Regulatory Science Collaborations Support Emergency Preparedness

By: Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S.

Scientists love a challenge. And coordinating government agencies, healthcare providers, and numerous additional partners to protect public health in emergency situations is definitely a challenge.

Jean Hu-Primmer

Jean Hu-Primmer, Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

FDA’s Medical Countermeasures Initiative (MCMi) is working with federal agencies (through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise), product developers, healthcare professionals, and researchers, among other partners, to help translate cutting-edge science and technology into safe, effective medical countermeasures. Through these collaborations, MCMi supports research to help develop solutions to complex regulatory science challenges.

Data are critical to help FDA evaluate the safety and effectiveness of medical countermeasures—products that can save lives—during public health emergencies. But collecting data in the midst of an emergency is exceptionally challenging. Working with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), FDA is teaming with critical care physicians nationwide to help address these challenges.

Under a contract awarded last month, FDA and BARDA will work with the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group (USCIITG) to gather important information about medical countermeasures used during public health emergencies. Physicians will help address challenges with collecting and sharing data rapidly in emergencies, including streamlining electronic case reporting for clinical trials and rapidly disseminating key findings to FDA and other stakeholders to support clinical decision-making.

During this four-year project, USCIITG will also develop and pre-position a simple influenza treatment protocol in 10 hospitals throughout the U.S. during the 2015-2016 influenza season. The project will help doctors more easily use an investigational treatment protocol for patients with severe influenza, and test the data collection and reporting system during peak times. The goal is to help streamline the process during future influenza seasons and emergencies.

When it is not ethical or feasible to test the effectiveness of products in humans—such as countermeasures for potential bioterror agents—products may be approved under the Animal Rule. When products are approved under the Animal Rule, FDA requires additional studies, called phase 4 clinical trials, to confirm safety and effectiveness. In addition to the MCMi work, BARDA is funding USCIITG to investigate conducting phase 4 clinical studies during public health emergencies. USCIITG partners will train on these protocols, have them reviewed through their Institutional Review Boards (a requirement for all human studies), and create plans for enactment. USCIITG will then conduct an annual exercise to test these plans, a unique approach to broader science preparedness.

MCMi has also recently awarded regulatory science contracts to support other aspects of emergency preparedness, including two projects to investigate decontamination and reuse of respirators in public health emergencies (awarded to Battelle and Applied Research Associates, Inc.), and an award to support appropriate public use of medical countermeasures through effective emergency communication.

Our work involves big challenges. Through regulatory science, and through new and expanding collaborations, we continue to address these challenges to better prepare our nation to use medical countermeasures in emergencies.

Want to help? We’re currently accepting submissions for additional research to support medical countermeasure preparedness. If you have an idea for a new medical countermeasure regulatory science collaboration, we’d love to hear from you.

You can also visit BARDA’s MCM Procurements and Grants page for more information.

Jean Hu-Primmer, M.S., is Director of Regulatory Science Programs in FDA’s Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats.

Recent Related Posts