Regulatory Science Supports FDA’s Regulatory Mission

By: Carolyn A. Wilson, Ph.D.

You might only think of FDA as a regulatory agency that oversees medical and food products. But FDA scientists, including those in the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), also perform research. In this first of two blog posts, I will describe how regulatory science, as it is called, helps to turn innovative medical research done at FDA and other places into life-saving or life-enhancing biological products.

Carolyn WilsonMost of the discoveries made at CBER support the development of new or improved vaccines, blood and blood products, and tissue, gene and cell therapies. This research also helps CBER make very informed decisions about new products and policies. That’s because many of the same CBER scientists whose research puts them at the cutting edge of science also review potential new products, inspect commercial facilities that make products, and help develop new policies and guidance documents for industry. In the past year, discoveries that CBER scientists have published in research journals have contributed significantly to public health by addressing issues that affect the safety and effectiveness of vaccines, gene therapy, and a treatment for a serious blood disorder.  

For example, scientists in the Office of Vaccines Research and Review (OVRR) took a big step in solving the mystery of why the rates of pertussis (whooping cough) in the United States have been increasing since the 1980s – despite widespread use of a pertussis vaccine. OVRR scientists showed in baboons that even though the vaccine can prevent symptoms of pertussis, animals receiving it still had the bacteria that cause the disease in their airways for up to six weeks.

These animals were then able to spread the bacteria to other animals. This suggests that while the vaccine protects children from getting pertussis symptoms, vaccinated children can still spread the bacteria through coughing to other children for several weeks – especially if those children aren’t vaccinated. This information is important because it can help scientists and public health officials design new vaccines and strategies to reduce the rate of pertussis in the US.

Statisticians and epidemiologists at CBER also make critical contributions to regulatory science. Serious adverse medical events sometimes occur in patients treated with licensed products (i.e., vaccines). When physicians or consumers report such events to the FDA, epidemiologists at the agency work to determine whether these events are actually caused by the licensed product or are just a coincidence. For example, epidemiologists and statisticians in the Office of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OBE) studied whether getting the vaccine for 2009 H1N1 influenza (the so-called “swine flu”) several years ago increased the risk of developing a nerve disease called Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS). GBS can sometimes occur after infections or vaccinations, causing weakness in the arms and legs and reducing reflexes. The concern about the 2009 vaccine was based on the occurrence of GBS over 30 years ago among some people who received the vaccine against a related strain of H1N1 virus in 1976. CBER’s epidemiologists asked whether the more recent vaccine used to protect against the 2009 H1N1 virus also increases this risk. To answer this question, OBE researchers reviewed the medical records of 23 million individuals who received the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine during the 2009-2010 influenza outbreak. Their statistical analysis showed that the risk of death or hospitalization from H1N1 infection was about 500 times greater than the risk of developing GBS from the vaccine. 

Studies like these are very important because they help FDA regulators and public health officials to determine whether potential adverse effects are actually linked to the use of a particular product. In this case, confirming the safety of the vaccine was an important public health measure because it reassured the public that this vaccine was safe to take. 

In my next blog post I’ll be discussing important contributions CBER scientists recently made to gene therapy and the treatment of a blood disease called hemophilia. 

Carolyn A. Wilson, Ph.D., is Associate Director for Research at FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

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