Advancing Women’s Health Research

By: Pamela E. Scott, Ph.D.

Career inspiration can come from many sources. My inspiration came from a broken ankle.

Pamela ScottIn the winter of 1999, I broke several bones and had three surgeries to repair my ankle. While working with my doctors on my treatment plan, I had to make some serious decisions about the proposed medical devices that would be used in my care.

I had more information at my fingertips than the average person. I was an FDA insider who had worked on medical devices. I had worked as a statistical reviewer, and I was in the process of completing my PhD in epidemiology and clinical trials methodology. But despite my background and access to information, I still had questions about how well the devices work for women like me.

My experience motivated me to make sure that women have the data and information they need to make informed choices about their medical care. When I returned to FDA, I dedicated my efforts to promoting women’s health research. Years later, I continue this work in my current role as Deputy Director and Director of Research and Development for the FDA Office of Women’s Health (OWH).

Throughout its history, FDA has conducted research to help inform its regulatory and policy decisions. OWH and FDA Centers have supported research that has developed new methods and tools that can help predict the safety and efficacy of FDA-regulated products, identify sex differences, and guide product labeling.

Since its establishment in 1994, the OWH Research and Development Program has played an integral role in promoting sound policies and regulations by supporting research projects, workshops, and training to help FDA answer regulatory questions related to women’s health. OWH has funded more than 300 research projects that have expanded our understanding of the science of women’s health.

New Women’s Health Research Roadmap

To build upon these projects, OWH recently released a Women’s Health Research Roadmap that outlines seven broad areas where new or enhanced regulatory science research would be beneficial to women’s health. Future OWH-funded research will seek to:

  1. Advance Safety and Efficacy
  2. Improve Clinical Study Design and Analyses
  3. Identify Novel Modeling and Simulation Approaches
  4. Advance Biomarker Science
  5. Expand Postmarket Data Sources and Analysis
  6. Improve Health Communications
  7. Identify Sex Differences related to Emerging Technologies.

OWH will work with FDA Centers to increase collaboration and communication on research endeavors related to women’s health. By promoting collaborative research in mission critical areas, the Roadmap will better position FDA to foster the advancement of innovative products that promote and protect the health of all Americans.

While I may never be able to run a marathon, my injury helped guide my career at FDA and my work to strengthen FDA’s commitment to advancing women’s health research. And with the new Roadmap, we are well positioned to continue the progress that has been made in women’s health.

Pamela E. Scott, Ph.D., is Deputy Director and Director of Research and Development, FDA Office of Women’s Health.

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