Whether our achievements involved medical product safety and innovation, food safety and nutrition, tobacco control, or other areas of our important work, all were accomplished thanks in large part to our ability to respond to evolving needs and opportunities including the embrace of new approvals, technologies and cutting-edge science.

Consider these highlights:

Drug Approvals: This past calendar year, FDA approved 51 novel drugs and biologics (41 by CDER and 10 by CBER), the most in almost 20 years. Among CDER’s 2014 approvals are treatments for cancer, hepatitis C and type-2 diabetes, as well as the most new drugs for “orphan” diseases since Congress enacted the Orphan Drug Act over 30 years ago. Seventeen of these new approvals are “first in class” therapies, which represent new approaches in the treatment of disease. In addition, CBER approved many important biological products in 2014, including a number of groundbreaking vaccines for meningitis B, the flu, and certain types of Human Papillomavirus, the latter of which is expected to prevent approximately 90 percent of the cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers caused by HPV.

These developments are a testament not just to our expanding understanding of human biology, the biology of disease and the molecular mechanisms that drive the disease process, but also to FDA’s innovative approaches to help expedite development and review of medical products that target unmet medical needs, while adhering to the established standards for safety and efficacy. These include enhanced guidance to shape the research and development agenda, early input on clinical study needs and design, expedited review programs, targeted regulatory advice and other tools and incentives that spur investment and innovation in new medical products to address unmet medical needs.

Opioids: This past year FDA took several actions to address the abuse of opioid drugs. First, we approved abuse deterrent labeling for three opioid products that are designed to deter prescription drug abuse. These drugs used different technologies to combat the abuse problem in different ways, such as by making the product resistant to crushing or dissolving or using “aversive technology” to discourage users from taking more than the approved dosage of the drug. To help encourage the development of more drugs in abuse-deterrent forms, we are also working to provide additional advice to manufacturers. Although abuse-deterrent opioid drugs are not a silver bullet to prevent opioid abuse, we believe that our work in this area will give physicians effective new treatment options with less risk of abuse.

FDA also worked to improve the treatment of patients who overdose on opioids. We approved a new dosage form of naloxone, with an autoinjector to enable a caregiver to administer the drug in the emergency treatment of opioid overdose (as it rapidly reverses the effects of an overdose). While we continue to support development in this area, this approval offers a new valuable tool to help prevent the tragedy of opioid drug overdose.

Antibiotic Resistance: We made important strides in confronting the growing resistance of some bacteria to antimicrobial drugs. Our efforts, which are a critical part of the recently unveiled National Strategy on Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, offer a multi-pronged approach that recognizes that to effectively address this challenge means simultaneously addressing the many different causes for increasing antibiotic resistance. One important response has been efforts to expand the pipeline of new medical products, including therapeutics to treat and cure infection, diagnostics to aid in the identification of the cause of infection and of resistant infections, and vaccines to help prevent infection with bacteria in the first place.

These efforts are already having an impact. In 2014, FDA approved four novel systemic antibiotics. In contrast, only five new antibiotics had been approved in the previous ten year period.

In addition to working on the human medical product side, we also developed and, over the next two years will be implementing, an important complementary strategy to eliminate the use of medically important antibiotics for growth promotion in food-producing animals. This strategy, once fully implemented, also will bring the remaining uses of such drugs to treat, control or prevent disease in these animals under the oversight of veterinarians. All 26 animal health companies who produce those drugs have committed to participate, and 31 products already have been withdrawn from the market.

Pharmacy Compounding: We continued to respond effectively to the 2012 outbreak of fungal meningitis that was linked to contaminated compounded drugs. This included conducting more than 90 inspections of compounding facilities across the nation in the past year. As a result, numerous firms that engaged in poor sterile practices stopped making sterile drugs, and many firms recalled drugs that have been made under substandard conditions. Where appropriate, we have worked with the Department of Justice to pursue enforcement action against some of these facilities.

We also have continued to implement the compounding provisions of the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA), and to develop and implement policies to address compounding by state-licensed pharmacies and the new category of registered outsourcing facilities.

Food Safety: Over the past year, the Agency has made great strides in implementing the landmark FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Through our proposed rules for preventive controls requirements for both human and animal food, standards for produce safety, foreign supplier verification programs, third party auditor accreditation, focused mitigation strategies to prevent intentional adulteration of food aimed at causing large-scale public health harm, and requirements for sanitary transportation practices to ensure the safe transport of food, we are working to ensure the safety of American consumers related to the foods they eat.

Nutrition: Good health depends not just on food safety, but also on what we choose to eat. FDA plays an important role in promoting good nutrition and healthy food choices by helping consumers understand the importance and benefits of good nutrition – and of being able to make informed choices about what we eat.

New rules in 2014 to finalize requiring calorie information on restaurant menus and vending machines give our citizens information they need to make healthy food choices and hopefully help reduce the epidemic of obesity in the United States. We also proposed changes to the familiar “Nutrition Facts” label on packaged foods which, when finalized, will give our citizens updated nutrition information, reflecting the most current nutrition science, to help them make healthy choices when purchasing packaged foods.

Tobacco Control: There are few areas that have as profound an impact on public health as tobacco products, which is why, five years ago, Congress gave FDA the responsibility to oversee the manufacture, marketing, distribution, and sale of tobacco products.

Over the past year, we worked with state authorities to conduct more than 124,000 inspections of retailers to enforce the ban on the sale of tobacco products to children. We unveiled the first of its kind national public education campaign—The Real Cost—to reduce youth smoking. And we took the first steps towards extending the agency’s tobacco product authority over additional products such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, waterpipe (hookah) tobacco, and dissolvables not already subject to such authority through our proposed “Deeming Rule.” In addition, as part of ongoing work on product review decisions, eleven tobacco products that were allowed to enter the market during a provisional period established by the Tobacco Control Act were found “not substantially equivalent” to a predicate tobacco product. As a result of this finding, these products can no longer be sold or distributed in interstate commerce or imported into the United States.

Ebola: The tragic Ebola epidemic in West Africa demonstrates that we do not have the luxury of closing our eyes – or our borders – to the public health problems that exist in the rest of the world. I’m proud that FDA has played an important role in the response to this disease, working closely with colleagues in our government as well as the scientific community, industry and a range of other organizations and nations. We have helped facilitate the development, testing, manufacture, and availability of investigational products for use in diagnosing, treating and preventing Ebola, and worked with sponsors and health care providers to facilitate access to these products as clinical circumstances warrant. In August 2014, FDA designated the drug Z-Mapp as an orphan drug for Ebola, with the hope that this would incentivize further development and study.

And I’m very pleased to report that FDA is represented on the ground in West Africa by dedicated officers of the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service who continue to staff and operate the Monrovia Medical Unit in Liberia that was built to treat the health workers who became ill responding to the outbreak. Like everything FDA does, both at home and abroad, our actions on Ebola represent our agency’s continuing commitment to health and safety, and the use of science to advance these important goals.

I am extremely proud of our accomplishments in 2014, and I am confident that FDA will have a successful 2015, as we continue our work to protect and promote the public health.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration

FDA’s FY 2016 Budget Request

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.FDA oversees products that represent more than 20 cents of every dollar that American consumers spend. Today, FDA presented its FY 2016 budget to Congress.This sensible budget request will help ensure that FDA can continue to fulfill its vast responsibilities to protect the public health, safety, and quality of life of the American public.

I want to share the cover letter that I wrote to Congress outlining some of our specific proposals.

 

Letter from the Commissioner

I am pleased to present the FY 2016 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Budget.

FDA fulfills its important mission to promote and protect health in an increasingly complex and globalized world in many ways.  The scope of our work includes assuring that foods are safe, wholesome, sanitary and properly labeled; ensuring that human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products, and medical devices intended for human use are safe and effective; and regulating tobacco products.  We also play a lead role in protecting the public from electronic product radiation and assuring that cosmetics and dietary supplements are safe and properly labeled.  Finally, we have devoted – and will continue to devote – substantial resources to advancing the public health by helping to speed product innovations.

FDA’s responsibilities continue to expand as we work to fulfill the mandates of groundbreaking legislation passed in recent years, including the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) of 2011, the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012, and the Drug Quality and Security Act of 2013.  Further, with so many FDA-regulated products manufactured in whole or in part outside of our borders, FDA is keenly focused on the complexities of regulating in a global marketplace.

In FY 2014, we took important steps to finalize a key set of proposed food safety rules; worked to improve the safety of compounded pharmaceutical products by conducting more than 90 inspections and implementing compounding legislation through proposed regulations, guidances, and other actions; published the “deeming rule” to extend FDA’s tobacco authority; and collaborated with federal, international, and industry partners to expedite the development and availability of medical products.  In addition, FDA has worked intensively to respond to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa by facilitating the development and availability of investigational diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines with the potential to help combat the epidemic.

FDA continues to seek new ways to obtain the most public health value for the federal dollar as we implement expanded authorities.  The products that FDA regulates are essential to public health, safety, and quality of life and represent over 20 cents of every consumer dollar spent on products in the United States.  Yet, in terms of our FDA budget, each American taxpayer contributes approximately $8 per year for the vast array of protections and services provided by FDA.

In FY 2016, we are requesting essential and timely resources to address critical food and medical product safety issues.  Mindful of the fiscal environment, we have identified targeted reductions where possible and identified long-term needs for additional user fees to balance budget authority growth.  FDA is requesting a total of $4.9 billion to support our various mandates to protect the American people.  This includes a $148 million budget authority increase to focus on the following:

  • delivering a farm-to-table system of prevention, including improved oversight of imported foods, through effectively implementing the final rules required by FSMA;
  • combating the growing threat of antibiotic resistance – in which drugs become less effective, or ineffective, against harmful bacteria;
  • promoting the development and appropriate use of reliable molecular and genetic diagnostics – precision medicine tools – to “personalize” the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease;
  • implementing key FDASIA requirements to improve medical product review and inspections;
  • addressing the safety of compounded drugs;
  • continuing implementation of new requirements for review of sunscreen ingredients under the Sunscreen Innovation Act; and
  • supporting modern facilities to provide the laboratories and office space needed to meet FDA’s expanded legislative mandates.

As a science-based regulatory agency with a public health mission, FDA plays a unique and essential role in promoting and protecting public health and safety.  We are committed to meeting the needs and expectations of the American people.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Commissioner of Food and Drugs

Regulatory Science Collaborations Support Emergency Preparedness

By: Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S.

Scientists love a challenge. And coordinating government agencies, healthcare providers, and numerous additional partners to protect public health in emergency situations is definitely a challenge.

Jean Hu-Primmer

Jean Hu-Primmer, Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA’s Medical Countermeasures Initiative (MCMi) is working with federal agencies (through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise), product developers, healthcare professionals, and researchers, among other partners, to help translate cutting-edge science and technology into safe, effective medical countermeasures. Through these collaborations, MCMi supports research to help develop solutions to complex regulatory science challenges.

Data are critical to help FDA evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medical countermeasures—products that can save lives—during public health emergencies. But collecting data in the midst of an emergency is exceptionally challenging. Working with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), FDA is teaming with critical care physicians nationwide to help address these challenges.

Under a contract awarded last month, FDA and BARDA will work with the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group (USCIITG) to gather important information about medical countermeasures used during public health emergencies. Physicians will help address challenges with collecting and sharing data rapidly in emergencies, including streamlining electronic case reporting for clinical trials and rapidly disseminating key findings to FDA and other stakeholders to support clinical decision-making.

During this four-year project, USCIITG will also develop and pre-position a simple influenza treatment protocol in 10 hospitals throughout the U.S. during the 2015-2016 influenza season. The project will help doctors more easily use an investigational treatment protocol for patients with severe influenza, and test the data collection and reporting system during peak times. The goal is to help streamline the process during future influenza seasons and emergencies.

When it is not ethical or feasible to test the effectiveness of products in humans—such as countermeasures for potential bioterror agents—products may be approved under the Animal Rule. When products are approved under the Animal Rule, FDA requires additional studies, called phase 4 clinical trials, to confirm safety and effectiveness. In addition to the MCMi work, BARDA is funding USCIITG to investigate conducting phase 4 clinical studies during public health emergencies. USCIITG partners will train on these protocols, have them reviewed through their Institutional Review Boards (a requirement for all human studies), and create plans for enactment. USCIITG will then conduct an annual exercise to test these plans, a unique approach to broader science preparedness.

MCMi has also recently awarded regulatory science contracts to support other aspects of emergency preparedness, including two projects to investigate decontamination and reuse of respirators in public health emergencies (awarded to Battelle and Applied Research Associates, Inc.), and an award to support appropriate public use of medical countermeasures through effective emergency communication.

Our work involves big challenges. Through regulatory science, and through new and expanding collaborations, we continue to address these challenges to better prepare our nation to use medical countermeasures in emergencies.

Want to help? We’re currently accepting submissions for additional research to support medical countermeasure preparedness. If you have an idea for a new medical countermeasure regulatory science collaboration, we’d love to hear from you.

You can also visit BARDA’s MCM Procurements and Grants page for more information.

Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S., is Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA’s Program Alignment Addresses New Regulatory Challenges

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Over the last year, a group of senior FDA leaders, under my direction, were tasked to develop plans to modify FDA’s functions and processes in order to address new regulatory challenges. Among these challenges are: the increasing breadth and complexity of FDA’s mandate; the impact of globalization on the food and medical product supply chains; and the ongoing trend of rapid scientific innovation and increased biomedical discovery.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.The Directorates, Centers and the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) have collaborated closely to define the changes needed to align ourselves more strategically and operationally and meet the greater demands placed on the agency. As a result, each regulatory program has established detailed action plans. Specifically, each plan describes the steps in transitioning to commodity-based and vertically-integrated regulatory programs in the following areas: human and veterinary drugs; biological products; medical devices and radiological health; bioresearch monitoring (BIMO); food and feed; and tobacco.

These action plans focus on what will be accomplished in FY 2015 and outline the need to develop detailed future plans for the next five years in some cases. The plans represent what each Center and ORA have agreed are the critical actions to jointly fulfill FDA’s mission in the key areas of specialization, training, work planning, compliance policy and enforcement strategy, imports, laboratory optimization, and information technology.

Because each Center has a unique regulatory program to manage, there are understandably variations among the plans. However, there are also common features across most of the plans: the need to define specialization across our inspection and compliance functions; to identify competencies in these areas of specialization and develop appropriate training curricula; to develop risk-based work planning that is aligned with program priorities and improves accountability; and to develop clear and current compliance policies and enforcement strategies.

Below are some highlights from the plans that illustrate these features:

  • Establish Senior Executive Program Directors in ORA. In the past, for example, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) would work with several ORA units responsible for the pharmaceutical program. Now, the Centers will have a single Senior Executive in ORA responsible for each commodity program, allowing ORA and the Centers to resolve matters more efficiently.
  • Jointly develop new inspection approaches. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and ORA plan, for example, will begin to focus some inspections on characteristics and features of medical devices most critical to patient safety and device effectiveness. ORA investigators will perform these inspections utilizing jointly developed training.
  • Invest in expanded training across ORA and the Centers. The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) and ORA will jointly develop a biologics training curriculum, redesign investigator certification, and cross-train Center and ORA investigators, compliance officers and managers.
  • Expand compliance tools. Field investigators will be teamed with subject matter experts from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and the Center for Veterinary Medicine to make decisions in real time, working with firms to achieve prompt correction of food safety deficiencies and to help implement the preventive approaches outlined by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). If industry does not quickly and adequately correct critical areas of noncompliance that could ultimately result in food borne outbreaks, we will use our enforcement tools, including those provided under FSMA, as appropriate.
  • Optimize FDA laboratories. ORA and the various Centers will establish a multi-year strategic plan for ORA scientific laboratory work, including hiring and training analysts, purchasing and using equipment, and allocating resources and facilities. At the same time, ORA is committed to conducting an ongoing review of its labs to ensure that they are properly managed and operating as efficiently as possible.
  • Create specialized investigators, compliance officers, and first-line managers. A bioresearch monitoring (BIMO) working group is developing a plan for a dedicated corps of ORA investigators to conduct BIMO inspections, and a dedicated cadre of tobacco investigators is being established.

Working together to implement these action plans will take time, commitment, and continued investment and we’ll need to monitor and evaluate our efforts. These plans will help us implement the new FSMA rules announced in September, as well as the Agency’s new medical product quality initiatives under the FDA Safety and Innovation Act and Drug Quality and Security Act.

FDA’s Program Alignment is a well-thought out approach that responds to the needs of a changing world. I look forward to the ways in which these action plans will ultimately enhance the FDA’s public health and regulatory mission.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA’s New Roadmap for Progress: Strategic Priorities 2014-2018

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates products that represent about 20 cents of every dollar American consumers spend on products. This includes the safety and effectiveness of drugs, medical devices, and vaccines, the safety of blood supply to food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that emit radiation, and more recently, tobacco. This fact can be easy to gloss over, but if one pauses for a moment to reflect on this fact, it is clear that the FDA’s regulatory role is large and truly meaningful to all of our everyday lives.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.When the FDA was first established, our regulated industries were predominantly local, the volume of imported products was low, and even the movement of goods across country was minimal. But times have changed, and so have the strategies we employ to address those changes. Over the last five years alone, the FDA’s regulatory portfolio has increased to now include regulating tobacco products, developing a new global system for protecting food safety, and addressing challenges created by the global expansion of research, commerce and trade.

In fact, more often than not today, a drug or medical product that ends up on the shelves of an American drugstore or in our hospitals will come, at least in part, from some foreign source. Nearly 40 percent of finished medicines that Americans now take are made elsewhere, as are about 50 percent of all medical devices. Approximately 80 percent of the manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients used in the United States are located outside our borders.

These and other new challenges and transformative developments in global science, technology and trade are rapidly altering the environment in which we work to fulfill our broad public health mission. In order to continue to carry out that mission, we need a set of clearly defined priorities and goals, as well as the strategies for reaching them. Therefore, I am pleased to announce the release of a revised set of FDA Strategic Priorities which will guide the agency in how we continue to promote and protect the health of the American public.

The new Strategic Priorities document sets the path for our Agency over the next four years. It establishes a framework for integrating our five strategic priorities – regulatory science, globalization, safety and quality, smart regulation, and stewardship.

Although each priority is significant in and of itself, the priorities are also interconnected and must not be addressed in isolation. In addition, this new roadmap sets forth FDA’s core mission goals and objectives, such as improving and safeguarding access to the products FDA regulates – and promoting better informed decisions about their use.

The Strategic Plan has been in development for more than a year and was created by a hard-working team of talented and knowledgeable FDA employees representing programs from across the agency. While this team drove the Plan’s creation, it is backed by the commitment of all of us at the FDA. My hope is that these priorities, which will be repeatedly cited in our speeches, policies and writings, will serve as our foundational guidepost, providing the strategic direction to help the agency continue to provide the level of service and protection the American people deserve.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA’s Take on the Executive Order and National Strategy to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D.

Few issues in public health today are as critical and time urgent as combating the growing threat of antibiotic resistance. We are delighted to stand with the White House in the development and response to the President’s Executive Order and the National Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (CARB) Strategy. Fighting antibiotic resistance is both a public health and national security priority. FDA has played a key role in the development of this important effort, and we already have made strides on many fronts to make sure that we have effective antibiotics for the future.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.Antibiotics are precious medicines that have saved millions of lives by treating infections caused by bacteria. But their misuse, and overuse, has serious health consequences and has contributed to antibiotic resistance—in which these drugs become less effective, or ineffective, against harmful bacteria.

The consequences of antibiotic resistance must not be underestimated. With each passing day, concern mounts that more patients will have few or no therapeutic options because of resistance to available therapies. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that each year at least 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths in the United States are caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

It is a high priority for FDA to work with our partners to find solutions for this serious public health problem.

To address the need for effective antibiotics, FDA is working hard to ensure development of new strategies. These include vaccines to help prevent infection with bacteria in the first place; devices to aid in the accurate diagnosis of the cause of infection and of resistant infections; and new drugs to treat patients with serious infections for whom we have few, or no, treatment options because of resistance to currently available antibiotics.

We have been engaging with outside groups to advance the science of clinical trials. For instance, we have worked with the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative on increasing the efficiency of clinical trials; with the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at the Brookings Institution to address overarching issues in antibiotic development, such as the major technical and financial barriers; and with the Biomarkers Consortium of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on endpoints for studying antibiotics in clinical trials. In fact, we recently joined NIH to hold a workshop to examine the technical challenges related to antibacterial product development and to discuss innovative regulatory and clinical trial approaches for bringing new products to market. (The final agenda and presentations are available online.)

FDA also has been actively implementing the Generating Antibiotics Incentives Now (GAIN) Act, a provision within the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) to promote the development of antibacterial and antifungal drugs. To date, FDA has granted 57 Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designations under GAIN to 39 different unique molecules. Antibiotics that have a QIDP designation receive, upon request, priority review, typically shaving four months off review times, and fast track designation, which results in early consultation, including on clinical trial design, between FDA and antibiotic sponsors. QIDPs also can receive an additional five years of marketing exclusivity in addition to existing exclusivity periods at the time of approval. We’re pleased that already three QIDP designated antibacterial drugs have been approved in the past few months: Dalbavancin in May 2014, Tedizolid Phosphate in June 2014 and Oritavancin in August 2014.

Furthermore, FDA promotes the appropriate and responsible use of antibiotics in clinical medicine. Antibiotic labels contain information for health care professionals and patients on appropriate use. And we work to improve the integrity of the global supply chain for pharmaceutical products to minimize the chance of a patient receiving a substandard drug, which in some instances could promote antimicrobial resistance.

In addition, FDA has developed—and is working to implement—two strategies to ensure the judicious use of medically important antimicrobial drugs in food-producing animals. This is a vital step to better protect antibiotic effectiveness for both human and animal populations. Accordingly, we asked the manufacturers of these antibiotics used in food-producing animals to remove all growth promotion indications. Once their labels have been changed, the products can no longer be used legally for growth promotion purposes, or without veterinary oversight. We have now secured the commitment of all 26 affected animal health companies, and 31 products have been withdrawn from the market. Two other companies have implemented label changes and we will be working with the other companies to make sure that they do so as well. The second track will ensure that all remaining therapeutic uses of the affected medically important antibiotics in food-producing animals will take place under the supervision of a veterinarian. The agency continues to work under a three-year transition period, and we remain encouraged by the process.

A successful strategy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria will require effort and input from all involved groups, including from health care professionals and patients themselves. For our part, FDA continues to work with government partners, product developers and the scientific community as well as other critical stakeholders to address the unique and complex regulatory, scientific and policy challenges associated with this public health issue. The Executive Order and CARB strategy announced today will clearly boost our and the nation’s efforts to meet these challenges more effectively.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA Researchers Build Partnerships to Advance Innovations

By: David G. White, Ph.D.

Last week, FDA scientists and researchers presented more than 160 abstracts at the 4th Annual Food and Drug Administration Foods and Veterinary Medicine Science and Research Conference:  that’s more than 160 research projects focused on protecting the health of people and animals. The presentations and posters at the conference were shared among approximately 300 FDA researchers and other staff members who came to hear the latest on our science and research accomplishments.

David White and Heather Tate discuss poster

Heather Tate, author of “NARMS investigation of an increase in Salmonella serotype IIIa 18:z4,z23:- isolated from retail meats and humans,” discussing her poster with David G. White, Ph.D., Chief Science Officer and Research Director, FDA Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine, at the 4th Annual FDA Foods and Veterinary Medicine Science and Research Conference. See more photos of this event on Flickr.

FDA research in the food and veterinary medicine arena covers many different fields of study, from foodborne pathogens to nanotechnology, food allergens, dietary supplements and much more. For example, research is being conducted to improve detection methods for numerous microbial pathogens and chemical hazards that may contaminate the foods you and your pets eat. The diverse research portfolio of this conference showcased all the advancements in science and technology that the FDA is investing in to protect the health of people and animals.

The research presented was the highlight of the conference, but we are making equally important advancements as an organization. We have come very far in terms of our communication and collaboration among foods, cosmetics, and animal health researchers across different components of the FDA. There are so many parts of FDA involved in these areas of research that our top priority is to be sure we are working together and using our resources strategically. We must make sure our projects are more than just interesting – they must be focused on our highest public health priorities.

One of the major themes of the conference was that partnerships are critical to fostering innovation. This was emphasized by Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine Mike Taylor, who noted in his opening remarks the terrific effort of everyone who worked on the Whole Genome Sequencing project – a major undertaking that was recently a finalist and a Secretary’s Pick for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Innovates award.

FDA Science and Research Conference

Tammy Barnaba, author of “Surveillance of Probiotic Ingredients in Dietary Supplements and Microbial Variations Between Product Lots,” explaining data from her poster to Laurenda Carter, another attendee, at the 4th Annual FDA Foods and Veterinary Medicine Science and Research Conference. See more photos of this event on Flickr.

This project was launched to showcase the capacity of this technology to revolutionize foodborne disease tracking, and it was a true collaboration among many laboratories within FDA (Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and Office of Regulatory Affairs), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS).

One of the goals of our Whole Genome Sequencing initiative is to further develop and roll out a pathogen detection network called the GenomeTrakr, which would store genomic data of common foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella and Listeria. This data would enable FDA scientists to determine the exact order of the molecules in an organism’s genetic material, information which can then be used to identify specific strains of bacteria or viruses in foods that are causing illness. Once the strains are identified, scientists from FDA, CDC, USDA and the various states can quickly and efficiently trace the strain back to the origin of contamination so that we can improve the safety of our food supply and protect people from becoming ill.

As Dr. Eric Brown, the director of FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) Division of Microbiology in the Office of Regulatory Science, explains: “What genome sequencing allows us to do with food traceback is unprecedented. It’s like upgrading from an old backyard telescope to the Hubble.”

The projects presented at this year’s conference highlight the progress we have made, and the progress we want to continue to make, to expand our partnerships beyond FDA and our sister agencies, such as CDC and USDA, into academia and the private sector.

It’s exciting to see the headway we are making and the commitment of our researchers to protect and promote the health of humans and animals.

David G. White, Ph.D., is Chief Science Officer and Research Director, FDA Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine

See more photos of this event on Flickr.

Keeping You Informed: An Update on FDA’s Judicious Use Strategy for Antimicrobial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals

By: David G. White, Ph.D.

Today, “antibiotic resistance” is a widely recognized concern. With the rise of bacteria that are resistant to many, and in some cases, all standard treatments, scientists and medical professionals are not alone in focusing on this problem. The general public is increasingly aware of the ongoing research and how antibiotic resistance can affect their immediate communities.

David WhiteAntibiotic or antimicrobial resistance is an extremely complex and challenging phenomenon that is driven by many factors. For example, bacteria can spontaneously mutate to become resistant to antimicrobials, even ones they’ve never previously been exposed to. Overuse in both humans and animals is another complicating factor. Although progress has been made in curbing inappropriate drug uses in human and veterinary medicine, more work is clearly needed.

In December 2013, FDA started the clock on major changes regarding the use of antimicrobials in food producing animals by asking the animal pharmaceutical industry to relabel certain antimicrobials used in feed in two ways: by removing those indications approved for “growth production/feed efficiency,” and by requiring veterinary oversight and involvement in order to obtain these products when they are needed to assure animal health.

We’re now six months into a three-year transition period for these actions to take place, and we’re happy to report that we’ve secured the voluntary engagement of all 26 affected animal health companies. Out of the 283 drug products, 31 have been withdrawn from the market completely, and partial label changes have been completed for two other products.

Today we released our first biannual progress report on this strategy. FDA has committed to keeping the public updated on the implementation of these changes, and we intend to release progress reports every six months. These reports will highlight changes made by drug companies to their products over the previous six months, and provide a summary of changes that are in progress.

FDA will continue to update its chart of affected applications in real time as companies make label changes.

Developing strategies for reducing antimicrobial resistance is critical for protecting both human and animal health. We are still in the early stages of implementing this part of our overall effort to slow the development of antimicrobial resistance. We’ve been working with drug companies to move this strategy forward, and we are in continual discussions with both the animal health and animal production industries to help identify the most efficient ways to make these changes to their products.

While these changes are significant steps forward, the strategy is still in its early stages. The changes are just one part of FDA’s overall strategy for monitoring and reducing antimicrobial resistance. We see these progress reports as a way to evaluate the impact of our measures on how medically important antimicrobials are used in food producing animals, but we also know there’s more work to do. Additional actions may be warranted in the future, and FDA will be continually assessing their impact to determine appropriate next steps.

As we move forward, FDA is working with federal partners, veterinary groups, and consumer advocates to develop additional ways to measure success in slowing the development of antibiotic resistance and preserving the effectiveness of existing antimicrobial drugs. As with any strategy, there will be additional challenges, but FDA remains committed to addressing them and sharing what we learn along the way.

David G. White, Ph.D., is the chief science officer and research director in FDA’s Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine

OpenFDA: Innovative Initiative Opens Door to Wealth of FDA’s Publicly Available Data

By: Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S.

Today, I am pleased to announce the launch of openFDA, a new initiative from our Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation (OITI). OpenFDA is specifically designed to make it easier for web developers, researchers, and the public to access and use the many large, important, health data sets collected by the agency.

Taha Kass-HoutThese publicly available data sets, once successfully integrated and analyzed, can provide knowledge and insights that cannot be gained from any other single source.

Consider the 3 million plus reports of drug adverse reactions or medication errors submitted to FAERS, the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (previously AERS), since 2004.

Researchers, scientists, software developers, and other technically-focused individuals in both the private and public sectors have always been invited to mine that publicly available data set – and others – to educate consumers, which in turn can further our regulatory or scientific missions, and ultimately, save lives.

But obtaining this information hasn’t always been easy.

In the past, these vast datasets could be difficult for industry to access and to use.  Pharmaceutical companies, for example, send hundreds of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to FDA every year because that has been one of the ways they could get this data. Other methods called for downloading large amounts of files encoded in a variety of formats or not fully documented, or using a website to point-and-click and browse through a database – all slow and labor-intensive processes.

openFDA logoOpenFDA will make our publicly available data accessible in a structured, computer-readable format. It provides a “search-based” Application Programming Interface – the set of requirements that govern how one software application can talk to another – that makes it possible to find both structured and unstructured content online.

Software developers can now build their own applications (such as a mobile phone app or an interactive website) that can quickly search, query or pull massive amounts of public information instantaneously and directly from FDA datasets in real time on an “as-needed” basis. Additionally, with this approach, applications can be built on one common platform that is free and open to use. Publicly available data provided through openFDA are in the public domain with a CC0 Public Domain Dedication.

Drug adverse events is the first dataset – with reports submitted from 2004 through 2013 available now.

Using this data, a mobile developer could create a search app for a smart phone, for example, which a consumer could then use to determine whether anyone else has experienced the same adverse event they did after taking a certain drug.

As we focus on making existing public data more easily accessible, and providing appropriate documentation and examples to developers, it’s important to note that we will not release any data that could be used to identify individuals or reveal other private information.

OpenFDA uses cutting-edge technologies deployed on FDA’s new Public Cloud Computing infrastructure enabled by OITI, and will serve as a pilot for how FDA can interact internally and with external stakeholders, spur innovation, and develop or use novel applications securely and efficiently. As we move forward with the early stages of openFDA, we will be listening closely to the public, researchers, industry and all other users for their feedback on how to make openFDA even more useful in promoting and protecting the public health.

Taha A. Kass-Hout, M.D., M.S., is FDA’s Chief Health Informatics Officer and Director of FDA’s Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation.