Opioid Auto-Injector Can Help Prevent Overdose Deaths

By: Dr. Douglas C. Throckmorton

The Food and Drug Administration has today made an important advance in helping to save lives when overdoses from drugs known as opioids occur: the approval of a drug that can actually reverse that overdose.

Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D.Opioids include legal prescription drugs, such as OxyContin (oxycodone) and Vicodin (hydrocodone with acetaminophen), used to treat pain, as well as illegal street drugs, such as heroin. In 2010, overdoses of prescription opioids were linked to 16,651 deaths and heroin was linked to 3,036 deaths in the United States.

Whether opioids are used by patients as prescribed by their health care professional or are misused or abused, these drugs have one important thing in common: They can all cause rapid and fatal overdose.

FDA, along with other organizations, has been working diligently on ways to address this major public health issue. That’s why FDA has approved a drug-device combination product that delivers the medication known as naloxone, which is the standard treatment for a drug overdose. This product is potentially easier to use than existing technology and thus could save lives.

Overcoming an Obstacle

Naloxone reverses the effects of opioids. Most significantly, it reverses the severely slowed breathing that can lead to death during an overdose. When naloxone works, the results can be dramatic: Comatose patients can wake up in minutes.

Over the years, emergency health care professionals and others with special training have saved thousands of lives by giving injections of naloxone to people suffering from opioid overdoses. Although effective, this requires expertise – to be able to draw the naloxone up from a vial and then inject it with a needle and syringe. In some cases, the injectable form is adapted so it can be administered through the nose, but there is currently no intranasal form of naloxone approved by FDA.

FDA has now approved  the first naloxone product that is given using an auto-injector, without having to use a separate needle and syringe.  Available via prescription, the product enables anyone – even the general public – to inject naloxone from a pre-filled, single-use device into a person who is overdosing. This is similar to devices used by laypeople to administer epinephrine in cases of severe allergy. In addition, the auto-injector gives recorded instructions to the user describing how to deliver the medication. The instructions also reinforce the need to seek emergency medical attention immediately because while naloxone works rapidly, it only temporarily reverses the effects of opioid overdose. The patient still needs immediate medical care.

The product’s brand name is Evzio, and information on its safe use is available by clicking this hyperlink.

This approval is the culmination of concerted efforts at FDA and throughout the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to spur research into alternative forms of naloxone and to expand its availability. On April 12, 2012, FDA co-sponsored a meeting that highlighted the impact of community-based naloxone distribution programs and explained to sponsors the path to FDA approval.

FDA Working on Other Fronts to Combat Opioid Misuse and Abuse

FDA has a responsibility to demand the best science and data to uphold its high standards to ensure a proper benefit/risk profile for drugs that treat pain. We also foster discussion and research that leads to a better understanding of pain and pain drugs. Because we are concerned about the public health issue, the agency has taken a number of actions to help reduce the devastating consequences of opioid misuse, abuse, and fatal overdoses. We are targeting key drivers of the problem with efforts that include:

  • Changing the labeling of certain opioids to help improve their safe use.
  • Requiring that manufacturers conduct studies of the safety of long-term use of certain prescription opioids.
  • Requiring that manufacturers  of certain opioids make training available to practitioners (physicians, dentists and others authorized to prescribe opioids) on responsible prescribing practices and assessing and addressing signs of abuse and/or dependence.
  • Strengthening our surveillance efforts to actively monitor the changing nature of prescription opioid abuse and identify emerging issues.
  • Working with the Drug Enforcement Administration on opioid controls.
  • Encouraging the development of new forms of opioids that are resistant to abuse.
  • Supporting the development of new pain treatments, especially non-addictive treatments.

While FDA plays an important role in mitigating the risks of addiction, abuse and misuse of prescription opioids, we cannot fix the problem alone. A comprehensive approach must be taken by federal and state governments, public health officials, opioid prescribers, addiction experts, researchers, industry, patient organizations, and others. That is why FDA is working closely with our HHS counterparts, including CDC, NIDA, SAMHSA, and throughout the US government.

There’s much work to be done, but today’s approval of the opioid auto-injector could save thousands of lives. FDA will continue to work to prevent the consequences of misuse and abuse of opioids, including preventing fatal overdoses.

Douglas C. Throckmorton, M.D., is Deputy Center Director for Regulatory Programs in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

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