A Quarter Century of Groundbreaking Science: The Forensic Chemistry Center

By: Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D.

This month marks the 25th anniversary of our Forensic Chemistry Center (FCC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. I recently joined former and current administrators and staff of this lab—one of FDA’s many incredible field laboratories—at an event celebrating this milestone.

Acting FDA Commissioner, Stephen Ostroff, M.D.One thing is clear: The last quarter-century has been a period of tremendous success at the FCC. FCC scientists use their scientific analysis and original research to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics and effects of adulterants on products regulated by the Agency, including chemical fingerprinting of poisons, glass, pharmaceuticals, food products and product packaging materials. By analyzing physical samples they can identify counterfeits, trace the origin of a pathogen or solve a crime.

In short, they are the CSI of FDA.

The commitment, expertise, and curiosity of FCC scientists have helped FDA overcome many scientific challenges, and made an extraordinary difference in the lives and safety of millions of Americans. Time and again the sophisticated analyses of puzzling substances by our scientists—often using innovative, esoteric methods, and groundbreaking research, along with the development of new processes and procedures—have made a critical difference in FDA’s ability to investigate and enforce–and protect the American public.

FCC Anniversary group photo

Former and current administrators and staff of the Forensic Chemistry Center (FCC) in Cincinnati, Ohio, at an event celebrating the 25th Anniversary. From left to right: Paul Norris, Director, Office of Regulatory Science; Steve Solomon, Deputy Associate Commissioner for Regulatory Affairs; Dr. Ostroff, Acting Commissioner of Food and Drugs; Phil Walsky, Deputy Director, Office of Criminal Investigations; Fred Fricke, former Director of FCC; and, Duane Satzger, Director of FCC.

FCC’s work has paved the way for passage of important laws, legal prosecutions, and consumer protection activities like recalls. And it has helped strengthen international relationships and advance international cooperation to ensure product quality and consumer safety.

Just a few highlights of FCC’s important efforts include:

  • In the 1990s, the lab supported some of FDA’s early work evaluating nicotine, which was recently cited in the proposed rule to deem additional tobacco products subject to the agency’s tobacco product authorities;
  • In 2001, after 22 people died in the Croatian Republic after receiving dialysis using certain devices, FCC’s analysis identified the presence of a toxic performance fluid in those devices that resulted in their recall by the manufacturers;
  • FCC investigated numerous illnesses and deaths of cats and dogs during 2007-8, which led to the determination that the pet food was adulterated with melamine and related compounds;
  • FCC’s investigation and analysis following the death of cattle in Washington State helped the FBI rule out the possibility that it was caused by terrorism;
  • Following the deaths of a number of infants in India who had been given the measles vaccine, FCC investigated the vaccine’s manufacturing process and discovered that the cause was not, as initially feared, a vaccine of poor quality. Instead the children had received pancuronium bromide, a muscle relaxant, which had been packaged in vials with similar size and shape to the vaccine, rather than the vaccine itself. This discovery was communicated to the Indian government, leading to a critical change in their immunization practices; and,
  • FCC developed a method for examining the sea animals impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which helped determine when the seafood would be safe to consume.

It is an extraordinary record. And it’s meant so much to FDA—and the nation—over the past 25 years. But the anniversary and success of this one lab also underscores the remarkable work done by all of FDA’s laboratories across the country. These labs and the districts in which they are located are the critical front line eyes and ears of FDA. And they are the springboard for excellent science.

Good science is fundamental to the mission of FDA. We need it to make good regulatory decisions. It’s what the public expects and deserves. By being able to handle and apply the science of today and anticipate the science of tomorrow we can be more flexible and adaptive, and support innovation.

Having seen the impressive and important work our labs are doing, I’m more committed than ever of the need to invest in better facilities and the best support. We must maintain state-of-the-art laboratories and research facilities, and attract, hire, and retain the best scientists to work in them. First-rate regulatory science requires first-rate scientists working in first-rate facilities.

It’s why I’ve made this a priority for FDA. And why we will put it high on our list of subjects for discussion with Congress as they shape future budgets for the Agency.

The scientists in FDA’s field laboratories are among the unsung heroes of FDA’s work to protect the public health. So let me congratulate and thank those at the FCC and across FDA on the milestone occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Forensic Chemistry Center.

Stephen M. Ostroff, M.D., is Acting Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Recent Related Posts