FDA’s New Roadmap for Progress: Strategic Priorities 2014-2018

By: Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates products that represent about 20 cents of every dollar American consumers spend on products. This includes the safety and effectiveness of drugs, medical devices, and vaccines, the safety of blood supply to food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that emit radiation, and more recently, tobacco. This fact can be easy to gloss over, but if one pauses for a moment to reflect on this fact, it is clear that the FDA’s regulatory role is large and truly meaningful to all of our everyday lives.

Margaret Hamburg, M.D.When the FDA was first established, our regulated industries were predominantly local, the volume of imported products was low, and even the movement of goods across country was minimal. But times have changed, and so have the strategies we employ to address those changes. Over the last five years alone, the FDA’s regulatory portfolio has increased to now include regulating tobacco products, developing a new global system for protecting food safety, and addressing challenges created by the global expansion of research, commerce and trade.

In fact, more often than not today, a drug or medical product that ends up on the shelves of an American drugstore or in our hospitals will come, at least in part, from some foreign source. Nearly 40 percent of finished medicines that Americans now take are made elsewhere, as are about 50 percent of all medical devices. Approximately 80 percent of the manufacturers of active pharmaceutical ingredients used in the United States are located outside our borders.

These and other new challenges and transformative developments in global science, technology and trade are rapidly altering the environment in which we work to fulfill our broad public health mission. In order to continue to carry out that mission, we need a set of clearly defined priorities and goals, as well as the strategies for reaching them. Therefore, I am pleased to announce the release of a revised set of FDA Strategic Priorities which will guide the agency in how we continue to promote and protect the health of the American public.

The new Strategic Priorities document sets the path for our Agency over the next four years. It establishes a framework for integrating our five strategic priorities – regulatory science, globalization, safety and quality, smart regulation, and stewardship.

Although each priority is significant in and of itself, the priorities are also interconnected and must not be addressed in isolation. In addition, this new roadmap sets forth FDA’s core mission goals and objectives, such as improving and safeguarding access to the products FDA regulates – and promoting better informed decisions about their use.

The Strategic Plan has been in development for more than a year and was created by a hard-working team of talented and knowledgeable FDA employees representing programs from across the agency. While this team drove the Plan’s creation, it is backed by the commitment of all of us at the FDA. My hope is that these priorities, which will be repeatedly cited in our speeches, policies and writings, will serve as our foundational guidepost, providing the strategic direction to help the agency continue to provide the level of service and protection the American people deserve.

Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

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