FDA Teams With National Forum to Reduce Deaths from Heart Disease: Program is first of its kind

By: Heidi C. Marchand, Pharm.D.

In the U.S., only about 1 in every 4 prescriptions is taken as directed by a health care provider – a problem that costs our nation more than 125,000 lives a year. Millions of Americans with heart disease – the nation’s No. 1 killer – are especially vulnerable.

Heidi MarchandTo stem that tide, FDA has teamed with the nonprofit National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention to advance the cause of a heart-healthy and stroke-free society.

FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Forum to promote and increase the use of health knowledge, skills and practices by the public in their daily lives. The five-year agreement is a first-of-its-kind cooperative public education program to reduce the burdens of heart disease and stroke.

Heart disease, which kills 1 in 4 Americans, can be managed. To prevent heart attacks, transient ischemic attacks and other cardiac events, doctors prescribe medications and lifestyle therapies (e.g. heart-healthy diets). Because medication is not readily adhered to – and neither are lifestyle treatments – millions of people suffer from preventable cardiac episodes. As a nation, lack of medication adherence (which can be as simple as not getting a prescription filled or refilled) costs more than $100 billion annually in excess hospitalizations.

To confront this problem, FDA is taking the lead in support of Million Hearts®, a national initiative of the Department of Health and Human Services to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. A key partner in that mission is the National Forum, whose members include more than 80 U.S. and international organizations representing public, private, health care, advocacy, academic, policy and community sectors.

Together we will:

  • Explore, demonstrate and evaluate innovative health promotion concepts.
  • Exchange information on nutrition, heart disease, and ways to increase the number of patients who take their medication and/or therapy.
  • Identify and systematize best practices in behavior modification education.
  • Develop concepts for community-based interventions.

Our goals are clear: create recommendations to improve compliance with prescribed medical therapies and implement the recommendations to improve the lives of patients living with heart disease.

FDA’s Dr. Helene Clayton-Jeter and Dr. Fortunato “Fred” Senatore are leading a diverse team in identifying strategies to help patients take their medicines as directed and follow the advice of their doctors.

Concurrently, the National Forum will recruit a Therapy Adherence Steering Committee, made up of experts and stakeholders from physician and nursing groups, pharmacy (retail/system), behavioral health, consumer/patient groups and others invested in complying with medical therapy.

We’ll then jointly develop action plans for high-probability, high-yield strategies to promote heart health by helping ensure that patients take their medicines and adopt healthier lifestyles. Our plan is to complete all steps in the next several years.

We cannot fix this problem overnight. But by addressing it strategically, we can move forward and improve the odds of preventing and surviving heart disease and stroke among Americans.

Heidi Marchand, PharmD, is Assistant Commissioner in FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs

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