Have a Problem? Contact the New Ombudsman in the Office of Regulatory Affairs

By: Melinda K. Plaisier

Melinda PlaisierWhether we are inspecting your facilities, sampling your products, or conducting investigations, the primary goal of FDA’s Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA) is to protect the public. But I understand the impact our actions can have on you, so I am committed to making ORA’s processes as transparent as possible and quickly addressing problems you may encounter.

That’s why I’m happy to announce a new resource: an ORA ombudsman who can help you with unresolved concerns. While you may continue to bring issues to my staff, Ombudsman Jessica Zeller is dedicated solely to helping you with assessing and resolving problems.

Jessica, who has worked in both industry and government, understands that FDA’s perspective is often different from that of industry and other stakeholders. Her experience makes her an ideal candidate to carry out two primary objectives:

  • To informally and in an unbiased manner, find solutions, when possible, to problems that arise with our external partners, including industry, other governmental agencies, and consumers.
  • To improve communications between ORA employees and stakeholders through outreach and education, helping both sides become more aware of each other’s needs.

“Understanding the pressures that each side faces are critical to working out solutions and allaying fears,” says Jessica. “I intend to hear what you are saying and feel what you are feeling. I will not always be able to get you what you want, but I promise you will have an opportunity to share your concerns, and I will attempt to achieve the best solution possible.”

Although Jessica reports directly to me, and ORA leaders will continue to make final decisions, Jessica is an unbiased third party who will consider and work on your concerns. You may contact her by phone or email, and she will keep conversations as confidential as possible within the limits of the law.

Jessica gained her expert knowledge from more than a decade of work in FDA regulation. During her eight-year tenure at FDA, from 2004 to 2013, she served in the Office of the Chief Counsel and as deputy director of the Office of Compliance and Enforcement in the Center for Tobacco Products. From 2013 until she returned to FDA late last year, Jessica was in-house counsel for Proctor & Gamble. She also previously worked as a congressional staffer, earned a law degree and a master’s degree in bioethics from the University of Virginia, and a bachelor’s degree in biology.

The International Ombudsman Institute defines an ombudsman as a person of prestige and influence who operates with objectivity, competence, efficiency, and fairness. We are proud that Jessica fits that lofty definition so well. I encourage you to reach out to her when issues remain unresolved.

Melinda K. Plaisier is FDA’s Associate Commissioner of Regulatory Affairs

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