FDA Is Preparing Guidances that Will Help Food Companies Prevent Foodborne Illness

By: Susan Mayne, Ph.D., and Tracey Forfa, J.D.

En Español

When we were drafting and seeking public comment on the rules that will implement the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), we promised that we would do whatever we could to help the regulated industry understand and meet the new requirements.

Susan Mayne

Susan Mayne, Ph.D., is Director of FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

We meant what we said about “educating before and while we regulate,” since these new standards will ultimately transform the nation’s food safety system.

This month, we have taken important steps in fulfilling that promise with the release of three draft guidances that when finalized will help domestic and foreign food facilities meet the requirements of the preventive controls rules that became final in September 2015.

Those rules require hazard prevention practices in human and animal food processing, packing, and storage facilities. FSMA created the framework that holds manufacturers accountable for having a food safety plan, implementing it, verifying that it is working, and taking corrective action when it isn’t. Compliance dates are fast approaching for large food facilities. The human food facilities must meet preventive controls and Current Good Manufacturing Practice requirements (CGMPs) and the animal food facilities must meet CGMPs by September 19, 2016. (The preventive controls rules have staggered compliance dates; smaller facilities have a year or more additional time to comply.)

One of the draft guidance documents covers ways to comply with the preventive controls requirements of the human food rule. Given the scope of that rule, we are prepared to issue only five draft chapters now, covering specific sections of the rule, but we will ultimately issue 14 chapters in all.

Tracey Forfa

Tracey Forfa, J.D., is Acting Director of FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine

These initial chapters cover basic information about establishing preventive controls in a human food facility. The first chapter is about the food safety plan in which a human food facility outlines how it has identified and evaluated its food safety hazards and how it will control hazards requiring preventive controls. The subsequent chapters provide direction on conducting a hazard analysis; understanding the biological, chemical and physical hazards that are commonly of concern; identifying and implementing the preventive controls that will significantly minimize or prevent hazards; and managing the preventive controls through such actions as monitoring, corrective actions and verification activities.

The other two draft guidances when finalized will help domestic and foreign facilities comply with key requirements in the Preventive Controls for Animal Food rule, which covers all animal food, including animal feed and pet food. One of those documents provides direction on ways to comply with the rule’s CGMP requirements, which are baseline food safety and sanitation standards for animal food facilities. This draft guidance also provides information on provisions related to the CGMP requirements, such as qualifications and training of personnel.

While CGMPs have long existed for the production of human food, this is the first time that most animal food producers will be subject to CGMPs. Concerns about incidents of food contamination that were sickening and killing pets were among the driving forces behind the enactment of FSMA.

The third draft guidance when finalized will help domestic and foreign food facilities whose by-products of human food production are used as animal food. Such by-products include grain products and vegetable pulp. They also include foods like potato chips, baked goods and pasta that are safe to eat but considered the wrong size, shape, color or texture.

Food producers required to meet food safety requirements for human foods had been concerned that they would have to meet a whole new set of requirements for such by-products. The draft guidance makes clear that the by-product will only be subject to limited CGMPs to protect it from contamination during holding and distribution, if the human food facility is subject to and in compliance with FDA’s human food CGMPs and all applicable human food safety requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and implementing regulations and is not further processing the by-products for use as animal food.

If the human food facility is further processing the by-products, the facility has a choice of complying with the requirements of either the human or animal food rule, as long as the food safety plan addresses how the facility will prevent or significantly minimize the hazards for the animal food that require a preventive control.

These draft guidances, and the others that we’re working on for the FSMA rules, will be further refined based on input we receive from the public. The comments we received on the proposed FSMA rules were important in helping us shape the final rules so we look forward to working with stakeholders in the same way on these documents.

Meeting the FSMA mandate involves cooperation between the FDA and the food industry. From the smallest food operation to the largest company, we want to be sure that we’re all on the same page and these draft guidances will help get us there.

Susan Mayne, Ph.D., is Director of FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

Tracey Forfa, J.D., is Acting Director of FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine

Making Continuous Improvements in the Combination Products Program: The Pre-RFD Process

By: Thinh Nguyen and Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H.

One question that sponsors often ask FDA is whether their medical product will be regulated as a drug, a device, a biologic, or as a combination product, and in the case of the latter, which FDA component will regulate it.

Thinh Nguyen

Thinh Nguyen, FDA’s Director, Office of Combination Products

One way sponsors may determine how their product will be classified is to submit a Request for Designation (RFD) to the Office of Combination Products (OCP). This request requires FDA to provide a written determination of product classification and/or which agency component will regulate the product if it is a combination product. Sponsors have also been able to obtain less formal feedback regarding product classification through communications with OCP.

We are pleased to announce that the Agency is making some changes to our internal procedures for responding to communications from sponsors regarding preliminary product classification assessments from OCP. The Pre-Request for Designation (Pre-RFD) process is the result of cooperative efforts by OCP, the Office of Medical Products and Tobacco, and CDER Lean, including a formal internal evaluation that incorporates current state process mapping and identifies and integrates process improvements.

Rachel Sherman

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H., FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

The Pre-RFD process shares some similarities with the RFD process. In both cases, FDA’s assessment depends on sponsors providing a complete, clear, and detailed product description, which includes the product’s indication for use, its composition/ingredients, and an explanation of how it works. In most instances, both processes also require input from the product jurisdiction officers in the relevant Centers and, if necessary, legal perspectives from the Office of Chief Counsel.

Once OCP has received the necessary input, the Office makes its assessment of the classification and/or Center assignment for the product. OCP’s goal for Pre-RFDs is to respond to sponsors within 60 days following receipt of all information needed to initiate the review—the same timeline for responding to RFDs. During this review period the office will communicate with the sponsors as needed.

When may this Pre-RFD process be useful?

The Pre-RFD process can be used at any point during medical product development. It may be preferable to the more formal RFD process when a sponsor would like to engage FDA using a more interactive approach—a course that may be especially helpful when a medical product is at an early stage in its development, or when a sponsor is contemplating whether to develop a specific product, or what configuration of that product to pursue. In such cases, sponsors may find the Pre-RFD process beneficial for the following reasons:

(1) Sponsors are not required to provide a recommendation for classification and assignment of their product along with a corresponding rationale (e.g., bench studies; clinical studies) for that recommendation;

(2) Sponsors are not required to discuss the classification of currently marketed products that they believe to be similar to their product; and,

(3) Sponsors can receive preliminary feedback and information from the Agency that is derived from a structured and efficient process. The feedback will ultimately help lead to better decision-making and development of products for the sponsors.

Pre-RFD flow chart

FDA’s Pre-RFD Process Flow: To view, click on the image.

Because our feedback will be based on the information submitted, sponsors should bear in mind that the speed and quality of any review, whether Pre-RFD or formal RFD, is highly dependent on the quality of the submitted data.

The Agency is developing a draft guidance about the Pre-RFD process, which provides details about information sponsors should include in a Pre-RFD and describes the procedure for FDA’s review. In addition, the Agency plans to publish a list of product classifications for various types of products. We believe this list will offer additional transparency and clarity to sponsors that will ultimately foster innovation and promote better health for patients. We welcome your feedback regarding the Pre-RFD and RFD Programs, as well any other thoughts regarding the jurisdictional assessment of products.

A sponsor who wishes to submit a Pre-RFD or an RFD for a product can find detailed information at the OCP website or contact OCP at combination@fda.gov for further assistance.

Thinh Nguyen is FDA’s Director, Office of Combination Products

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H., is FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

FDA Supports Greater Access to Naloxone to Help Reduce Opioid Overdose Deaths

By: Karen Mahoney, M.D.

Overdose deaths involving prescription opioids such as oxycodone, hydrocodone and morphine and illicit opioids such as heroin and illegally produced fentanyl have more than tripled since 1999 – with about 28,000 people dying in 2014 alone.

Many of these tragedies could have been avoided if the people experiencing the overdose had immediately received the prescription drug naloxone, a life-saving medication that can stop or reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

Naloxone is still a prescription in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, though many have or are taking steps to make naloxone more accessible. Consistent with our opioid action plan announced earlier this year, the FDA is exploring options to make naloxone more available to treat opioid overdose. One option to do this is identifying ways to assist manufacturers in submitting an application to the FDA for an over-the-counter (OTC) version of a naloxone product.

That’s why the FDA is working on innovative ways to help facilitate the process of helping manufacturers pursue approval of an OTC naloxone product, including helping to develop the package label that would be required for such a product. This is an important step to help increase access to and the use of this life-saving drug.

Although the two currently available prescription naloxone products intended for use in the community — an auto-injector product for self-injection, and a nasal spray formulation – have instructions for use, they do not have the consumer-friendly Drug Facts Label (DFL), which is required for OTC drug products. Before submitting a new drug application or supplement for an OTC drug product, companies develop this DFL and conduct the required studies to show that consumers can follow the DFL to understand how to use the product without the help of a healthcare professional.

To help facilitate the development of OTC naloxone, the FDA has created a model DFL and an accompanying simple pictogram that could be placed next to the DFL to visually correspond to the label directions. This model DFL and pictogram are intended to provide consumers with the information they would need to understand how to safely use naloxone, including when it is appropriate to purchase naloxone and how to use it in an emergency opioid overdose situation. Since it is a model label, information that is highly specific to a particular product would not be included.

The FDA has also arranged for label comprehension testing of the model DFL. This testing is now being conducted and we expect that the results will yield important information about consumer understanding of the model naloxone DFL. Using this information, naloxone manufacturers may then be able to focus their final label comprehension testing on how well consumers understand product-specific information, such as instructions for the device that delivers naloxone that has not been already tested on the model DFL.

Creating a model DFL and arranging for label comprehension testing are among the ways that the FDA is working to fulfill our commitment to enhanced naloxone access, where possible, in our opioids action plan. We will continue to work with interested manufacturers and developers to further explore the best uses of naloxone for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdoses until emergency medical help arrives.

FDA’s opioid action plan is part of the comprehensive Opioid Initiative launched by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in March 2015. The Initiative focuses on high-impact strategies to 1) improve opioid prescribing, 2) expand access to medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorders, and 3) increase the use of naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses.

Karen Mahoney, M.D., is FDA’s Deputy Director, Division of Nonprescription Drug Products, at the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

Protecting the Public and Especially Kids from the Dangers of Tobacco Products, Including E-Cigarettes, Cigars and Hookah Tobacco

By: Mitch Zeller, J.D.

En Español

This month, for the first time, FDA will be able to help protect the public, and especially kids, from the dangers of all tobacco products.

For years, it has been illegal under federal law to sell cigarettes and smokeless tobacco to minors. Under a rule finalized in May, federal law now prohibits retailers from selling e-cigarettes, hookah tobacco or cigars to people under age 18.

Mitch Zeller, J.D., Director of FDA's Center for Tobacco ProductsBeginning today:

  • It will become illegal nationwide to sell cigars, hookah tobacco, and e-cigarettes to anyone under age 18 and retailers will need to check photo ID of anyone under age 27.
  • Retailers will not be allowed to give away free samples of newly deemed tobacco products.
  • Retailers will not be allowed to sell cigars, hookah tobacco, and e-cigarettes in a vending machine where anyone under age 18 has access at any time.

In 2009, the President signed the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act into law, giving FDA the authority to regulate cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, and smokeless tobacco. But cigar, hookah tobacco and e-cigarette markets remained unregulated, creating a market environment I have equated in the past to the Wild, Wild West.

While there has been a significant decline in the use of traditional cigarettes among youth over the past decade, their use of other tobacco products continues to climb – putting a new generation of kids at risk of addiction. E-cigarette use, for example, skyrocketed from 1.5 percent in 2011 to 16 percent in 2015 (an over 900 percent increase) among high school students; and hookah use also increased significantly. And every day, more teenage boys try a cigar than try a cigarette.

That’s why this historic rule is so important. It enables FDA to regulate all tobacco products except accessories – improving public health and protecting future generations from the dangers of tobacco.

In addition to restricting youth access to tobacco products, FDA will now be able to review new tobacco products not yet on the market, prevent misleading claims and help better provide consumers with information to make informed decisions about their tobacco use. This means tobacco product manufacturers will be required to register and list their products with FDA.  And all newly regulated products will need to get a marketing order from FDA, unless they are grandfathered (were sold in the U.S. as of February 15, 2007.) Manufacturers will also be required to report ingredients and harmful and potentially harmful constituents in their products.

Protect_Future_050316_twitter

 

Under these public-health based regulations, tobacco product manufacturers seeking a marketing order from FDA must now demonstrate what is actually in these products, and how these products impact the health of those who use them – important rules to be expected for products that expose consumers to known or potential health risks.

To assist companies in making the transition to an FDA-regulated marketplace, we have published several guidance documents to help businesses, big and small, meet these new requirements. We also continue to offer webinars for retailers and manufacturers and support from our Office of Small Business Assistance.

This historic final deeming rule is a major public health step forward. We believe by restricting youth access to additional tobacco products such as cigars, hookah, and e-cigarettes and by scientifically reviewing these products, we will reduce the public health toll of tobacco use, which remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the country and the world – and keep our kids tobacco-free.

Mitch Zeller, J.D., is the Director of FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products

FDA Working to Keep the U.S. Blood Supply Safe from Zika and other Emerging Threats

By: Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., and Luciana Borio, M.D.

En Español

Each day in the United States, thousands of people receive transfusions of blood or blood products as part of their medical treatment. Although such transfusions can save lives, like most medical treatments they may also carry some risks. Among the most concerning risks is the chance that a patient might get an infection from a transfusion. Some of these risks, like hepatitis and HIV, have been known for some time. Others, like the Zika virus, have emerged more recently.

One of FDA’s top priorities is to help assure that the blood supply is safe for all those who need these potentially life-saving products. This mission is accomplished through close collaboration with other government agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and non-governmental partners, such as blood collection establishments and screening test developers.

These coordinated efforts are crucial because blood safety relies on a combination of factors, including understanding the epidemiology of infectious disease transmission and the testing that can be done to detect it.

Our experience with other infectious agents has positioned us well to address Zika virus. We have worked closely with the CDC since the outbreak began to emerge. We have also been in continual contact with blood collection establishments, screening test manufacturers, and local health authorities.

When it became apparent early in 2016 that Zika virus could pose a risk to the blood supply in the United States, FDA issued recommendations to reduce the risk of its transmission through blood transfusions by deferring those donors at risk of being infected with Zika virus as well as by screening donated blood in certain areas. Given the large amount of scientific data that is emerging and the rapid spread of the outbreak in the Western hemisphere, FDA understands that it may need to revisit and update this guidance soon to maintain the safety of the blood supply.

As part of the overall response, FDA also collaborated with the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health to ensure that safe blood was available to those needing a transfusion in Puerto Rico and other areas at risk before a blood screening test for Zika virus became available. The Agency also worked with manufacturers to help speed the development of screening tests to detect Zika virus at the earliest point in time after infection. We also worked with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency to help facilitate the evaluation of these tests and other measures.

Helped by these and other ongoing collaborations with federal and non-federal partners, FDA is able to pursue its mission of protecting and promoting your health.

Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., is Director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research
Luciana Borio, M.D., is FDA’s Acting Chief Scientist

Piloting an Improved Intercenter Consult Process

By: Michael Rappel, Ph.D., and Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H.

Over the last few months, we’ve shared what FDA is doing to improve the review of combination products, including establishing the Combination Product Council and identifying necessary process improvements through lean mapping of the combination product review process. We are pleased to update you on the proposed intercenter consult request (ICCR) process that will be piloted across the Agency today.

Michael Rappel

Michael Rappel, Ph.D., Senior Science Advisor in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and member of the Lean Management Team.

Combination products—those that combine drugs, devices, and/or biological products—present both policy and review challenges in large part because they include constituent parts that fall into more than one regulatory category (e.g., drug and device; drug and biologic) covered by more than one FDA product center. As such, close intercenter collaboration and communication are important to facilitate timely, appropriately-tailored and well-informed submission review. A combination product will generally have a lead center which may seek consults from the other centers that oversee one of the product’s constituent parts. Timely and consistent consults are critical, yet achieving this has been challenging due to different policies, practices, and timelines for consults across centers and insufficient communications between centers and sponsors.

Our new process addresses these issues with four important improvements:

  • Establishing timelines, specific to center and submission type, for identifying products as combination products and issuing and completing consults needed to support the review;
  • Developing  a tiered consult approach that streamlines interactions across centers and identifies a clear process for identifying the right experts for a consult;
  • Defining clear roles and responsibilities for the Lead Center, the Consulted Center(s), the Office of Combination Products (OCP), and the Combination Product Council for review of a combination product submission; and,
  • Creating a standard, semi-automated, user-friendly ICCR form that is managed electronically to ensure 1) users always have the most updated version and 2) all forms, and thus all intercenter combination product consults, are tracked through a single system.
Rachel Sherman

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., MPH, FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

FDA will begin piloting this new ICCR process today in select offices within our three medical product centers, focusing on those offices or divisions that routinely receive combination product submissions that require cross center consults. The pilot will be comprised of three phases, with phase 1 planned to last for two months. Additional offices in each center will be rolled into the pilot in subsequent phases with the goal of achieving implementation across all Offices by the end of 2Q 2017 (targeted).

During each phase of implementation, we will collect quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate success. What we learn at each stage will allow us to refine processes, procedures, and training for subsequent phases. In particular, data from phases 1 and 2 will be used largely to refine the initial steps of the ICCR process (e.g., consult request, ICCR form, reviewer assignment) though some limited consult completion data (e.g., consult quality and timeliness) available for Investigational Device Exemptions/Investigational New Drugs may provide initial insights on consult closeout. Consult completion data for other submission types will also be collected but may not be available for several months due to the longer submission review timelines.

This iterative approach will ensure implementation of a robust ICCR process that enables efficient, effective collaboration on the review of combination products. Further, auditing regarding combination product designation and consult tier assignment completed by each center will verify effective knowledge transfer or highlight gaps to focus on in subsequent improvement efforts.

This current effort has been driven by a cross-Agency ICCR working group and builds on the important work of many others across the Agency.

We hope this overarching approach to cross-center activity will, if successful, serve as a flagship model for other cross-Agency initiatives requiring close collaboration. We believe that this kind of nimble, adaptive cooperation reflects the future of medical product development and review in an increasingly complex and nuanced arena. Stay tuned—we plan to keep you updated on our progress along the way. Meanwhile, if you have any feedback or input, please feel free to contact us at: combinationproductICCRpilot@fda.hhs.gov.

Michael Rappel, Ph.D., is Senior Science Advisor in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and is a member of the Lean Management Team

Rachel E. Sherman, M.D., M.P.H., is FDA’s Associate Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco

The Unique Voices of Our Patient Representatives

By: Robert M. Califf, M.D., and Heidi C. Marchand, Pharm.D.

We recently met with 21 inspirational patients and patient caregivers who have made the extraordinary commitment to become FDA patient representatives. These volunteers were in Washington to participate in our two-day Patient Representative Workshop so they can receive training that will allow them to help FDA meet its critical responsibility of guiding the development and evaluation of safe and effective medical products.

Robert Califf

Robert Califf, M.D., Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The patient representative program has existed since 1999 and is integral to fulfilling FDA’s strong commitment to ensure that the needs and choices of patients – as well as their families, caregivers, and advocates – are incorporated in ever greater ways in the work we do.

Patients add context and content to the cutting-edge science and other empirical evidence that is so important in our regulatory decision-making.  Including their perspectives and voices in our work along the entire medical product continuum, from development to review and evaluation to post-market surveillance, offers opportunities to enhance our knowledge of the benefits and risks of medical products. It’s not only smart science; it just makes good sense. We know, for instance, that patients who live with a chronic disease are experts in the tangible effects of that disease and its treatments.

The training that patient representatives receive helps prepare them to serve on FDA advisory committees, meetings and workshops, where they are knowledgeable about what it is like to cope with their disease – including such topics as side effects from treatments and important lifestyle issues. They also provide valuable contributions as consultants to our review staff.

Heidi Marchand

Heidi C. Marchand, Pharm.D., Assistant Commissioner in FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs

To give you an idea of the unique set of skills and experiences patient representatives bring to their work, consider the stories and experiences we heard at the workshop.

One was an elite world class athlete, who initially thought her pain was muscular in nature before it was diagnosed as a serious blood clot. She has been on a series of different products since then and is now intimately familiar with what it is like to be on anticoagulants – reflecting on both the benefits and risks of taking these medications.

Two of our patient representatives are caregivers who have a personal experience with a rare disease, Batten’s Disease, a fatal, inherited disorder of the nervous system. Sadly, each lost a young son to the disease. But in the face of this tragedy, these two mothers have advocated tirelessly to find a cure for this disease and worked to educate other parents.

Another mother related the story of her daughter who, at age 16, survived two craniotomies to remove a lemon-sized brain tumor. The daughter went on to receive of 48 weeks of chemotherapy and 8 weeks of brain and spine radiation. The daughter is now 33 years old and doing well. And the mother told us how critical it was for her daughter to take an opioid to relieve her pain. This kind of input, from those who have experienced it first hand, is critical to our future decisions.

2016 FDA Patient Representative Group photo

FDA Patient Representatives at the 12th Annual FDA Patient Representative Workshop, hosted by FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs

The stories that these patient representatives tell are moving. But even more moving – and indeed inspirational – is their commitment to the future. That’s why they were selected – because of their individual involvement with their respective patient communities, their analytical skills, and their ability to maintain an open mind and consider options.

While we will help train them about the nuts and bolts of FDA – such as the various pathways that products take to get to market – it is their personal experience and their ability to understand and to articulate the perspectives, concerns, and experiences of patients – that makes them truly special.

As we continue to evaluate potential treatments and cures for different diseases, we must make sure that patients are more than simply statistics in this equation. They are real people, with names, faces, and, thanks to these patient representatives, important voices who represent an essential piece of the puzzle to be solved.

FDA is committed to looking for new and better ways to integrate the patient voice. Our patient representatives are an important piece of this commitment. They have an extraordinary impact. We thank them for their service and commitment, and look forward to working with them.

Robert M. Califf, M.D., is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Heidi C. Marchand, Pharm.D., is Assistant Commissioner in FDA’s Office of Health and Constituent Affairs

Practical Applications of FDA Regulations for the Indian Food Industry

By: Dean Rugnetta

Dean RugnettaGlobalization of the food supply chain and advances in food processing technologies have led American consumers to develop a taste for a variety of foods and cuisines from different countries. Increasingly, U.S. grocery stores sell foods from Asia, Latin America, and many other parts of the world. Indian exporters have recognized this marketing opportunity, and FDA information shows an increase in U.S. imports from India over the past 10 years. A wealth of ready-to-eat Indian specialties can be found in cans and bottles on U.S. store shelves including Indian curries (a.k.a. gravies), canned sweets, pickled cucumbers, and Indian pickles (chopped fruits and vegetables marinated in brine).

A serious potential health risk in canned and bottled foods

FDA’s regulations for processing shelf-stable or commercially sterile food — such as certain canned and bottled foods — were promulgated in the 1970’s in response to deaths related to botulism poisoning. Botulism is a muscle-paralyzing disease caused by a toxin made by the bacterium called Clostridium botulinum.  FDA’s regulations require that processors heat and/or formulate low acid canned foods and acidified foods in a manner that eliminates favorable growth conditions for such toxins.

The regulations also require that supervisors in plants that manufacture such products be trained in appropriate processing methods. In the United States, FDA collaborates with industry groups, academia and other stakeholders to offer “Better Process Control Schools,” which typically provide two to five days of training.

Better Process Control School in India

Better Process Control School Class Group Photo

Students attending Better Process Control School in India

India now has a Better Process Control School where supervisors at any of the 300 FDA-registered facilities can attend training on how to safely process low acid canned foods and acidified foods. The school was established in 2010 when FDA’s India Office partnered with FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN), and a local university in New Delhi, India. The school has convened three separate times since then, most recently this spring. The training helps local processors learn FDA’s regulatory requirements and fulfill a regulatory mandate. Processors that successfully complete the course receive a certificate.

The long-term goal of the training partnership in India is to establish a locally sponsored, self-sustaining class and demonstrates how FDA’s international outreach efforts are improving the safety of imported food products.

Dean Rugnetta is the Deputy Director of FDA’s India Office in New Delhi, India 

Links to other FDA Voice Blogs:

Addressing Global Challenges through Transatlantic Cooperation

By: Howard Sklamberg, J.D., Lou Valdez, and Donald Prater

Howard Sklamberg

Howard Sklamberg, J.D., FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

On a recent trip to Brussels, our FDA delegation met with many of our European Union (EU) regulatory counterparts and stakeholders to discuss ways to strengthen our shared commitment to product safety and public health.  

Reflecting the broad scope of our transatlantic dialogue, we engaged on an array of issues, including supply chain safety, quality metrics, risk-based surveillance, data integrity, mutual reliance, and food safety systems.

Building on previous exchanges between FDA and the European Parliament (EP), we first met with Members of the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee, known as ENVI.  ENVI Committee members visited FDA in 2013 and 2015 to share their perspective on how certain health-related topics are being addressed in the European Union. In addition, our FDA delegation exchanged views on recent trilateral cooperation with India and China on Good Clinical Practices and food safety and other approaches to cooperation on the international stage.

Lou Valdez

Mary Lou Valdez, FDA’s Associate Commissioner for International Programs

We then met with the head of the European Commission’s Directorate General for Health and Food Safety (DG SANTE), Director General Xavier Prats-Monné, and his colleagues.

We shared our observations on several topics, including:

  • How drug development has changed, including globalization of suppliers and distributors;
  • The challenges among regulatory bodies in keeping pace with risk-based allocation of inspection resources;
  • The complexity of the global supply chain and the need to collaborate on enforcement;
  • The significant progress being made on the Mutual Reliance Initiative (MRI);
  • Pharmaceutical GMP inspections; and
  • The interaction among FDA’s Europe, China, and India offices and regulatory counterparts in the EU and Governments of China and India.
Donald Prater

Donald Prater, D.V.M., Director of the Europe Office in FDA’s Office of International Programs.

We then turned to food safety. Currently, the U.S. and the European Commission are working on a Food Safety Systems Recognition arrangement, a program that FDA has developed to increase regulatory cooperation and build toward reliance on the work of regulatory counterparts.

Such cooperation is facilitated through the reciprocal assessment of one another’s food safety systems to ensure the safety of foods produced under one another’s oversight. The United States already has an arrangement in place with New Zealand and recently signed one with Canada.

We also reviewed the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) and discussed ways FDA and the European Commission can assist suppliers in the EU to better understand the FSMA requirements. Acknowledging that food safety standards are quite high in the United States and the EU, we discussed ways we can leverage the systems on both sides of the Atlantic to further protect consumers and more efficiently use our oversight resources globally.

FDA and EU Delegations in Brussels

A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) delegation met with many of their European Union (EU) regulatory counterparts in Brussels to discuss ways to strengthen the shared commitment to product safety and public health. Pictured from left to right are: Karin Kadenbach, Member European Parliament (MEP); Sandy Kweder, Deputy Director, FDA’s European Office; Lou Valdez, FDA’s Associate Commissioner for International Programs; Matthias Groote, MEP; Howard Sklamberg, FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy; and, Susanne Melior, MEP.

Next up were meetings on medical devices and cosmetics with the Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship, and SMEs, also known as DG GROWTH.

We were welcomed by Carlo Pettinelli, Head of the Directorate for Consumer, Environmental and Health Technologies, and we discussed the key objectives of the Medical Device Single Audit Program (MDSAP) of the International Medical Device Regulators Forum (IMDRF). Mr. Pettinelli acknowledged the importance of MDSAP, and indicated that the European Commission would continue to provide coordination and communication to support the engagement of EU Member States in the program.

We also set aside time for discussion with key industry stakeholders representing medical products – primarily drugs and devices, including, the American Chamber of Commerce Healthcare Committee to the EU and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Association (EFPIA). There we reviewed FDA’s Pharmaceutical Quality and MRI initiatives.

Our trip concluded with a media roundtable and a briefing to the Deputy Chief of Mission and staff at the U.S. Mission to the European Union. Our FDA Europe Office is based at the USEU and provides critical support to U.S. Ambassador Anthony Gardner.

Throughout all our meetings, one theme was crystal clear: Transatlantic cooperation is vitally important to address the challenges and opportunities of a globalized marketplace.  By carefully evaluating and understanding each other’s regulatory systems, there is tremendous potential to better allocate our resources based on risk, and improve the safety of food, medical products, cosmetics, and other products around the world.

Howard Sklamberg, J.D., is the Deputy Commissioner for Global Regulatory Operations and Policy

Mary Lou Valdez is the Associate Commissioner for International Programs

Donald Prater is Director of FDA’s Europe Office

The Rise in Orphan Drug Designations: Meeting the Growing Demand

By: Gayatri Rao, M.D., J.D.

Developing drugs for rare diseases, once considered a rare phenomenon itself, has fast become a mainstay for many companies’ drug development pipelines. This is exciting news for the 30 million Americans with rare diseases and their families.

Dr. Gayatri RaoCongress played no small role in making this a reality when it passed the Orphan Drug Act in 1983.  One of the key features of this Act was the creation of the Orphan Drug Designation Program, which provides important financial incentives to encourage companies to develop drugs and biologics for rare diseases. This legislation includes major tax credits to defray the cost of conducting clinical trials, as well as eligibility for seven years of market exclusivity. As a result of later amendments to the Act, no user fee is required for orphan drug product submissions, except when an application includes an indication for a non-rare disease or condition.

The number of requests for orphan drug designation received by FDA’s Office of Orphan Products Development (OOPD) has grown dramatically in recent years and is prompting FDA to adjust its timeframes for reviewing orphan drug designations in order to meet the demand. In 2014, we saw a 30% increase over the prior year’s record number. Yet, that record was broken the very next year when we received close to 470 requests. And the pace does not seem to be slowing. In fact, comparing the number of new requests received so far in 2016 with the corresponding date in 2015, there appears to be yet another 30% increase.

We strive to review these requests in an efficient and timely manner because we understand how critical designation can be for companies to move forward with their drug development plans. At the same time, we endeavor to safeguard the intent of the Orphan Drug Act by conducting a thorough review to ensure that the drugs we designate fully satisfy the criteria for designation and the financial incentives associated with designation.

While there is no statutory or regulatory review deadline, it has been our internal goal to review 75% of designation requests within 90 days of receipt. By streamlining our programs, modifying work priorities, and restructuring workloads, we have generally been able to meet or exceed that internal goal. However, the sustained increase in designation requests over the last three years, coupled with the increasing number of incentive programs and competing workload priorities, have forced us to reconsider our internal review target. Reviewing these applications in an efficient and timely manner continues to be a top priority, but to ensure we continue to conduct these reviews with the appropriate level of care and consideration, our current goal is to review on average 75% of designation requests within 120 days of receipt.

We will continue to evaluate workload in relation to resources, and may need to further adjust review timelines in the future.

Companies can play a critical role in ensuring that the new review timeframe does not translate into a delay in obtaining orphan drug designation by doing their part to reduce the number of review cycles needed (i.e., when OOPD needs additional information from the sponsor prior to determining the outcome of an orphan drug designation request).

On average, a request for designation today goes through two such review cycles. Sponsors can shorten this process by ensuring that designation requests are complete and fully address all requirements. We recommend sponsors review the information at www.fda.gov/orphan for helpful hints and FAQs when developing their requests.

The rise in the number of requests for orphan drug designation holds promise for the future of rare disease drug development. We remain committed to the timely and effective administration of the Orphan Drug Designation Program with the shared hope of bringing safe and effective products quickly to the patients who need them most.

Gayatri Rao, M.D., J.D., is FDA’s Director for The Office of Orphan Products Development