FDA Engages Internationally to Promote Access to Safe, Effective Animal Medicines

By: Bettye Walters, D.V.M.

Regulators around the world are reaching across national borders as they work together to ensure the safety of veterinary medical products.

Bettye WaltersI am a veterinarian on the International Programs Team at the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM). In this role, I attended the 4th Global Animal Health Conference in Tanzania on June 24 and 25 and participated in the global dialogue about the use and availability of high quality, safe and effective veterinary medical products in developing countries, especially in Africa. FDA embraces the One Health approach, which recognizes the connection between the health of people, animals and the environment.

I was accompanied by my colleague Steven Vaughn, D.V.M., who heads CVM’s Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation. Dr. Vaughn has years of experience exploring the most effective ways to regulate animal medications to ensure that they are high quality and safe.

The conference was attended by leading figures from the world’s governments, academia, industries, and international organizations and its focus was on the concept of “regulatory convergence,” a process that allows countries to bring their regulatory processes into closer alignment. We tackled important ideas related to promoting market control, including the surveillance of veterinary products on the market and improving access to effective animal drugs. We also discussed fostering systems for mutual recognition of regulatory oversight and standards, forming regional organizations, and implementing African regional harmonization initiatives to create a convergence of international guidelines.

If all countries can agree on the testing and safety of animal drugs, each country could have faster access to new medical products and be able to better leverage often-limited resources. While globalization provides many challenges, FDA believes it also offers opportunities for innovation if regulators, industry, and academia are working together for the benefit of all countries.

It’s a small world and solutions to public health problems, for both people and animals, are increasingly found on the world stage. FDA is committed to working with its global partners to promote cooperation in veterinary medicine.

Bettye Walters, D.V.M., is a veterinary medical officer on the International Programs Team at FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine.

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